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Discussion Starter #1
Hey..

I just picked up a BEAUTIFUL Log which will be a Didgeridoo in the future.. I am amazed by the shape of this piece of Chinese Elm..

Today i peeled it and started to shape it.. and i figured it gets a little sweaty if there arent the right tools to work with..

I was wondering what would you suggest me to invest in that would help me shape this log in a short time and with little effort?!

Right now i am equipped with a big Japanese Flushcut Saw and a Spokeshave . It will take forever if i go on like this and also I found that the Spokeshave isnt effective in hard curves like those..


Are there any (power)Tools that come into your mind?

Thanks for your help :yes:
 

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The one that comes to mind is a 5" grinder with an 80 grit pad on it. I bought my DeWalt just for that and "man it's like a shaping machine on steroids". Always do this work outside and wear a mask because it will remove material fast. After the 80 grit you can go to a lighter grit for final sanding and shaping. Works "GREAT".
Donny
 

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If you want to go the hand tool way tart with a side hatchet. This is a hatchet that is ground on one side only so you can cut almost flush with where you want to be. For rough cutting you can just use a regular hatchet.
then switch to a Draw knife. The draw knife will remove wood way faster than a spokeshave.
Because you are cutting through a lot of knots and pith areas this will be a very slow way to go.
I have more tools than that and would start with a chainsaw, very carefully removing waste. Then I'd switch to an angle grinder with either one of the burr type wheels or 24 grit sandpaper. That will get you down to final shape really fast. Then you could just keep changing grits until you have it finely shaped and sanded to the degree you want.
 

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If you go the power tool route, please be safe.

There was a very bad incident within the last couple of weeks where a woodturner nearly lost his life to an angle grinder that he was holding in one hand, the workpiece in his other hand. He survived -- but with 100+ stitches to the cuts around his neck and head.

Both hands on the angle grinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thank you all for the replies!

I probably want to use power tools for this one as i think the costs are equal or even less .. a good hatchet or draw knife with an decent blade will be pricy ..

The angle grinder looks scary to me ... Still i am going to get one and just use a other disc to begin with..

@ Don - Thanks - Could you be more specific in what dewalt tool you have + Discs please?!

@Manuke - LOL ... There is only one certain species of termites that will do a great job in hollowing the log, tho they are pretty slow workers only fund in the Australian forest..

Modern western Didgeridoo Crafters use the "sandwich" technique instead of the termites - with a bandsaw the log will be split lenghtwise.... then hollowed out .. The lancelot tool became very popular in the last year for the hollowing out process..

check out modern didgeridoo crafter
http://hallowedsounds.com/index.html
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Oh.. another thing that i forgot to mention.. The log is fresh.

The reason i shape this piece in a wet condition is just so that it will dry much faster when its not 7 inch in diameter..

I will then give it an anchorseal coating to create a fake bark.

Can i use an angle grinder on wet wood??

thanks,
ceder
 

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@Manuke - LOL ... There is only one certain species of termites that will do a great job in hollowing the log, tho they are pretty slow workers only fund in the Australian forest..

Modern western Didgeridoo Crafters use the "sandwich" technique instead of the termites - with a bandsaw the log will be split lenghtwise.... then hollowed out .. The lancelot tool became very popular in the last year for the hollowing out process..

check out modern didgeridoo crafter
http://hallowedsounds.com/index.html
That one went straight over your head eh :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok.. I decided to get one of those electric chainsaws at home depot and give it a shot. :gunsmilie:

No Chisel, no angle grinder, no hatchet and no termites could do a quicker job that a chainsaw..:no: and its fun too..

I then smothed the log with the spokeshave .. I think i can call it a didge now. The red Heartwood reveals itself on certain spots which is very attractive. Cant wait to get that ding dry.

Thanks for your help!

here are the results
 

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didges are awesome! As I was reading your post I thought about a certain device that would speed things along for you in the hollowing out process. When you split this thing after it's done drying there is a device called a chaindisk that attaches to an angle grinder. It's essentially a little chainsaw but it's in a circle. This little puppy will freaking fly when it comes to hollowing things out if you really want to go quick you can also double them up on the same angle grinder. When I first got started wood working I used it almost exclusively to hollow out bowls then used a 80 grit and so forth for the finishing touches. Here's a vid of a guy doing it with that very tool.
Anyway, beautiful piece of wood, have fun with it,
Bond
 

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Don't buy that. It's called a Lancelot. It is a very dangerous tool. a woodturner almost died from it when it got away from him and cut his throat. I have been using one for years and have the experience to use it bit if it gets away from you it's incredibly dangerous.
much safer are these.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...e_Code=packard&Category_Code=carv-kinart-gala
They don't remove wood quite as fast but do leave a much cleaner finish. If one of these gets away from you it tears at your arm pretty good. If the lancelot gets away from you it can cut your arm off.
 

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Don't buy that. It's called a Lancelot. It is a very dangerous tool. a woodturner almost died from it when it got away from him and cut his throat. I have been using one for years and have the experience to use it bit if it gets away from you it's incredibly dangerous.
much safer are these.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...e_Code=packard&Category_Code=carv-kinart-gala
They don't remove wood quite as fast but do leave a much cleaner finish. If one of these gets away from you it tears at your arm pretty good. If the lancelot gets away from you it can cut your arm off.
Ditto to what John said about the Lancelot. I have one and still use it but I almost split my index finger in two lengthwise with it. Several stitches and cut the tendon that straightens it so now it is permanently bent at the last joint and can't straighten unless I use my other hand to do it.
 

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I must respectfully disagree. I guess the way I see it it is technically safer to use a hand saw than a table saw but we use table saws to save time and be more accurate. The same is true here. Chainsaws kill people every year but we dont move back to axes. I should have however advocated the use of plenty of safety gear. Wear a helmet with protective face plate, wear gloves, secure the piece completely before you start work and move slowly until you get a feel for how it handles. SHARPEN! If it's not sharp it will start to shutter against the wood and bump up and down which is no good. Again I truly mean no disrespect here, not saying it's not dangerous just saying its like any other powertool be safe and it will be safe, just my opinion:smile: Good luck man looks to be an amazing piece let us know how it goes
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hello..

Thanks for your comments.. :thumbsup:

In the Didge-Crafting community, the Lancelot tool is brought up very often as the ultimate thing to have.. allthough i wouldnt use it myself because , hell yeah its dangerous, and also i am not in a hurry. i dont mind using handtools either. A sharp japanese gouge is actually pretty fun to work with and the finish is an artwork for its own - instead of having straight inner walls it creates these nice "waves" that to my experience have a positive effect to the sound as well.. :yes:

I like that tool John suggested.. i might get one of those - they look pretty comfi and effective. allthough a bit pricy..

Thanks,
Ceder
 
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