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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I am refinishing an Ethan Allen oak dining room table that had a serious water stain on it. The picture below shows the table top after stripping but before sanding.

I am looking for guidance on what to do next to ensure that the water stain does not show up after I stain the table. Thank you.

Gary
 

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Try sanding it. It might not be too deeply embedded into the wood and your sanding might take it out fairly quickly. I have refinished old pine but not any oak with water stains. I was fortunate enough to sand mine out with 100 grit and elbow grease.
 

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It's not that bad. If it's solid wood I would try sanding it out first. If it's veneer I believe I would try some oxalic acid in warm water on the spot first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Try sanding it. It might not be too deeply embedded into the wood and your sanding might take it out fairly quickly. I have refinished old pine but not any oak with water stains. I was fortunate enough to sand mine out with 100 grit and elbow grease.
Thank you. I plan to use a combination of the feedback that I have received.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's not that bad. If it's solid wood I would try sanding it out first. If it's veneer I believe I would try some oxalic acid in warm water on the spot first.
Steve, unfortunately it is very thin veneer which is why I was concerned about how to deal with it. I do not have any oxalic acid and will have to find out if I can get some locally. Thanks.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's not that bad. If it's solid wood I would try sanding it out first. If it's veneer I believe I would try some oxalic acid in warm water on the spot first.
Steve, oxalic acid was pretty simple to order from eBay. I used it yesterday and it did the trick. Thanks.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's not that bad. If it's solid wood I would try sanding it out first. If it's veneer I believe I would try some oxalic acid in warm water on the spot first.
Steve it all ended well. Thought you might be interested in seeing the final result. The stain is not visible but there is a minor ripple feel even after 8 wiped on top coats. Perhaps I was too aggressive with the brass brush and the oxalic acid.

Gary
 

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The table looks good however ripple feel is a disturbing term on a veneered piece. If it's dry enough tap your fingernail around the area and see if there is any different sound. The veneer may be in the early stages of failing. If the veneer is failing it will have a hollow sound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The table looks good however ripple feel is a disturbing term on a veneered piece. If it's dry enough tap your fingernail around the area and see if there is any different sound. The veneer may be in the early stages of failing. If the veneer is failing it will have a hollow sound.
Steve, your feedback is scary but still useful. I tried your suggested tapping and unfortunately there is some hollow sound.

Since this is a second dining room table for my sister-in-law it gets used only 3 or 4 times a year. Shoud I be doing anything to deal with what may be failing veneer?

Gary
 

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Steve, your feedback is scary but still useful. I tried your suggested tapping and unfortunately there is some hollow sound.

Since this is a second dining room table for my sister-in-law it gets used only 3 or 4 times a year. Shoud I be doing anything to deal with what may be failing veneer?

Gary
You have the finish on it now. Unless the table is going hundreds of miles from you I would leave it alone. It would involve cutting through the veneer and lifting it up enough to run super glue under the veneer. If it all possible I would just wait until it gets worse before doing that.

What you are going to have to do refurbishing antiques is to go over them taping you fingernails on veneered pieces. It's best to find out anyway before you strip them because sometimes just the stripping process can make the veneer buckle. Its often better if the veneer is loose to glue it down before putting stripper on it.
 

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I have read of using CA glue and a hypodermic syringe to fix delaminated veneer .
It works great when the wood is raw wood. I started out using a hypodermic syringe but you had to make a hole in the wood that ended up looking like a nail hole. It didn't seem to do a very large area either and often had to make many holes to get the job done. One day I was out of syringes so I just took a utility knife and slit the veneer with the grain. I then used an artist spatula to lift the veneer up to where I could squirt the glue right out of the tube under the veneer. Then I used a hot iron to force dry it. (one safety note: don't let the smoke from the heated super glue get in your eyes) Innitially it made an ugly line where I slit the veneer and glued it down but when the wood was sanded the line disappeared and you couldn't tell there was ever a repair done. I haven't used a syringe since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You have the finish on it now. Unless the table is going hundreds of miles from you I would leave it alone. It would involve cutting through the veneer and lifting it up enough to run super glue under the veneer. If it all possible I would just wait until it gets worse before doing that.

What you are going to have to do refurbishing antiques is to go over them taping you fingernails on veneered pieces. It's best to find out anyway before you strip them because sometimes just the stripping process can make the veneer buckle. Its often better if the veneer is loose to glue it down before putting stripper on it.
Steve, yet another lesson learned. Thanks. In fact this table is going hundrerds of miles away to a sister-in-law but I get to see her a couple times a year and will be able to keep tabs on what is happening.

Gary
 

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Steve, yet another lesson learned. Thanks. In fact this table is going hundrerds of miles away to a sister-in-law but I get to see her a couple times a year and will be able to keep tabs on what is happening.

Gary
How much trouble would it be to get the table back to your shop if it did go bad? If it's a nightmare you might consider going ahead and fixing it and get it overwith. I don't think I would attempt to repair the table there. I could involve taking the finish off again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
How much trouble would it be to get the table back to your shop if it did go bad? If it's a nightmare you might consider going ahead and fixing it and get it overwith. I don't think I would attempt to repair the table there. I could involve taking the finish off again.

Steve it would not be a nightmare just a nuisance so I will live with the issue and hope that it never really becomes a major problem. Thanks.

Gary
 
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