Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
About a year ago, I attempted to improve the DC on my TS. I documented it in this thread. Now, after a year of using it, I feel I should have done something different, so I am doing it now.


I decided to change up my DC on my TS. I have been working a lot more with cutting beveled edges on various pieces, and removing/reinstalling the aluminum cover I made for back of my Craftsman contractor type TS was getting to be a real pain. Since I wanted to cut more bevels, I thought I would build an enclosure around the motor that was hanging out the rear of my saw.

I figured I would just post the pics, and if you have any questions, ask away.
DSC06869.jpg

DSC06870.jpg

DSC06871.jpg

DSC06877.jpg

DSC06875.jpg
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
27,880 Posts
great ideas!

Looks like the enclosure will become an outfeed table also. Cool!
:thumbsup:
 
  • Like
Reactions: thegrgyle

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
DSC06893.jpg

Below is the inspector that has been watching the build and making sure that it is up to HIS specifications.

DSC06895.jpg

DSC06896.jpg

DSC06898.jpg

Well, Now all I have to do is trim off the laminate, chamfer the edges, and then route the grooves for the miter gauge slots. Then I just need to put a back panel on it (that I will be able to remove if I need to maintain the motor). I might also incorporate a folding outfeed extension too, but that may not happen for awhile..... at least till I need it.

Hope you liked it.
 

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Looks like the enclosure will become an outfeed table also. Cool!
:thumbsup:
Thanks, Bill. You snuck in your comment before I was done uploading pics... Thanks for the compliment though. It means alot! :yes: :icon_smile:

As I was building it, I thought it would be good to make it an outfeed as well. It may not be long enough, but I figure I could also add a folding extension to this if need be.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
27,880 Posts
a tip for making the grooves

When I made my outfeed table I used 1/2" MDF in 3 separate pieces, right, center and left.
I made 3/4" wide strips that I fit into the grooves, then butted my separate pieces against them with a shim to allow for free travel then I screwed them in place. That way they were exactly in the correct location and the correct width, no measuring or routing....:blink:
 
  • Like
Reactions: thegrgyle

·
Trytore Member
Joined
·
2,763 Posts
Looks great Fabian. I'm sure that will help you out a lot. Nice weekend to be making sawdust with the garage door open eh? :thumbsup:
 

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
OH dad, you hit the nail on the head. My "inspector" loved it too, since he was able to get outside. He gets bored sometimes in the shop, so when I can have the garage door open, he is in absolute heaven. He thoroughly enjoys the outdoors, and the garage is #2 on his list.

There is also something nice when you have a nice breeze help clear away the "dusty air"

Only thing that sucks about this nicer weather, is that it outdoor projects take up a lot of my time.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
Thanks for posting. Interesting build. Well executed. :thumbsup:

Creative solution to the problem of dust collection on a contractor style table saw. I love when a project solves multiple problems, or provides additional features. You get better dust collection and a useful outfeed support section.

I have a big outfeed extension on my saw. I would not want to use my saw without this extension. I can make cuts without worrying about trying to catch the piece before it falls off the table.

I would make a mental note to periodically blow out the dust from the motor. The open design of the motor rotor is likely to collect more dust due to the enclosure.
 

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for posting. Interesting build. Well executed. :thumbsup:

Creative solution to the problem of dust collection on a contractor style table saw. I love when a project solves multiple problems, or provides additional features. You get better dust collection and a useful outfeed support section.

I have a big outfeed extension on my saw. I would not want to use my saw without this extension. I can make cuts without worrying about trying to catch the piece before it falls off the table.

I would make a mental note to periodically blow out the dust from the motor. The open design of the motor rotor is likely to collect more dust due to the enclosure.
Thanks for your kind comments!

I'm really hoping that I do get good DC with this addition. My fear is that the dust would build up around the motor, and do some damage somehow. That is the reason why I originally went with the aluminum block off. Now my "laziness" has outweighed the concerns I had, but they are still concerns.

The back of this enclosure will be removable, so that I can blow it out occasionally. I blew it out for the first time yesterday, and couldn't believe the amount of dust that came out of the motor housing! :eek: :thumbdown:

I have also wanted an outfeed table of some sort ever since I bought the saw. When I started, we were parking 2 cars in the garage, so I didn't see how I would do this without a great deal of effort, so I came up with the solution pictured below. It is just a clampable roller stand to put on the table behind the saw.

DSC06908.jpg

It has worked most of the time, but certainly has its downfalls. Ideally, I am planning on making a table behind the saw that is the same height for use as an outfeed table. The table I currently have is way too large for what I need right now. However, I also have plans to make a better base for my TS, and want to do that first.

So many plans, and so little time.... Well, speaking of that, I have to get out to the garage and try to finish at least one of my current projects.
 

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Well, I got the enclosure/outfeed table finished. I had a heck of a time routing out those grooves. :wallbash::furious: Its too bad I didn't consider what Bill (woodnthings) said about using the spacers and separate pieces. :yes: Wish I would have thought of that. I think I was trying to hog out too much at one time. :thumbdown: Then when I thought I was finished, but turns out I didn't route the grooves wide enough. My osbourne miter gauge has a little disc that keep the miter gauge in is slot, and rides in the wider portion of the miter gauge slot (along the bottom of it). :censored: When I went to advance my miter gauge, it got stuck. :cursing: I had to widen the grooves about a 1/16" on both side of each groove.

DSC06911.jpg

DSC06912.jpg

DSC06913.jpg

DSC06914.jpg

Time will tell how well this works out. One thing is for sure.... I will be real glad to have that little bit of an outfeed table. :yes:
 

·
I wood if I could.
Joined
·
3,976 Posts
If nothing else, it looks nice and provides workpiece support. I'm sure it'll improve the dust collection too. Let us know how it works out.

It looks great :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
You seem to have very nicely solved the issues those of us who have contractor's saws have with dust collection. I had once tried to enclose the back but leave the motor exposed. I went through a lot of cardboard mock-ups before accepting the fact that, once you put a bevel on the cut, the complexity of the design (when trying to keep the motor exposed) increases exponentially.

I'm anxious to hear how efficient your design is for collecting dust. The TS is the one tool in my shop that seriously needs DC improvements. Your design may be the answer. Thanks for sharing! :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
this is really nice. can't wait to see how efficient it is at collecting dust by the motor. also, nice touch on the beveling motor cut out. i know i would have forgotten that.
 

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Well, back to the drawing board for the DC.....

Well, it has been 2 weeks since I finished up this project and contintued on with my wifes recipe box. My table saw has seen heavy use during these two weeks. First of all, I LOVE THE OUTFEED portion of this improvement. I don't know how I got along without it.

When I was changing a blade yesterday, I happened to look inside the TS, and didn't like what I found. :blink: This is what I saw. I'm sorry if this pic isn't that good....

DSC06982.jpg

What you see in the above pic, is above the baby blue metal and black ducttape, is a PILE of sawdust in the motor compartment that I blocked off. I then opened up the back panel, and the pic below explains it all. :eek: :thumbdown:

DSC06984.jpg

So I have already envisioned what I am going to do next, which is to make a metal "funnel" under that motor compartment, that will feed a DC connection. I had a feeling that what I had done with the bottom of that compartment didn't have enough pitch.

I then vacuumed out all the dust in that compartment, and then blew out/vacuumed out the motor itself. After I am done with my wifes recipe box, this is #1 on my list to fix.
 

·
master sawdust maker
Joined
·
437 Posts
There may be another option to try first, DC need to draw as much air as they are pulling, You may try to open up a hole in the opposite side of the enclosure then where the DC port is, I see you are pulling air from under the saw and from around the motor. The problem could be you do not have enough air flow to keep the dust airborne until it gets sucked into the DC port.

Just a thought.
 
  • Like
Reactions: thegrgyle

·
master sawdust maker
Joined
·
437 Posts
forgot to add this.

Its like the vacuum cleaner in the house when the hose gets clogged and you look in the swirling chamber thingy and the stuff is just kinda sittin there...... then when you unclog the hose and it all starts whippin around like a mini tornado!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: thegrgyle

·
Hobbyist wood-butcher
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
There may be another option to try first, DC need to draw as much air as they are pulling, You may try to open up a hole in the opposite side of the enclosure then where the DC port is, I see you are pulling air from under the saw and from around the motor. The problem could be you do not have enough air flow to keep the dust airborne until it gets sucked into the DC port.

Just a thought.
:thumbsup: You bring up a great point, and one that did cross my mind, but it failed to stay there. :blink: I think I will try drilling a few holes by the other end and see if that helps. I could always fill those with caulk if they don't seem to be effective.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top