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No Longer Here, BY CHOICE
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Im ready to clean up my saw top on one of the saws Im restoring. I had originally decided to use electrolosis but I cant find a tub large enough to do the entire top. I suppose I could build a pan and line it with plastic but that just seems like a headache when it springs a leak. I also need to do this outside for obvious reasons and Ive read this process dosnt work the best in cold conditions. Thoughts?

I started reading about Evapo Rust and that seems like a great solution but at $22 a gallon, Id need several gallons to submerge a saw top.

I really dont want to sand or grind on my top if there are other ways. Help me out folks!
 
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Sawdust Creator
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Phosphoric acid works well.... But in the inexpensive mode your still going to need a large tub. You can get it in gel form but it's going to get more expensive.
 

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A number of threads on rust removal, perhaps most in the Hand Tools forum.

I would use Oxalic Acid, likely on the container as "Wood bleach". Do not let the name fool you.

One thread example.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/first-time-using-oxalic-acid-rust-removal-48107/

Inexpensive, but you will need to submerge the parts. If you do not have a large enough tub, then get some large garden debris garbage bags. Look for the thicker ones so you have a hope of not piecing the bag.

A few tablespoons of oxalic acid per gallon of water. The reaction is slower than Evapo-Rust. Heat helps, so if you can do this in a warm basement rather than a cold garage, it will work better.

Allow the parts to be submerged for about 24 hours.
 

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topsaver and a course scotchbrite pad followed by paste wax. old school and reliable.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay, Im back to square one. Ive decided to go forward with electrolysis. Ive searched the world for a suitable tub but cant find anything suitable that dosnt cost a fortune. Im gonna pick up a 2X8 and frame a box with a plywood bottom and line the thing with a couple layers of visqueen.

Im having trouble finding washing soda but have heard that baking soda will work?

Also Ive read that this is a slower process when its cold. Ill fill the tub with hot water but I expect it will cool fairly quickly. Its about 45 out today, forcast is calling for 28 tonight and 33 tomorrow. I dont think it will freeze up inside my garage but how long can I expect a saw top to take under these conditions?
 

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If the rust is minor I think it's a lot easier to just sand it off. I just use a random orbital sander with 220 paper.
Its not extreme but its not minor either. I prefer not to use abrasives if I dont have too.
 

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Okay, Im back to square one. Ive decided to go forward with electrolysis. Ive searched the world for a suitable tub but cant find anything suitable that dosnt cost a fortune. Im gonna pick up a 2X8 and frame a box with a plywood bottom and line the thing with a couple layers of visqueen.

Im having trouble finding washing soda but have heard that baking soda will work?

Also Ive read that this is a slower process when its cold. Ill fill the tub with hot water but I expect it will cool fairly quickly. Its about 45 out today, forcast is calling for 28 tonight and 33 tomorrow. I dont think it will freeze up inside my garage but how long can I expect a saw top to take under these conditions?

You don't even need a plywood bottom if you have a flat concrete/asphalt place to put the frame.

We used to use frames like that in a greenhouse to hold floating trays for seedling tobacco plants. Build the frame, lay the plastic over it with plenty of overlap and fill it. Just make sure you don't have anything on the frame or floor that will puncture the plastic.

I used to use baking soda with no problems. Don't know if/how much slower than washing soda, never did a side by side comparison.

I've done electrolysis when it's been freezing outside, as long as your water bath doesn't freeze it will still work.

I'm not sure on time, that depends on temp, amperage of power supply, size of top and how much/placement of sacrificial steel. I'd plan on overnight at least.

BTW - if you have a Menards near you, they carry washing soda - should be in the same area as laundry detergent.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You don't even need a plywood bottom if you have a flat concrete/asphalt place to put the frame.

We used to use frames like that in a greenhouse to hold floating trays for seedling tobacco plants. Build the frame, lay the plastic over it with plenty of overlap and fill it. Just make sure you don't have anything on the frame or floor that will puncture the plastic.

I used to use baking soda with no problems. Don't know if/how much slower than washing soda, never did a side by side comparison.

I've done electrolysis when it's been freezing outside, as long as your water bath doesn't freeze it will still work.

I'm not sure on time, that depends on temp, amperage of power supply, size of top and how much/placement of sacrificial steel. I'd plan on overnight at least.

BTW - if you have a Menards near you, they carry washing soda - should be in the same area as laundry detergent.
I thought about just doing a frame but was concerned that the water may try and push under the frame and lift it up. I have a bunch of scrap plywood anyhow so Ill zip a piece on there just to be sure.

I purchased 10' of 1/2" rebar. Im going to weld a couple of small frames out of it that will sit in there to try and get a decent amount of coverage.

I got all my supplies gathered. Ill get this thing put together and going in the morning. I dont go back to work untill Mon night so it can set till Mon morning if needed.

We do have a Menards but its on the other side of the city. I only looked at WalMart because they were next to Home Depot. Ill run to the grocery store tomorrow and see what I can find. If they dont have it, Im going with baking soda.

Ill post before and after pics. Hopefully this works!
 

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WarnerConstInc. said:
Ace has washing soda and dollar general had it the last time I was there. Baking soda is not a good substitute.
Why isn't it? I disagree Warner. I used baking soda on my drill press restoration and had great results. Either will work.
 

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Ace has washing soda and dollar general had it the last time I was there. Baking soda is not a good substitute.
The last Ace in town closed its doors last year. We have a Dollar General down the street though. Ill check there.
 

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David
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Electrolysis for removal

I used electrolysis on my saw top and two jointers with great success but I didn't submerge. I used my 12v battery charger and hooked one lead to the machine and one to a thin piece of metal I bought at Lowe's. Seems like the metal is about 16 gauge, not certain. I soaked a towel in water/baking soda mix, lightly wrung it out, and set it on the rusted piece (the blocks of Mahogany were just for weight to make certain the metal was in full contact with the towel). Then I turned the charger on and watched the current. When it dropped to almost no current draw that told me the solution had been depleted in the towel and I turned the charger off. Once that step was complete I used ScotchBrite or wet/dry 400 paper to remove the residue. The process takes about 4 minutes once you apply current, maybe 5 at most. Take a look at the photos for what may be a better representation that my description -

I'll post another message showing how I did the cutterhead.
 

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David
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Same procedure on cutterhead

Wrapped the cutterhead in the wet rag, wrapped it in bailing wire, then applied current. A few minutes later I pulled the rag off, lightly knocked the rust off with ScotchBrite and 320/400 paper, put it back in the jointer and called it good.
 

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Build your frame set in on concrete, lay a heavy mil drop cloth,{plastic sheeting} over the frame. On one side lay your re bar rod down lay your table top away from the re-bar. fill with a premix solution of 5tbs of baking soda a 5 gallons of water. May have to mix more to completely cover the table top.
http://www.rickswoodshopcreations.com/miscellaneous/rust_removal.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The wet rag trick looks like it done a pretty good job!

I struck out at Dollar General but stopped at the Do It Best hardware next door to see if they had brushes for my angle grinder. They didnt but they did have washing soda!

I got my frame built this morning. The visqueen was making me a little nervous so I decided to line the box with an old tarp I had and then put the visqueen over that. I wired in some rebar on every side of the box. It dosnt seem to be leaking so I think its gonna work out pretty good. I started the process at 4pm. I figure Ill let it run overnight and check the progress in the morning. Its already starting to build a scum layer on top of the water only a half hour in.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Heres a before pic of the top.



ForumRunner_20140202_163155.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #20
One hour in.



ForumRunner_20140202_171150.jpg
 
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