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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

Looking to add a few draw knives to my collection, or one good one. I'm interested in getting into traditional boat building, carving, and shaping.

Lots of them on ebay, some more expensive than others. Some looking a bit sweaty. Then there are the veritas offerings which seem pricey.

Suggestions?

Thanks!
 

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veritas are pricy I have about 10 different ones here from different makers all about the same keep them sharp an all will do the job for you, remember there is different styles of draw knifes also an each has a different purpose
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I noticed the obvious curved versus straight blades but others seemed to have an actual profile of the blade itself. Wondering what the purpose of that was, perhaps a different angle?

And how mangled a blade is feasible to salvage?
 

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If it can be sharpened an still have meat on it should be good to go , what kind are you looking for I have several in the shop that I don't use
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If it can be sharpened an still have meat on it should be good to go , what kind are you looking for I have several in the shop that I don't use
I think a straight and a curved knife in user condition would suit me just fine if you're interested in parting with them!

Just trying to do some homework first.

I was looking at this ad, see the side profile on the top knife? It almost has an 'U' to it. Wondering if that was for a specific purpose.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Dra...179?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20d63d8bcb
 

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I think a straight and a curved knife in user condition would suit me just fine if you're interested in parting with them!

Just trying to do some homework first.

I was looking at this ad, see the side profile on the top knife? It almost has an 'U' to it. Wondering if that was for a specific purpose.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Dra...179?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20d63d8bcb

Good for stripping off large areas in carving I use one on canoes here from solid tree trunks, then use a foe for the inside an burn out a big area I take some pictures for you tomorrow of the ones I have that I'll let go. what else are you looking for ??????
 

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Take a look at Magard Log Home Building Tools. Maurice makes draw knives 4 dozen at a time. Been in the biz for 25-30 years. Don't forget to study the lit up log home on his home page.
The guy lives like a bat = never call before 3PM.
 

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I think a straight and a curved knife in user condition would suit me just fine if you're interested in parting with them!

Just trying to do some homework first.

I was looking at this ad, see the side profile on the top knife? It almost has an 'U' to it. Wondering if that was for a specific purpose.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Dra...179?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20d63d8bcb

I would bet the indentation behind the cutting edge was intended to reduce friction as the blade moves through the wood. I've seen modern tools built that way, and that's always the claim. The few reviews I've seen on modern tools say that it doesn't really make much difference, though.

I can't give much advice on drawknives specifically, though, since I've only used one a couple times for extremely rough work.
 

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I use both spoke shaves and draw knives. They are as different as night is from day (up here in the winter, that's debatable.). I agree with Cabinetman = a drawknife is a wicked, aggressive tool and it takes a while to get the movements of skinning the bark off a log chunk.

Even if you have no appetite to buy anything from Magard, you can see what a variety of draw knives looks like.
 

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In History is the Future
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I did a little thread on cleaning up a draw knife some time ago -

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/refurbish-old-draw-knife-44777/

Doesn't even begin to answer all of your questions but it may be worth looking at for encouragement on cleaning up the ones that you find.

Draw knife are very versatile - bark removal was more commonly done with a bark spud rather than a draw knife. Draw knives are probably more wide spread across wood disciplines than chisels as far as use.
 

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Firemedic: you don't suppose that a spud might be the best tool for hardwoods and a drawknife for conifers? Up here, conifer logs 12" - 18" are the most readily available for constructing log homes.
I see enough logs homes go up to watch that everyone straddles the logs and pulls with draw knives.
Need 200 logs? Sure. We can deliver that tomorrow.
 

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Draw knife are very versatile - bark removal was more commonly done with a bark spud rather than a draw knife.
It may depend on how old or dry the log is, or your preference in tools. Some bark is just ready to fall off. You may get more leverage with a spud, but I would rather use a tool with two handles.:yes:






.
 

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I did a little thread on cleaning up a draw knife some time ago -

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/refurbish-old-draw-knife-44777/

Doesn't even begin to answer all of your questions but it may be worth looking at for encouragement on cleaning up the ones that you find.

Draw knife are very versatile - bark removal was more commonly done with a bark spud rather than a draw knife. Draw knives are probably more wide spread across wood disciplines than chisels as far as use.
+ 1 here I use them off an on, on the bigger carvings I find the indention works great for me throw dry wood an I am specking from experience, these are the ones that get used a lot I have from 2 inch all the way to 12 inch I collect them to but I do have extra, when it comes to canoe making from the log the draw knives make light work all the way to front of shaping the canoe

these are old ones but work great an need to get honed again, but the next big carving I will be doing is of 2 dolphins an a Mermaid an its going to North Carolina for auction for the wounded warrior project
 

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In History is the Future
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Firemedic: you don't suppose that a spud might be the best tool for hardwoods and a drawknife for conifers? Up here, conifer logs 12" - 18" are the most readily available for constructing log homes.
I see enough logs homes go up to watch that everyone straddles the logs and pulls with draw knives.
Need 200 logs? Sure. We can deliver that tomorrow.
I think a traditional pig sticker is the best tool for a mortice but how many still use that?

Draw knives are readily available - when was the last time you saw a new bark spud for sale?

It may depend on how old or dry the log is, or your preference in tools. Some bark is just ready to fall off. You may get more leverage with a spud, but I would rather use a tool with two handles.:yes:
It's more a matter of season it was felled. If you let a log "dry out" with the bark on you are more likely to have a bug eaten rotten log than a log with lose bark.
 
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