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Hi everybody...new here. Just retired and have started my lifelong dream of having a woodworking shop of my own here in my home. I have recently bought all of the machinery that I will need from Grizzly. That being said, with all of this new machinery, there are some things that I need to have answers for, specifically, exactly how to adjust everything before I start on a project. I'm referring mostly to my new jointer which I just can't seem to get adjusted correctly, and the manual that comes with it is not that precise on how to fine adjust it. Is the outfeed table supposed to be higher or lower than the infeed table? When I make both tables exactly level and then start my feed, the lip of my stock hangs up on the front edge of the outfeed table. I'm pulling my hair out trying to make adjustments to correct this. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks guys.
 

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help is on the way..

Please note: The jointer is not a one pass, one time, perfect result type machine. Think of it as a motorized hand plane and remove the "offending" material where it needs to be removed to gain a flat surface or a straight edge. Several light passes are usually required to bring the material to the desired condition. Sighting the board for curves and high spots will tell you where to remove material.

First, the outfeed table must be level across to the tips of the cutter head at the highest point of rotation.
The reason your workpiece is "hanging" on the outfeed table lip is probably because it's got a slight concave curve on the bottom edge. To remove the curve take a few light passes from either end by flipping the board end for end and making a partial pass then lift it off, flip it and make a new pass from the other end. See 2:17 into this:


Take a light cut under 1/16", them go up to 1/32" for the final pass.
Your "keen eye" is the best tool in the shop and you will learn to sight a board before performing any operation, jointing or ripping on the table saw, and on the router table. When using tools with a fence, the workpiece must have a straight edge to reference against the fence. The jointer is the primary tool for straightening an edge or flattening a surface. You can use other tools like a router table or a straightening jig on the table saw, but you already have the jointer, so it's the best. ;) bill
Some basics:
 
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If you dont allready have a dial indicator and a magnetic base, pick one up. They are fairly simple to use and you can set your equipment up with extreme precision. Check youtube for videos on how to set up various tools with a dial indicator. I just set up my jointer last week and was simply amazed at the precision. I set my knives 3/1000 higher than my outfeed. Thats the thickness of a sheet of paper. I dont know that woodworking tools need to be set that precise but its possible so, why not?

I also just ordered a magnetic angle cube from igaging. There was a thread recently about them. It wont help with the jointer but will make setting up some saws and other tools a breeze.

Good luck with your new shop and post up some pics of your projects!!
 
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Setting up Joiner

On my six inch table top joiner the outfeed table height is fixed and can't be changed. Only the infeed can be adjusted. For precision work I tend to take the smallest bite the settings will allow. I then use my planer to do the precision work. I don't look at the jointer as a precision instrument.
 

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On my six inch table top joiner the outfeed table height is fixed and can't be changed. Only the infeed can be adjusted. For precision work I tend to take the smallest bite the settings will allow. I then use my planer to do the precision work. I don't look at the jointer as a precision instrument.
If set up properly, the jointer is a very precise instrument. Mine is a 1970's model and also has a fixed outfeed.:yes:
 

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I'm just different I guess. I don't use fancy gauges or think in thousandths. I've always had pretty good luck with a simple set up. I first make sure both tasbles are in the same general horizontal plane. That's called "coplaner". So, if the infeed table is moved up or down it's level (so to speak) with the outfeed. The slightest differential will wreck havoc on accuracy.

My simple setup is to have the infeed table lower than the knife height for what I want to take off. IOW, if I want to take off 1/16", the infeed table is 1/16" lower than the knife height.

The outfeed table is set to the height of the knives.








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My fancy guage only cost me about 40 bucks including the base. I'm not one to typically think in thousands either. Being this was my first jointer, I had to learn how to set it up. I did that through you tube videos and reading various posts on this site. Using the dial indicator seemed like the simplest most acurate way so thats the way I learned to do it. As I said before I dont know if that type of precision is required in woodwoorking but if the machine is capable of it, why not? At the very minuimum, being a rookie woodworker, when there is a mistake, I know it's something I'm doing wrong and not machine setup.
 

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I'm just different I guess. I don't use fancy gauges or think in thousandths. I've always had pretty good luck with a simple set up. I first make sure both tables are in the same general horizontal plane. That's called "coplaner". So, if the infeed table is moved up or down it's level (so to speak) with the outfeed. The slightest differential will wreck havoc on accuracy.

My simple setup is to have the infeed table lower than the knife height for what I want to take off. IOW, if I want to take off 1/16", the infeed table is 1/16" lower than the knife height.

The outfeed table is set to the height of the knives.











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Good explanation CM. I just wanted to emphasize the emboldened portion. The parallelism of the infeed and outfeed tables is a critical check/adjustment. If you have access to a machinist's straight edge like is used to check the flatness of a cylinder head ... use it to check the tables. (first thing I check when buying a new jointer) Adjusting/tightening the gibs to ensure the table(s) are not sagging in their "ways". Shimming can be done to correct drooping, and other alignment problems... ,but if it was new, I would return it.

I also agree with (CM) that precision instuments are not necessary, though they help some people. I myself check for parallelism by jointing 2 boards and checking the fit of the jointed surface. I'll check it in 3 places, left center and right of the cutterhead. I prefer a slight "spring" joint, but that is outside of the discussion unless the OP's jointer is already cutting one.

To the OP, the other critical adjustment was mentioned by WOODNTHINGS and others, is that the outfeed table MUST match the knife height. Here it is very important to make the last adjustment by lifting/raising the table which puts tension on all of the parts while raising against gravity. A fine point, yes, but the table will hold the adjustment much better locked, or not. Of course you want to lock the adjustment. If you overshoot, back off a turn or so and bring it back up.

(OP) The video will help with technique, as will your experience, and questions to this board.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Setting up my jointer

To all who answered my call for help: A hearty thank you. I learned a little something from each and everyone of you. The gauge sounds like a nice thing to have. I never knew that there was so much instructional video on youtube. Thank you for that. Someone mentioned to post up some pics of projects, so I've done that also, or am attempting to. Having a slight problem uploading pics but will eventually figure it out. My first project was to build a workbench, obviously, and it turned out not bad I thought. So, my next project was to somehow capture all of the dust from my miter saw. This one came right from the top of my head without working from any plans. Not bad for a novice I was thinking, feeling really smug by now. So, off I go building an expandable table to cut 4x8 sheets which turned out really nice. Again, in my own opinion, of course. Really feeling that there isn't anything in my wood shop that I can't build, I get a severe kickback with a block of wood on my jointer which broke my index finger. Now I'm back down to earth. Thanks again everybody for helping out a 72 year old retired trucker who is just enjoying the hell out of life (broken finger and all).
 

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Shadykennl, I was gonna help but as often happens here, I got beat to the punch:yes:. All I can add is at 72, if you still have hair don't pull it out or your head might look like the smilies here...like mine:blink:
 
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