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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I've just starting woodturning with a 25 year old lathe and wood from my garden. Most of my wood is not well dried out, some has just been cut, and is mainly Oak from a dead tree & Olive. It struck me after turning my first pen blank and finishing it with a CA glue finish that this waterproof finish wood effectively stop the wood from drying out any further. I appreciate that a pen hasn't actually got much wood in it, so I've turned a large goblet from Olive wood and applied a CA finish all over to both make the goblet waterproof and to stop any warping or cracking from the wood drying out.
I can't find any more info about CA glue finishes being used in this way, to create a lifetime sealant, does anyone else have any more experience, info or opinion about this?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Anyone, Bueller.....

Has no-one got any experience sealing with CA? I've attached a photo of my first goblet to drum up a little interest. A little gaudy perhaps, and I didn't make the sides very thin as I've only got three chisels, but I think the wood is amazing, if only I could do it justice.
 

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David
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Welcome to the forum! Add your location to your profile so it shows in the side panel. Add your first name to your signature line so we'll know what to call you.

The wood in that goblet is beautiful! I'm in a woodworking club and a couple of the guys use CA to finish their work. One of them did a video and I don't think he'll mind it being posted here -


David
 

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I saw your post and thought about it. I am waiting for more experienced people to respond. I have done many CA finishes on small, dry wood, like pens and small handles. I never tried it on green wood. I have some green wood from a downed branch, but I cut it into rough pen blanks and have let them dry for many months. The should be ready for when I have the time.

My initial thought was that trapping the green wood inside the CA might not work as well as you think. Nothing is impervious. I believe that the wood will change within the CA over time anyway. It might pull away from the CA or cause it to crack. It might release moisture within the CA, spoiling the finish. It might work; you never know. I will wait and see what others say.

The traditional approach to woodturning green wood is to rough turn it, then let it sit and dry for a while, maybe years, depending on the size. After it distorts and stabilizes, you turn the final product, eliminating the distortions. I have seen rough cut green wood bowls that distorted so much over time that they could not be turned round any more.
 

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I don’t believe there is any finish, waterproof or not, that will keep a wood from changing with seasons. Maybe if you totally encapsulate it with 1/4 inch of something, but generally, I think your reasoning is flawed.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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David
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In the mid 80's and early 90's when I had a woodworking business designing custom furniture, doing restorations, etc. I had a sign in my office and that sign read - "There are two rules to wood movement; Rule #1 is that wood moves. Rule #2 is that you and I can't change Rule #1"

I think that's still true. :wink:

David
 

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I will be honest and say I don't know the answer to your question. I do know you should turn dry wood if you are going to turn it to completion. You can buy some nice 2 x 4's and cut them to length and glue two of them together to make a small bowl.

This is about the first bowl I turned and it's a pine 2x4 or a 2x6 I forget which.

 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi guys, thanks for your thoughts on this. I haven't got the patience ( or stock of wood ) to rough out a blank then leave it for a year! Luckily the oak tree I cut down must have dead for a few years, so hopefully that's dried out a little, also, some of the olive wood has been sitting for nearly a year so hopefully that will have lost some moisture. It will be interesting to see how things move with the fully coated CA goblets, a few of my early experiments, that have epoxy resin in them to fill the ant holes, haven't cracked or warped, but you can see that the epoxy is being squeezed out as the wood shrinks around it.
I think I'm lucky with having olive wood as it is really hard and quite oily, I douse it in walnut oil continually and then finish with bees wax and walnut oil to try and seal it a little which may be helping. It looks like I'm heading down the more rustic looking side of woodworking, with live edges, bark, splits and holes appealing to me, so a little warping won't go amiss. I'm not a big fan of the super shiny CA finish as the wood looks too plasticy, but I wanted the goblets to be functional and waterproof so I thought I'd try it, hopefully it won't crack over time. Goblet No.2 is a bit more natural looking...
 

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