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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have about 200 eight-foot 2x4s and 2x6s from demolition. Except for some adhesive residue (liquid nails, I think) and pieces of cement board backing, they are in good shape and I’d like to re-use them. However, I need to clean them up first and am looking for recommendations. Putting them through the planer seems like a bad idea ( what with liquid nails/cement board remnants). Maybe I just use a belt sander? I don’t have a drum sander, but I guess that’s another alternative. Ripping them on the table saw seems problematic due to the uneven edges from the adhesive remnants. Any other ideas out there? Thanks!
 

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welcome to the forum Hatch.
sorry, but your question is more or less fruitless because we can't see your lumber or feel it.
and - we don't know how you want to re-use the lumber.
are you wanting to make rabbit pens or fine furniture ?
you can start cleaning them with whatever you find that works. there is no one answer that will cover all the issues.
a draw knife comes to my mind to start with.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the reply. All of the lumber is kiln-dried pine construction grade. So I’ll likely use it for things like a workbench or or laminated countertops or some shop furniture, etc. it’s not fine hardwood or anything.

Attached below is a picture. You can see some
Cement board that is still glued to the wood.

Draw knives are a good idea, thanks! Come to think of it, I’ve got a nice Stanley 82 scraper on a back drawer somewhere that would be good for this. I should have remembered that earlier.

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I have about 200 eight-foot 2x4s and 2x6s from demolition. Except for some adhesive residue (liquid nails, I think) and pieces of cement board backing, they are in good shape and I’d like to re-use them. However, I need to clean them up first and am looking for recommendations. Putting them through the planer seems like a bad idea ( what with liquid nails/cement board remnants). Maybe I just use a belt sander? I don’t have a drum sander, but I guess that’s another alternative. Ripping them on the table saw seems problematic due to the uneven edges from the adhesive remnants. Any other ideas out there? Thanks!
How much are planer blade to sharpen or replace. 200 2x4's=? Versus the cost of sharpening or replacement of blades..

I used my planer to make new spindles from old treated decking. $20-$30 to ReSharper blades after done...
 

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mike44
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Saw the crap off. Make a sled that rides along the fence . Add a fence to the sled 3-1/4" from the edge. This will register the board AFTER you clean up the first edge. On the opposite side of the sled fasten the board to the sled over hanging by 1/16". Toggle clamps or just a screw thru the board will do to hold the board for ripping.
Your lumber is probably 3-1/2" wide. When you rip the 1/16" off, fasten to the sled fence to rip the second edge off. The 2x will probably be 3-5/16" wide if the blade is 1/8" thick and the off cut is 1/16".
Use a rip blade of 20 teeth or so. Try to remove any nails. the glue and bits of cement board will come off with the 1/16" rip. This works for the 2x edges. I see that one board has the glue on a face, I imagine these were part of outside corners and there will be only a few like that. If so, store them for last and remove the glue the best way you can. Maybe a heat gun might soften the glue and it may be scrape off leaving a thin residue. Keep in mind that subfloor adhesive is highly flammable. Panel adhesive is about the same thing.
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Hopefully, you don’t have a SawStop, or helical head jointer or planer.

Buy a good metal detector.

IMO I know people do it, but I f it’s spruce it’s not going to make a very durable benchtop. If it’s SYP thats better.

A No. 82 is not the tool for removing concrete! Use a paint scraper or belt sander.
 

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A hand scraper of some sort will work the best but also take the most time. If they ate going to be used again as framing lumber they don't have to be perfectly clean.
 

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I believe that the quickest/easiest way to clean up your lumber is with an angle grinder using a very coarse disk; like a rotary rasp. There is a wide variety of disks available for the angle grinder and some may work better than others. You will likely be left with some uneveness but once the junk is removed you can easily true them up with other equipment. As mentioned, be aware of nails and other embedded metal.
 

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Hopefully, you don’t have a SawStop, or helical head jointer or planer.

Buy a good metal detector.

IMO I know people do it, but I f it’s spruce it’s not going to make a very durable benchtop. If it’s SYP thats better.

A No. 82 is not the tool for removing concrete! Use a paint scraper or belt sander.
Agree w/Robert: get a detector so you can get that nails out. Then your options increase dramatically. The wood you've got won't, I think, make a good bench top but should make a good substrate supporting 1//2" or 3/4" marine ply.
 

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I like @yomanbill 's idea of the angle grinder.
When on sale these can be purchased for around $12 or so at Harbor Freight. get a small pack of 25 Grit disks for it and go at it. They work very fast and the disks are cheap.
I use my angle grinder quite bit. It can eat through a 4x4 in no time at all.
DEFINITELY WEAR SAFETY GLASSES or other form of good eye protection. Grit and trash will be flying around at high speed.
 

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Assuming you want not only clean surfaces, I think an angle grinder is a terrible idea. It's a brutal tool and you won't have good visibility when using it. You wood is construction-grade kiln-dried fir, and the AG will eat it up, leaving will a scarred damaged surface. Choose something that works a bit slowly and let's you see what's happening, gives you total control. The drawknife idea appeal to me, and various scrapers. Are you thinking of doing all 200 at one go--or as needed?
 

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Attached below is a picture. You can see some
Cement board that is still glued to the wood.

That doesn't look like cement board glued to the 2X stock. I've salvaged truck loads of construction lumber over a few decades. That looks like stock used for forming up a concrete pour and the spill-over cement adhered to the boards.

Sawing it off is not a good idea. You don't want that kind of (rock) dust inside your saw, in your dust collector or in your shop, not to mention dulling your saw blade. It's not worth the effort.

Using a draw knife is not a good idea, at all, for a number of obvious reasons.

You'll discover you'll use several different methods, depending on the different adherence of the concrete to the board. The adherence will vary along the length of the board..... it's not always exactly the same. First off, beat the board with a heavy mallet... the vibration will flake off some of the concrete. A dedicated scraper is tedious, but effective. At times, I've used a 14" wanda bar, the short end, for scraping concrete from boards.... Sharpen the short end edge and resharpen as needed.
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For the concrete that doesn't flake/scrape off easily, your best bet is to use a disc grinder/sander, outdoors. Wear goggles and a dust mask. You won't have any trouble seeing what you are grinding. You won't be gouging or disfiguring your boards as much as you may think. You'll learn how to control your grinding/sanding, such that, essentially only the concrete is buffed off, with only little scarring of the board. A grinder/sander is not hard to control, that way. A grinder with a flexible rubber disc backing is best, not a hard metal grinding type disc. You likely won't need all the boards perfectly clean. At least half of your boards will end up with "good enough" clean surfaces, suitable for a good surfaced project.... or you'll have enough sufficiently cleaned boards that will only need a little more cleaning for "very good enough" use.

It's salvaged boards. Don't sweat obtaining perfection. A project with that quality of lumber is not likely to be fine furniture or the like. A few imperfections will fit right in with the character of the project piece.

Sonny
 

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mike44
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Cement board that is still glued to the wood.

That doesn't look like cement board glued to the 2X stock. I've salvaged truck loads of construction lumber over a few decades. That looks like stock used for forming up a concrete pour and the spill-over cement adhered to the boards.

Sawing it off is not a good idea. You don't want that kind of (rock) dust inside your saw, in your dust collector or in your shop, not to mention dulling your saw blade. It's not worth the effort.

Using a draw knife is not a good idea, at all, for a number of obvious reasons.

You'll discover you'll use several different methods, depending on the different adherence of the concrete to the board. The adherence will vary along the length of the board..... it's not always exactly the same. First off, beat the board with a heavy mallet... the vibration will flake off some of the concrete. A dedicated scraper is tedious, but effective. At times, I've used a 14" wanda bar, the short end, for scraping concrete from boards.... Sharpen the short end edge and resharpen as needed.
View attachment 432943

For the concrete that doesn't flake/scrape off easily, your best bet is to use a disc grinder/sander, outdoors. Wear goggles and a dust mask. You won't have any trouble seeing what you are grinding. You won't be gouging or disfiguring your boards as much as you may think. You'll learn how to control your grinding/sanding, such that, essentially only the concrete is buffed off, with only little scarring of the board. A grinder/sander is not hard to control, that way. A grinder with a flexible rubber disc backing is best, not a hard metal grinding type disc. You likely won't need all the boards perfectly clean. At least half of your boards will end up with "good enough" clean surfaces, suitable for a good surfaced project.... or you'll have enough sufficiently cleaned boards that will only need a little more cleaning for "very good enough" use.

It's salvaged boards. Don't sweat obtaining perfection. A project with that quality of lumber is not likely to be fine furniture or the like. A few imperfections will fit right in with the character of the project piece.

Sonny
Sonny, I am quite sure the residue is subfloor or panel adhesive. Concrete spatter will come off with a few taps with a hammer. Also the texture is wrong for concrete and looks exactly like adhesive to my eye. If the OP taps the concrete/adhesive ? then he can tell immediately what it is. If it flakes off it is concrete, adhesive will not flake off. Also if there is cement board patches it is adhesive , not concrete. Sawing off 1/16" will remove the crap and not touch the blade. I once had to remove and replace exterior stairs and handrails that went from the ground to the third floor.
The rails were cedar that had many coats of paint. I took the rails home and sawed off the paint with a 1/16" cut on all 4 sides. Have quite a few board feet of cedar 2x's.
Also, if some of the boards will be used for a work bench ,then removing 1/16" or more will eliminate the broken edge ( rounded edge on construction lumber) . That is what you want especially if you laminate the lumber.
mike
 

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Mike, I'm gonna have to concede to your reply. I enlarged Hatch's pic and viewed it better. Furthermore, I'm not totally familiar with cement board applications on walls, as I suppose that's where the cement board was applied and the 2X stock came from. I was familiar with installing cement board on floors with ply underlay, however, not being any sort of home construction or home handyman worker, it took me a while to realize that it's installed on walls, as well. Maybe I should stick to my hobby crafting/woodworking, but I did learn or realize better something of these types of considerations.

In viewing the pic, I think I can not only see the "tracks" of where the beads of adhesive was applied, but there seems to still be some exposed adhesive on the boards. With that being the case, I'm not so sure my suggestions for removing the debris is as affective as I initially thought.

Thanks. Sonny
 

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mike44
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Mike, I'm gonna have to concede to your reply. I enlarged Hatch's pic and viewed it better. Furthermore, I'm not totally familiar with cement board applications on walls, as I suppose that's where the cement board was applied and the 2X stock came from. I was familiar with installing cement board on floors with ply underlay, however, not being any sort of home construction or home handyman worker, it took me a while to realize that it's installed on walls, as well. Maybe I should stick to my hobby crafting/woodworking, but I did learn or realize better something of these types of considerations.

In viewing the pic, I think I can not only see the "tracks" of where the beads of adhesive was applied, but there seems to still be some exposed adhesive on the boards. With that being the case, I'm not so sure my suggestions for removing the debris is as affective as I initially thought.

Thanks. Sonny
Sonny, I am a retired carpenter that has done everything from concrete formwork to trim work for many years. I would not expect other people to recognize what I saw in the OP's pics. Your posts are welcomed and usually spot on.
Keep posting, I have posted things that I later found was a mistake . I am sure I will do it again, not on purpose of course.
mike
 
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