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HSpencer
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80 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Too cold around here to do much, so taking the time to rebuild my old
1970's Craftsman Table Saw. First thing was to put it on wheels, so using Kreg Casters and some old bed rail, I made it mobile. Next will be to build a holder on the left side for a crosscut sled, and one on the right side for the fence, miter gauge, a square, and tape measures. Then, I am going to take the saw off the base, and clean it thoroughly, and reset the blade to table accuracy. Finally, I will repaint it, roughly the original color, and paint the rails red. I will install a Freud 54 tooth carbide blade for butter smooth cuts. I am keeping the saw the same height as my router table, as I use them side by side. This saw has served me well, and once it is redone, it should be like a new one. When the casters are locked, the saw does NOT move. Unlocked, I can move it with my little finger!! It is sooo nice not to have to use a 2 wheeler to move the saw, or worse, man handle it.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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8,046 Posts
Looks like you've got a plan. Can I ask a few questions though?

1. Why a 9 inch blade? I can't tell for sure but that looks like a 10 inch saw.

2. Have you considered a fence upgrade??
 

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HSpencer
Joined
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80 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Sounds like a good cold-weather project. Keep us posted.
Thanks. Yes I will. There is a lot of work yet to do, as I want to totally
clean and refurbish the saw.

Best Regards
Herb Spencer
 

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HSpencer
Joined
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80 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Looks like you've got a plan. Can I ask a few questions though?

1. Why a 9 inch blade? I can't tell for sure but that looks like a 10 inch saw.

2. Have you considered a fence upgrade??
Thanks for your reply. It actually is a Craftsman 9 inch Motorized Saw.
I bought it around 1978. The better saws were the 10" with cast iron tables and driven with a belt and motor. I wish mine was a 10", but this one has not failed me. It did bog down once in hardwood, but it was due to a dull blade.
The fence works ok, but I am looking at upgrades. I have several wooden jigs to attach to the stock fence that do what I need usually.

Thanks for your interest!

Best Regards
Herb Spencer
 

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where's my table saw?
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28,598 Posts
I understand, however...

Thanks. Yes I will. There is a lot of work yet to do, as I want to totally
clean and refurbish the saw.

Best Regards
Herb Spencer
Thanks for your reply. It actually is a Craftsman 9 inch Motorized Saw.
I bought it around 1978. The better saws were the 10" with cast iron tables and driven with a belt and motor. I wish mine was a 10", but this one has not failed me. It did bog down once in hardwood, but it was due to a dull blade.
The fence works ok, but I am looking at upgrades. I have several wooden jigs to attach to the stock fence that do what I need usually.

Thanks for your interest!

Best Regards
Herb Spencer
I really wouldn't put more than time and effort into this saw. If it's a labor of love, then great, but for a woodworking tool it's on the lower limits. The 10" belt drive, cast iron table is a better saw, but you may still need a fence upgrade. I had one myself, it lasted 40 some years and made my own upgrade a longggg .... time ago. Then I got a whole new fence, a Delta Unifence now discontined, and have much happier ever since.
It may just fine for your needs and use, but that's up to you. :yes:
 

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HSpencer
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80 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I really wouldn't put more than time and effort into this saw. If it's a labor of love, then great, but for a woodworking tool it's on the lower limits. The 10" belt drive, cast iron table is a better saw, but you may still need a fence upgrade. I had one myself, it lasted 40 some years and made my onw upgrade a longggg .... time ago. Then I got a whole new fence, a Delta Unifence now discontined, and have much happier ever since.
It may just fine for your needs and use, but that's up to you. :yes:
Thanks for your reply. I most likely won't do much more than a good clean up and casters and blade. I have looked at newer saws, but I am fond of this one, and it pretty well does what I need it to do. Were I a furniture builder or professional woodworker, I would go for a Delta saw, probably the contractor's style. I am more into home repair type stuff.

Best Regards
Herb Spencer
 
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