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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'm interested in learning how to building British Campaign Furniture. This is furniture that's built to collapse or break down. Tables, chairs, writing desks, Dressers, etc. Furniture that could be packed up into square boxes and packed onto your elephant or camel and hauled off to your next campsite, where you would set up and feel like you've never left jolly old England. All the comforts and style of home (if you lived in England in the 1800's).

The really cool part of this type of furniture is that, as there were no banks and little security on the trail, there were usually several hidden compartments and drawers concealed in the furniture. This is the part that really interests me.

Anyone have any information on where I could find plans for this type of furniture?
 

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sorry bradleyb could`nt find any plans as such but i think you would be interested in this book its got good reviews too,also heres a link for you showing different pieces. hope they help.
 

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That is interesting. I never even knew the genre existed, but knowing the British, who will literally stop a war for 30 minutes to have their tea, I should have known they'd take along their own furnishings when conquering other lands. :laughing:
 

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Thank vinnyb76,

I've read that book - it's fascinating stuff but more along the lines of eye candy and less about how they were built. Also, that's the ONLY book I've found on the subject.

It's really cool stuff.

BTW - my in laws are from the UK and a well brewed tea is very important in my house.
 

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I think U.S. Americans are one of the few cultures who have never been tea freaks. Asian, East Indian, Slavic, even most European coultures have a tea tradition.

We in the U.S. south do have to have our iced tea in the summer. If you order tea in Texas you are going to get it iced. Hot tea is foreign. If you go very far north and ask for tea, and the waitress hears your southern accent she will clarify "You mean ice tea?" Like it is some kind of poison. Because up north they do have some folks who will take hot tea, but usually it is coffee in the states.

I wonder why the tea tradition was not sustained when our English forefathers started our fine little amalgamated country?

I also wonder how coffee gained the foothold over tea when having tea was what our forefathers were reared on.?

I am having the last cup of the late morning right now. it is about my 6th or 7th cup since 5 a.m. Coffee that is. I never have seen the draw in a hot cup of tea, but I ain't knockin it so no offense to you tea toadlers.
 

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Yeah boston tea party,Ya think:yes: There is a good Monty Python sketch about British officers in the African Campain.I think it was The Meaning of Life.Very funny.As for hidden compartments,costumers love them,even simple ones.It makes the piece seem special and unique.Something they're not going to get in a store.
 

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heres a link to show you what you`ve been missing:smile: .

I do drink other beverages other than tea like beer erm....water and mmmm......im thinking...........beer,water and..........................ok mainly tea:thumbsup:.
 

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I wonder if that Little "Tea Party" in Boston had something with the tradition disappearing..........
I'm thinking pretty strongly that your little tea party in Boston Harbour had a lot to do with the tradition largely disappearing. In Canada tea is still a popular beverage, particularly in areas that have had a strong British influence. I am a coffee drinker myself, but only in the morning. In the afternoon it becomes beer.

Gerry:thumbsup:
 

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That's an interesting site vinny. Thanks.

I lived in Japan for three years from 1968 through 1970. I was age 9 through 11 there so i soaked up the cutlture. My sister who is two years my senior and smarter than me too (she would be shocked to hear me admit it but she will never see this :laughing: ) was even quicker to pick up the language. I always got more attention though because I had stark raving blond hair. To rub my head was good luck for a Japanese and after a few months I was so used to it I never even paid it any mind. But we were communicating with them fluently within 6 months, and my parents used to take us to the genza (market) as interpreters. That's where I learned to become a salesman, and also where I learned to deal with people eye to eye, without becoming intimidated, and it is also in large part where I learned to respect someone even though you are basically in the midst of "combat" so to speak. In Japan, and I lived in what was essentially "old" Japan not the new Wetsrn Japan which I hate, bartering was a tradition which utilized tactics similiar to any competition such as Jujitsu. Not physically of course but that was the mindset they take when dealing over even a pack of gum. I did not know this consciously at that time but I learned it and employed the same strategies I was being taught OJT. they take everything seriously even their partying when they cut loose at the end of the day.

Sorry fellas that was a tangent I didn't mean to take. I didn't take my Adderall until about 10 minutes ago it hasn't kicked in yet. Anyhow, the point I was going to make before I typed all that unecessary filler that I could delete but won't because i invested 10 minutes of my life into it, was that I assure you Europeans, you guys take your tea casually compared to the Japanese. The tea ceremony in Japan is religion practically and the drinking of it is second to the preperation and serving.
 

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Andrew Close
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Hello all,

I'm interested in learning how to building British Campaign Furniture. This is furniture that's built to collapse or break down. Tables, chairs, writing desks, Dressers, etc. Furniture that could be packed up into square boxes and packed onto your elephant or camel and hauled off to your next campsite, where you would set up and feel like you've never left jolly old England. All the comforts and style of home (if you lived in England in the 1800's).

The really cool part of this type of furniture is that, as there were no banks and little security on the trail, there were usually several hidden compartments and drawers concealed in the furniture. This is the part that really interests me.
Bradley B

i just saw the recently released 'National Treasure - Book of Secrets', if you haven't seen it, you'll like a couple scenes. ;)
There's some furniture with your hidden compartments in it. very cool
 

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I don't know why we aren't avid tea drinkers but I did watch an episode about coffee on the History Channel. It seems before the industrial revolution, workers were drinking beer or wine throughout the day as the water wasn't very good or healthy. When coffee finally became popular, company owners pushed it and even allowed "breaks" to drink the stuff. Before, the employees were a little on the lazy side as they might be tipsy. Coffee on the other hand had the reverse effect and made the employees more productive. There was also a drastic decline in job related injuries.
 

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Andrew Close
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I don't know why we aren't avid tea drinkers but I did watch an episode about coffee on the History Channel. It seems before the industrial revolution, workers were drinking beer or wine throughout the day as the water wasn't very good or healthy. When coffee finally became popular, company owners pushed it and even allowed "breaks" to drink the stuff. Before, the employees were a little on the lazy side as they might be tipsy. Coffee on the other hand had the reverse effect and made the employees more productive. There was also a drastic decline in job related injuries.
Modern Marvels - Excellent program ;)
 

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Andrew Close
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PBS - The Woodright's Workshop recently had an episode featuring a couple cabinetmakers from the eastern states. they detailed the build of an 'antique' walnut fliptop desk (?). it had several secret compartments in it. the joinery was pretty awesome. well, the whole project was rather awesome, but i figured you'd be especially interested in the secret compartments. ;)
 

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Andrew Close
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ok, i've got another one. :smile:
last night i was playing with iTunes and searched for 'Woodworking' PodCasts. there are actually quite a few, so i downloaded a couple to check out. one of them that i watched, Matt's Workshop i believe, was in the middle of building an antique secretary similar to the one discussed above on the PBS show 'The Woodwright's Shop'. the guy on this particular PodCast didn't do any woodworking, he was mainly planning out the details of his next steps, but it was interesting and mildly entertaining. anyway, looking through his other episodes i saw 'secret compartments'. so i'm guessing he's building compartments into his secretary as well. it might be worth checking out if only for ideas...
 

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One very simple secret compartment is a hidden drawer under the standard drawer. You raise the bottom of the drawer up a little, then build a small drawer that opens from the back panel underneath.
 
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