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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All!

This is my first post here, and I'm excited to be a part of the community. I've been enjoying snooping around here for a few weeks, and you all have some great insights.

I'm relatively new to woodworking, and am getting tasked by my wife to build a shelving/cabinet system in our laundry room, in order to justify the cost of all of my new tools/toys.

Does anybody have a good recommendation on a book, or set of books, to help me get on my way and get this project going? Something I can get some ideas from, and reference later?

Thanks all! I look forward to getting your thoughts!

DRoy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, I went with the Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture and Cabinet Construction, per your recommendation. I also ordered The Complete Manual of Woodworking. Being relatively new to the hobby, I was browsing through this book, and I found myself learning a lot of things that I feel I should already know, or at least, things that I NEED to know going forward.

Anyone read this one? Thoughts? Well-invested, or should I return it?
 

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Let me mention three other books that should be in any new or experienced woodworker's library.

Understanding Wood by Bruce Hoadley

Understanding Wood Finishing by Bob Flexner

Illustrated Cabinetmaking by Bill Hylton - This book may be out of print but is well worthwhile trying to get
 

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I found these two books to be pretty good.
Amazon.com: The Complete Kitchen Cabinetmaker: Shop Drawings and Professional Methods for Designing and Constructing Every Kind of Kitchen and Built-In Cabinet (9781892836229): Robert W. Lang: Books

Shelves Cabinets & Bookcases: Fine Woodworking, Fine Homebuilding: 9781600850493: Amazon.com: Books

The first one has all black and white pictures though which was the only downside for me. And it only focuses on kitchen cabinets so that might not be what you're looking for.
 

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Welcome DRoy - That is quite the question as we all have our favorite "woodworking bible"... mine is is Illustrated Cabinetmaking by Bill Hylton. You could check your local library for a few samples.

A few tips for all beginners:

Try building a few shop projects like a simple work bench and a few shop cabinets and work stations. As you build these, start with simple joints and progress as you go. We more experienced woodworkers still make mistakes but we have the experience to know how to hide these mistakes. A flawed cabinet will look better in your shop then your living room as long as it is functional. I love showing folks my 1st cabinet in my workshop. It reminds me how far I've progressed.

Don't throw out your scraps of wood. Use them to practice your joinery.

Understand that there is more then one way to accomplish a particular task so when you ask a question you will get several different answers and they may all be correct. You will need to figure which method works best for you.

Be safe and have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Welcome DRoy - That is quite the question as we all have our favorite "woodworking bible"... mine is is Illustrated Cabinetmaking by Bill Hylton. You could check your local library for a few samples.

A few tips for all beginners:

Try building a few shop projects like a simple work bench and a few shop cabinets and work stations. As you build these, start with simple joints and progress as you go. We more experienced woodworkers still make mistakes but we have the experience to know how to hide these mistakes. A flawed cabinet will look better in your shop then your living room as long as it is functional. I love showing folks my 1st cabinet in my workshop. It reminds me how far I've progressed.

Don't throw out your scraps of wood. Use them to practice your joinery.

Understand that there is more then one way to accomplish a particular task so when you ask a question you will get several different answers and they may all be correct. You will need to figure which method works best for you.

Be safe and have fun!
Thanks for the welcome! I'm going to make sure to stop by the intro board and say hi to everyone.

I came across Hylton's book a lot in my search, and am slightly regretting not including it in my order from Amazon, but I'll definitely check my local library.

As for the "practicing" on shop furniture, I think this is very good advice. My new TS is sitting on a very unstable metal frame given to me by the guy from whom I bought it, so I was hoping to get going on a more comprehensive TS stand/router table combo. I was hoping to do this with construction lumber and MDF, with simple joinery (primarily half-lap) in order to practice some fundamentals. This project will definitely come before the cabinet build, but I'm getting pressure from SWMBO to get going on the cabinets, so I'm trying to get the design underway, and let her waffle on issues like cabinet color/finish while I work on my fundamentals a bit.

Thanks for the help and advice! Let me know if you have anything else to have.... I'm a sponge at this point.
 

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All good stuff above!

Also,when you are doing "practice" joints on your shop storage/stands,whatever....you are infact developing your tool inventory,amongst other things.

But that's not the reason for response......You can and "should" be applying finish to these accessories.For the same reasons you were practicing the "builds".....you can work out some of the finish materials/tools/techniques.The shop environ is way more harsh(scratches/bruises)on finishes than they'll see elsewhere....so is an effective test environ.Best of luck.
 
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