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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On MLK day, I was finishing the sanding on parts to the pantry I'm building. Since it was cold outside, I had the doors shut. I was using one of my older, all metal, craftsman belt sanders. As we all know, all metal tools get warm and hot. It kept getting hotter and I just thought that it was because of my constant usage for about 10 minutes. At that point I saw a spark, the sander stopped working, and flames shot out of each side of the tool. Needless to say, I dropped the sander, made my way through the smoke to the overhead door and opened it. I then took the sander outside and proceeded to get rid of the smoke with my blower. Fortunately, like all of my all metal tools, I always make sure they're rewired with a ground.:eek:
 

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where's my table saw?
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probably was choked up with dust...

It's a good idea to blow the dust out of all your sanders every so often. I think I have that same "polished aluminum" Craftsman sander a 4" x 24" if I recall. It's a workhorse, but there is NO dust collection.

Does it still work? :huh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I always make sure that I blow out the dust after every project. I knew it needed new brushes because it would spark now and then. I liked it because it was light weight. Now I'll have to use my 4"x24" heavy sander until I can get another one.
 

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I've never had that happen even after hours of sanding. Since yours was recently blown out with air, more than likely a short. I can't remember worn brushes sparking. I have seen some sparking with new ones until they get bedded in a bit. Could be some particles got into some rotating parts, and they ignited.




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On MLK day, I was finishing the sanding on parts to the pantry I'm building. Since it was cold outside, I had the doors shut. I was using one of my older, all metal, craftsman belt sanders. As we all know, all metal tools get warm and hot. It kept getting hotter and I just thought that it was because of my constant usage for about 10 minutes. At that point I saw a spark, the sander stopped working, and flames shot out of each side of the tool. Needless to say, I dropped the sander, made my way through the smoke to the overhead door and opened it. I then took the sander outside and proceeded to get rid of the smoke with my blower. Fortunately, like all of my all metal tools, I always make sure they're rewired with a ground.:eek:
All metal tools do not get "warm and hot."

I have probably the exact same sander that you have. It has never gotten even warm that I know of. If it gets hot it is trying to tell you something. Ten minutes of use is not a long time.

George
 
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