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What do I need for sharpening my woodturning tools? What I got from my class last week was that the Wolverine system with some other jig (didn't catch the name) was the way to go with a low speed 8" bench grinder. Anyone have thoughts on this? What about grits for the wheels?

Thanks, folks.
 

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I use a Wolverine Jig and the Vari-Grind attachment. That's the other jig you were talking about. Slow speed grinder is best and I use 120 grit wheels. The other thing that really helps make a great edge is grinding wheel balancers. It's unbelieveable the difference in the grind with a balanced wheel...You can see all this stuff at www.oneway.on.ca
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I use a Wolverine Jig and the Vari-Grind attachment. That's the other jig you were talking about. Slow speed grinder is best and I use 120 grit wheels. The other thing that really helps make a great edge is grinding wheel balancers. It's unbelieveable the difference in the grind with a balanced wheel...You can see all this stuff at www.oneway.on.ca
What RPM is considered slow?

Thanks for the link!!!
 

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I see Delta has a new variable speed 8" grinder. I'm sure others have one too....If I was to get a new one I would opt for variable speed. The grinder I have runs 1800 rpm and I have found that a bit fast....1250 would be perfect and even slower for some stuff. That's where variable would be nice....;) ;) ;)
 

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Burlkraft

Oneway says the recommended speed for a grinder used to sharpen tools is 3400 rpm's. Everyone else says slower speeds to prevent overheating oxidation. Oneway says anything under 3400rpm's the surface speed isn't fast enough. My grinder has two speeds1734/3400 rpm's per minute and believe me there is a big difference. I make some turning tools and there is a noticeable difference in speeds when grinding a tool. Mitch:thumbsup:
 

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My Grandfather, who did a lot of turning, had a grinder from Brookstone, I believe, and it was a true wet wheel....maybe 200 rpm? and the stone, maybe 200 grit?, turned immersed in water. It would put a fine edge on a chisel or his turning tools, and never a burn. At such a slow speed, balance would not be a problem either.

Alas, all of his tools and equipment was sold at his estate sale, in 1985....I could not be forced to do woodworking then....what I missed!
 

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Oneway says the recommended speed for a grinder used to sharpen tools is 3400 rpm's.
Hey Mitch,

I tried OneWay's recomendation on speed and I finally realized that OneWay does sell tools....;) ;) ;)

The only thing grinding at that speed does as far as I can see is make bowl gouges short in a short amount of time...:shifty: :shifty: :shifty:
 

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Burlkraft

I agree with you that it makes tools short up to a point. Get your tool sharpened correctly once and continue sharpening like that and then grinding at 3400 rpm's takes off no more metal than any other speed but the difference in how sharp the tool is will change your mind on what speed to use. Try sharpening a tool where you need to take a little metal off at a slower speed, then use 3400 and see the difference.

You can bet Oneway makes turning tools, good ones . Did you ever try using their little Termite? It is an excellent performing tool. Leaves the surface ready to finish. Terrific on hollowing end grain. I like sharpening tools, any tools as much as I like turning wood. Mitch
 

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Burlkraft

I agree with you that it makes tools short up to a point. Get your tool sharpened correctly once and continue sharpening like that and then grinding at 3400 rpm's takes off no more metal than any other speed but the difference in how sharp the tool is will change your mind on what speed to use. Try sharpening a tool where you need to take a little metal off at a slower speed, then use 3400 and see the difference.

You can bet Oneway makes turning tools, good ones . Did you ever try using their little Termite? It is an excellent performing tool. Leaves the surface ready to finish. Terrific on hollowing end grain. I like sharpening tools, any tools as much as I like turning wood. Mitch
 

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Mitch,

The problem I have found with high speed grinding is the amount of heat that is applied to the tool. HHS tools scorch pretty quick and loose their temper, which leads to sharpening more often. I use a deep fluted gouge with a revised Irish grind. I have made the cutting edge of the right side of the gouge about 2" long. This is a pretty long edge, which means a long grind surface, which means a lot of heat at a higher speed. I use a blue 220 grit stone and I have about a dozen gouges ready at all times so I really do not use them until they are dull. That way my grinds are just touch up grinds and not a total regrinding every time.

I love my Termite Tool...There's nothing that works better for hollowing end grain.....:yes: :yes:
 

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Burlkraft

I understand what you mean when you say gouges burn at high speeds but with practice and a lighter touch you can almost eliminate that problem. Something I don't quite understand is when you say you have several deep fluted gouges and keep them sharp all the time. (so far I understand),but when you say,you don't use them till they are dull, therefore you just need to touch up. could you explain the last statement? I use the same gouge and also had the Irish grind for a while but found out I didn't use that long a grind. I used this grind when sharpening with the Tormek system. Now I use Wolverine vari grind jig just as you do. I just had a thought,seems you use Oneway tools and stones so if your having trouble overheating the edge on the long grind surface ask them about their little trick of turning the long grind into 3 touch grinds instead of one. Eliminates the burn and the tool is just as sharp.In other words, just touch the back of the long grind then the center and then the front of the grind. I do this and after touching 3 times I grind the whole thing over so lightly it never burns. The trick is to get used to doing it so lightly you can do it in one pass. Mitch
 

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I guess what I was trying to say is that I don't use the gouge until it's dull. You know how you can tell right at the time the edge starts going away by the texture of the cut?? Then you use it till it starts spitting dust instead of curls..???..I usually stop when I notice a change in the cut and then use the next gouge. Depending on what I'm turning I can change gouges every 1/2 hour or every couple of minutes. When I'm done or when I run out of gouges I'll touch them all up. I've gotten pretty good at a single pass touch up. On duller tools I'll do a 3 grind on it.
I'm sure that sharpening is all in what you are used to. I guess all that matters is a sharp tool....Don't matter how you get it there....;) ;)
 
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