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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, have a problem here. Wanted to refinish my hardwood floors and got a machine and started with some 36 and 40 grit sandpaper....As soon as I started some kind of glue like stains started forming on the floor....I checked the sandapeper and it was glued to it too....It looks like it comes from dust heating up and melting....Not sure what to do....Any help APPRECIATED...

Attached are some pictures...
 

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Hello everyone, have a problem here. Wanted to refinish my hardwood floors and got a machine and started with some 36 and 40 grit sandpaper....As soon as I started some kind of glue like stains started forming on the floor....I checked the sandapeper and it was glued to it too....It looks like it comes from dust heating up and melting....Not sure what to do....Any help APPRECIATED...

Attached are some pictures...
That looks like the finish dust from the sander melted due to the sanding heat. You may need to scrape off the wood or try a solvent.

Ideally the sander would have some kind of dust extraction. I am not seeing any holes in the pad so it looks like no dust extraction.

You will need to sand slowly and without too much force in order to minimize the heat build up. Also frequently check the pad to make sure more of the finish dust is not melting.
 

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does the floor sander have a variable speed control? if yes, it might be running to fast or too slow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I connected the sander to a shop vac but it didn't seem like it was vacuuming any dust....Also there is no variable speed. Just on and off....I got the sander at Home Depot....I was thinking of switching to belt one... Suggestions?
 

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I connected the sander to a shop vac but it didn't seem like it was vacuuming any dust....Also there is no variable speed. Just on and off....I got the sander at Home Depot....I was thinking of switching to belt one... Suggestions?
If the sander has shop vac connection this is good, but you need discs with holes in, or as you are observing, the shop vac is not able to suck up the dust.

In the picture of the disc I am not seeing any holes.

Either get discs with holes, or punch in holes to match the pattern in the sander - assuming the sander pad does have holes.

A belt sander is not going to be much better. Also tends to heat up the wood.
 

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Is this a made for floor sander you are using or a woodworking sander that you are using for floor sanding? That pad in your hand is sure small for a floor sander.

The floor could have a finish that is causing the burned look.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It is a floor sander. But I might give it a shot with the drum sander. Few people told me that drum sanders shave off a lot of wood, and since I've never done this before I was a bit reluctant to try it. With the belt sander what kind of grit should I start considering I am a beginner?
 

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It is a floor sander. But I might give it a shot with the drum sander. Few people told me that drum sanders shave off a lot of wood, and since I've never done this before I was a bit reluctant to try it. With the belt sander what kind of grit should I start considering I am a beginner?
The grit is likely not dependant on the machine.

You started with 36 or 40 before. You can do the same with the belt sander. Prepare to get the same result - gummed up belt in a short time. You need to remove the dust or it will melt on the abrasive.
 

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Years ago, I had floors refinished and the finish they were sanding off was shellac. Even the belt sander gummed up. They went through a LOT of belts.

Prior to that, I had helped a friend do his floors and that's why I hired pros to do my own floors. The belt sander is very aggressive and based on my experience takes some practice to master.
 

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Floor sanding

There are times when a woodworker needs to back off and let another woodworker take over, sanding floors is one of those times. Hire a professional floor sanding company, you will not believe the tools he shows up with or the speed in which he gets the job done, or how little dust gets in the air. It's been over forty years since I tried to sand a floor down and I don't once regret letting the pros do it. Like most woodworkers I am stubborn to a fault when it comes to doing anything with wood, but these floor sanding guys are fantastic!


Best of Luck,
Bandman
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate your guys input. I talked to few people that actually do floors for living and they suggested that I use belt sander. Since orbital sander move the sand and don't make it heat up. I would rather hire someone, but I can't swallow paying someone $500 cash a day for 4 day job....
 

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4 days? You need to find someone else.....I've seen guys sand the whole house in a single day.
 

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Don't give up, I sanded two bedroom floors in my first house with a small belt sander. it builds character and strengthens the back... try moving over a larger area and don't move too slow.
 

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Try again and try to learn at what speed to sand. The disk you are showing is not too small but rather the newer type of sanders that are replacing the older drum sanders. The multi disk sanders don't chew up the floor and leave a much smoother or flat floor. I used one about 4 years ago and took a long time to sand flat the floors after they had waves in them from previous drum sander.

First thing you want to do is go back to HD and get some 24 grit disk (I think that's the lowest one they got). I had the same problem you got and the lower grit solved my problem.
 

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The link I sent you says drum sander, but this drum sander is made specifically for floors.
It has a vacuum system and is the appropriate machine to do your job in one day.
You will go through a few belts of various grits.
Then you take it back and finish up the edges and corners it will not sand with a belt sander and the orbital in the picture.
 

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The link I sent you says drum sander, but this drum sander is made specifically for floors.
It has a vacuum system and is the appropriate machine to do your job in one day.
You will go through a few belts of various grits.
Then you take it back and finish up the edges and corners it will not sand with a belt sander and the orbital in the picture.
This is the unit you should use...Begin with 24 grit till the finish is gone off the floor. You typically go through several of the heavy grit papers do to glazing of the finish. Once the finish is off, you work your way through the grits till you achieve the desired smoothness. After you get the finish off, glazing will stop and the paper will wear like iron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The link I sent you says drum sander, but this drum sander is made specifically for floors.
It has a vacuum system and is the appropriate machine to do your job in one day.
You will go through a few belts of various grits.
Then you take it back and finish up the edges and corners it will not sand with a belt sander and the orbital in the picture.

I was affraid that this unit takes (shaves) too much of the floor. And I didn't want to ruin the floor since this is the first time I am doing it. Is this the same as belt sander?
 

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bzguy
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I was affraid that this unit takes (shaves) too much of the floor. And I didn't want to ruin the floor since this is the first time I am doing it. Is this the same as belt sander?
Essentially yes, hand held belt sanders have 2 drums also.
You just need to go slow and not tip the machine forwards or backwards, or lean it sideways either.
This will dig drum shaped holes.
Let the machine do the work.
 

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Make sure the machine is moving when dropping the drum to the floor and you will be fine. Within a few minutes you'll get the hang of it and you'll be fine.
 
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