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I'm restoring an old table and have have reglued some of the boards, but not a perfect mating. Is there any kind of glue or filler that would work for this? Or should I just stain and varnish and hope that would conceal the seams. The seams are only very slight--no big cracks.
 

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I like using a wood filler called Famowood for stuff like that. In the wood flooring business, Timbermate is hot for filling cracks and grain. Elmers also makes a wood filler. You can buy all three listed above in the wood species that your table is.

Here is a link to what I use most. http://www.redhillgeneralstore.com/A33390.htm
 

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In my opinion, filling would be recommended. Even with several coats of varnish, a slight gap will most likely still show. I usually use a acetone based filler, mostly because it dries fast (5 minutes or so) and will take stain well. I think it is called "pro-fill?" which most hardware stores carry. If it's too pasty you can always add more acetone to thin it out. Have also used some of the floor filler that Dave mentioned, which worked well also, had a very thin consistancy to it and matched the wood well.
 

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This has kinda been bugging me today. I know you asked about filling the seams, but if you are restoring and want to do it right, why don't you re-rip and glue the boards up properly? Something about an incorrect edge joint that has joint failure written all over it.
I'm not trying to be smart...just askin'
 

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I thought the same thing Rob but didn't want to ask. It sounded to me though like he did re-rip the boards but just didn't get a perfect fit down the entire length or maybe a little chipping here and there. Just my guess.
 

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it would be better if you provided a picture, However, I find that in filling cracks or crevices if you can find a matching wood or can sand some from an inconspicious spot (like underneath) you can then mix the sawdust with carpenters glue ( making your own filler) and then use it to fill the gap. I use this technique and find it a very good match usually in small crevices. ( Hope this idea helps)
 
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