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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am curious if anyone has done segmented turnings with clear pieces imbedded? If so, was it an epoxy or similar product? I really need it to be crystal clear and able to turn it like any wood piece. The piece I will be making will have both wood and these clear pieces. Therefore, I have to cast the piece which that is why I am looking for an epoxy like product. Let me know. Thx
 

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You didn't say much about design, so I'll jump in where I know absolutely nothing with an idea at which I'm pretty good; GLASS! Yeah, I know, what kind of an idiot would suggest such a thing. Well, hear me out.

I used to make my living working in glass and found a way to polish glass that's actually pretty easy. Assuming we aren't talking about taking off huge pieces, Glass polishes about the same as wood. Anyone that does crushed stone inlay will tell you the same thing. Taking a piece of sand paper and rubbing glass will put in scratches just like it does in wood. And you can remove them the same way; by going down to a finer grit. In glass, I go down to about 3000 on diamond pads and then buff with jewelry rouge on a muslin pad. Works pretty good.

So, if you have a piece of glass added to your wood project, plan to do more polishing, but you'll get the same results, if you go far enough.

And there's the rub (excuse the pun), you have to keep at it, and keep at it, and keep at it. Try it will a small piece first and see what you think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
revjerry said:
You didn't say much about design, so I'll jump in where I know absolutely nothing with an idea at which I'm pretty good; GLASS! Yeah, I know, what kind of an idiot would suggest such a thing. Well, hear me out. I used to make my living working in glass and found a way to polish glass that's actually pretty easy. Assuming we aren't talking about taking off huge pieces, Glass polishes about the same as wood. Anyone that does crushed stone inlay will tell you the same thing. Taking a piece of sand paper and rubbing glass will put in scratches just like it does in wood. And you can remove them the same way; by going down to a finer grit. In glass, I go down to about 3000 on diamond pads and then buff with jewelry rouge on a muslin pad. Works pretty good. So, if you have a piece of glass added to your wood project, plan to do more polishing, but you'll get the same results, if you go far enough. And there's the rub (excuse the pun), you have to keep at it, and keep at it, and keep at it. Try it will a small piece first and see what you think.
I am going to turn a segmented bowl. First, I don't have the ability to heat up glass and pour it into a specific shape. Second, when I put it on a lathe, I don't think my bowl gouge tool will be very kind to glass. Ha
 

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I will ponder that. Recently, I turned down an old flute and went over the area where the finger holes are with no difficulty. So I suppose it has to do with the size of the opening.

Glass won't worry your bowl gouge much. You will scratch it, of course, but that's what the sanding process is about.

Lets step back and think about this one.
 

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I know next to nothing about segmenting but would your design lend itself to leaving voids where the clear pieces go, then using a pour type epoxy to fill them? The bar top epoxies should work if you follow the instructions and keep the bubbles out. Getting a glass like finish after turning it will take some work but it's possible. Sounds like a cool project. Keep us posted.
 

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Clear casting resin works great. You can buy it at Hobby LObby and places like that. It turns wlll if you don't force the cut. Sharpen your tools and take light cuts. Then you have to sand to at least 1200 grit and then I use automotive polishes to polish it to a glass surface.
You do have to make a dam of some sort to keep it from running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
john lucas said:
Clear casting resin works great. You can buy it at Hobby LObby and places like that. It turns wlll if you don't force the cut. Sharpen your tools and take light cuts. Then you have to sand to at least 1200 grit and then I use automotive polishes to polish it to a glass surface. You do have to make a dam of some sort to keep it from running.
Thx. You prefer this over an epoxy? Does it shrink? Is the strength there to hold the bond between wood on either side?
 

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I have never used Casting resin as a bonding agent. Neither have I use Inlace. I've only used them to fill voids. If you want to use it as a glue I would stick with the System 3 Mirror coat, or West System epoxy 105 resin with the 209 hardener. These both dry clear and turn well, and are bonding resins.
 

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Why not just use clear acrylic? You can buy plenty of acrylic pen kits and it turns just fine (though feels different than wood, I'm told). You can also pour it yourself, with the right kits/tools to make your own molds, I believe.
 

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Thx. You prefer this over an epoxy? Does it shrink? Is the strength there to hold the bond between wood on either side?
If you are bonding this to wood alumilite is supposed to bond to wood way better than polyresin. It has a clear variety so you should be good with this if you can find a way to cast it in.
 

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No, you can't turn glass like we do wood. There are ways to do it but it requires a propane/oxygen torch and VERY specialized tools.

Small pieces in a segmented bowl, however, shouldn't be any more problem than traditional inlay. They would be more awkward to sand, but still work the same. I've done a fair amount of inlay in flute bodies and sanded them down about like I do the rest of the flute without much fanfare. But, that WAS inlay; crushed stone or glass, and not a large piece of glass. Guess we're in uncharted waters.

Some of the ideas about using epoxy sound a lot better to me. Pretty easy to pour and keep in place with tape and cardboard. Too cold out side to get to the wood shop, so I'll go away and ponder all this. The more I think about it, the less I like the idea of a large segment in a turning. But then I don't know what I'm talking about most of the time.
 

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I imagine you will be making segmented rings and glueing rings on top of the last to make your bowl. As long as you don't put your clear segments in the top ring, they will be sandwhiched on 4 sides. If there's any chance of them staying that will be it.
 
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