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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The fiance talked me into getting some bottle stopper blanks from woodcraft that she liked and everything was going fine until the sanding. For some reason, I have my theories but would like to hear from the experts, the different colored wood is spreading the darker colors into the lighter ones. Its mainly the reddish color that is giving me problems but I also noticed some darkness from the walnut to.

I would appreciate all help and suggestion to fix this and prevent it from happening again. Thanks

Product Wood Wood stain Metal
 

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This is a common problem. In my flat work, I am able to use a Random Orbit Sander with my shop vac hooked up. This is important since it removes the dust before it can impact surrounding different coloured wood.

If I recall one method is to coat the piece with something to seal the pores. I am not recalling the specific product, perhaps beeswax and shellac. Sealing the pores prevents the red from being ground into the other woods.

If I can recall more details I will update this reply, unless others are able to provide other solutions.
 

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Try just sealing with some sanding sealer (shellac) or spray lacquer. Also move your paper often and don't let the sawdust accumulate on it. Blow off the dust (from your blank) with your compressor. Sand as little as possible and try not to grind the dust into the blank. This will help, but paduak and bloodwood are the worst, especially when situated right next to maple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So I should probably sharpen my tools really good and take a pass over it all to get rid of the mess now and start again with as little of sanding as possible?
 

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I once made a piece out of Padauk and Maple. Talk about a nightmare to sand. The carry over was rediculous. I put out a feeler just like you did and got some excellent responses. What worked for me is more or less what everyone has said.
first off is get as clean a cut as you can. Speed up the lathe and don't force the cut with the sharpest tool you have.
apply sanding sealer between every grit. It will tend to clog the sandpaper so you might consider buying some Abranet sandpaper from Woodcraft. It doesn't clog.
Brush it or blow it off between every grit. Sand lightly, don't push on it, let the paper do the work.
If you do all of the above you will have good results with all but the worst cases. I mean I was able to do the Padauk and Maple which is about the worse case I can think of. Torn grain in the maple really makes the problem bad so make sure your light woods are cut as clean as you can.
 
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