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I just attempted to sharpen my skew for the first time.
When I got it, the cutting edge was slightly convex; to help prevent a catch as I understand it. I got a sharp edge, but now it's flat, maybe even a tinch concave. Where am I going wrong.

PS, I'm using the Oneway grinding jig with the skew attachment. I even dressed the stone to ensure it was flat.

As I write this, I'm wondering how it could ever be possible pto get a convex edge using a stone with a flat face, so any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Have a look at this video from Brendan Stemp (Aussie)
IMHO This is the best I have seen for explaining the uses of Skews.
PS..There is now Part 2 available.

Since watching Eli Avisera (Israel) I now sharpen my skews with a convex shape & find it far easier to use.


HTH
Col
 

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I am probably a little set in my ways. I have seen videos of Eli and Jimmy Clewes using a convex skew but it looks hard to sharpen to me (not too hard to form). The videos I have seen the convex is formed free hand on the grinder. By sharpening I am referring to honing and stropping for a razor edge on the skew. It seems it would not take much excess roll to dull rather than sharpen but then I don’t claim their level.

I do see where a convex may help in maintain bevel support.

I did try the curved (radius) blade but I suppose my eye was trained to following a straight line rather than a curve. I ground everything back straight. I tend to roll beads from the heel of the blade.

So my skews are like my bench tools. Like bench tools, they never go back to the grinder. A quick 4-5 strokes on a stone and they are ready. The key is to hone often. The only time to go back to the grinder would be to add depth to the concave so you are only honing the cutting edge and the heel rather than the entire bevel.
Jmho, Mike

I noticed in the video Brendan uses a straight grind also. Don’t know if it is convex, flat, or concave.
 

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There isn't any real difference in whether the shape of the skew will prevent a catch. I have used many different skews. If your on the bevel it will cut. If you come off the bevel it will get a catch. It's that simple. Shape doesn't seem to affect it. Only practice does. When I hear someone say this skew doesn't catch as bad as that skew it's because they practiced with the first skew.
Go to www.youtube.com and type in John60Lucas skew and look at my various skew videos. I do have one on sharpening, and the others are on skew variations and skew practice.
 

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As I understand it, with a curved edge on a skew , it must be one curve and one curve only . The outer points of that curve are the outer points of the tool .
Any return curve will turn that skew into more of a round nose scraper , and havoc may ensure.

my two bobs worth :icon_smile:
 

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Nope, it doesn't matter the shape of the curve. It's all in how you use the skew and even how you use that particular part of the skew. Alan Lacers skew has a sort of straight area that moves into a curve. The straight area works great for paring cuts that are similar to using a parting tool. The curved section is better for planing cuts.
I played with them all over the last 2 or 3 years trying to learn more.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFlZyGKYro4
 
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