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I was nearsighted as a youngster and just past forty I went into the "can't read the fine print on the menu" mode. I ended up with progressive lenses which worked out great for me.

As I understand it, a nearsighted person can't just get magnifying reading glasses, but they actually diminish the near sighted progression for the up close work. I've tried my wife's readers and they just don't work.

Anybody know of anything in the way of safety glasses that will give me a great deal of magnification for close work such as inlays?
 

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Home Depot has magnifying safety glasses and bifocals but these may not be any better then the "readers". You may think about a magnifying lamp. These are available in different styles magnetic base, floor stand models, desk top models, some with clips for a base,etc. These are available from a number of places, I suggest starting with Amazon.com to see what is available and go from there.
 

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Look at the fluorescent ring lights with the big magnifier in the middle. Place to start would be Stew-Mac ( luthier's supply).
The other places to look are guitar & banjo maker's sites. Big guns like Martin, Fender, National, Gibson and so on.
Sometimes, there are stills in a slide show/factory tour. Possibly you see what they use for the fantastically intricate inlay.
 

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Glasses can be prescribed for almost any need.

I have two sets of bifocals. (I won't wear progressives because of off center distortion.) Both sets match my need to correct astigmatism. One set is for normal life while the other set is for computer use.

The trick is communicating your needs to the optometrist. The prescription is written the bifocal lens is an add of magnification to the main lens. (It can be an add of a negative magnification.)

At testing, you need to determine what is the distance that you need clarity for the top lens. e.g. Mine is maximum 30" and inward. Then, and this is the really important part, you need to communicate the range of clarity for the bifocal part. The "add" for the second set of glasses will be vastly different than your normal bifocals.

I would also suggest polycarbonate lenses. Pick the largest lenses possible for shop work. They offer more eye protection.
 

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Bifocal safety Glasses

I was nearsighted as a youngster and just past forty I went into the "can't read the fine print on the menu" mode. I ended up with progressive lenses which worked out great for me.

As I understand it, a nearsighted person can't just get magnifying reading glasses, but they actually diminish the near sighted progression for the up close work. I've tried my wife's readers and they just don't work.

Anybody know of anything in the way of safety glasses that will give me a great deal of magnification for close work such as inlays?
You might like to try bifocal safety glasses. The non-prescription ones come in various magnifications up to +3.00 and are fairly inexpensive. Alternatively you could always measure the distance that you are working at for your inlays visit you eye doctor and get them to make up safety glasses for that specific distance. I hope this helps.
 

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got some magnifing safety glasses at Grainger for a few bucks. :thumbsup:
 

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You can have your eye doctor write a script for safety glasses with side shields. They would probably be the best choice, it's up to you, you see.

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I forgot to mention wearing a face shield or some clear goggles over your glasses

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