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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a router bit break for the first time. It was a 1/4 straight and broke the first time I've used it. Definitely going to start replacing these ryobi bits a lot sooner now. Anyone have opinions on what I should replace it with. I'm thinking Freud but also whiteside. What's y'all's opinion
 

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Well I'm assuming you're safe, that could have done some damage. I believe I have the same bit and its still I'm healthy condition. Must have been a dud from the start.
 

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Only time that happened to me was when I was routing too deep. I think I was on the second pass to a final depth of 1/2". So, it was cutting somewhere around a 1/4" in red oak. Probably shoulda done it in 3 passes.:eek:
It was a Freud bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
lilman said:
Well I'm assuming you're safe, that could have done some damage. I believe I have the same bit and its still I'm healthy condition. Must have been a dud from the start.
I use my 3/4 straight the most and I've never had a problem with it. I have that set ryobi used to make with 25 or 30 bits in a little wooden case with the glass doors. Bought it for 50 bucks when I got my first router. I did pick up a new 1/4 straight bit at woodcraft. I was going to get a whiteside but they didn't have any with a 1/2 shank so ended up buying the wood river brand cause the sales guy said he has a bunch of those and has never had to get rid of one yet. It cost about 6 bucks less than what a whiteside would have cost and I could see a huge difference in the blade when I used it. The ryobi blade always felt like it was working and this one cut fast and like warm butter. Very happy with it. I'll probably change out my straight bits with the wood river 1/2 shanks and for everything else buy whiteside.
 

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I've broke a couple of grizzly bits in the same size also. What I learned is to take lots of light passes and the harder the wood the lighter the pass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Paarker said:
I've broke a couple of grizzly bits in the same size also. What I learned is to take lots of light passes and the harder the wood the lighter the pass.
That's typically what I do. I had router a few pieces of red oak at 1/4" deep then was routing some poplar at the same depth when it broke
 

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John
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Had a router bit break for the first time. It was a 1/4 straight and broke the first time I've used it. Definitely going to start replacing these ryobi bits a lot sooner now. Anyone have opinions on what I should replace it with. I'm thinking Freud but also whiteside. What's y'all's opinion
Just how deep a cut were you making? I've broken several and when reflecting on it, almost invariably came to the conclusion the problem was either to deep of a cut, to fast of a feed rate, a dull bit or a combination of all three.
A good, conservative rule of thumb is the max depth of cut of any pass should be no more than 1/2 the diameter of the bit shank. The harder the material you would want to either adjust for less depth or a slower feed rate.
Whiteside or Freud would be good choices because the 1/4" bit is a fairly high usage item but I also have several Wood River bit and have never had any issues. I consider the MLCS slightly better quality though.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
jschaben said:
Just how deep a cut were you making? I've broken several and when reflecting on it, almost invariably came to the conclusion the problem was either to deep of a cut, to fast of a feed rate, a dull bit or a combination of all three. A good, conservative rule of thumb is the max depth of cut of any pass should be no more than 1/2 the diameter of the bit shank. The harder the material you would want to either adjust for less depth or a slower feed rate. Whiteside or Freud would be good choices because the 1/4" bit is a fairly high usage item but I also have several Wood River bit and have never had any issues. I consider the MLCS slightly better quality though.:smile:
I was routing a little less than 1/4 in depth. Was making some picture frames and just cutting the notch that the glass sits into
 

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John
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I was routing a little less than 1/4 in depth. Was making some picture frames and just cutting the notch that the glass sits into
That does sound like a defective bit. Depth of cut doesn't sound excessive and, while Ryobi isn't exactly a high end bit it should have been sharp enough for that. A tip though - for doing the picture frame rabbets I usually go for at least a 3/4" diameter bit and set the width of the rabbet with the fence. That has worked the best for me in terms of cut quality. Bit doesn't have to work as hard either.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
jschaben said:
That does sound like a defective bit. Depth of cut doesn't sound excessive and, while Ryobi isn't exactly a high end bit it should have been sharp enough for that. A tip though - for doing the picture frame rabbets I usually go for at least a 3/4" diameter bit and set the width of the rabbet with the fence. That has worked the best for me in terms of cut quality. Bit doesn't have to work as hard either.:smile:
Very good suggestion. I'll start doing that once I upgrade my 3/4 bit. I did get to see the inside of my broken bit and it does look cheap. Looks like most of it is a cheap material and just coated with steel. The wood river bit I bought works much better. Easier to cut and feels like it's made of better quality
 

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I've been replacing the few Ryobi bits I have and then tossing them in the garbage. I've really liked Freud, white sides, and MLCS, never had a problem with any of them. I am also only buying 1/2" shank bits for greater strength and less deflection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Masterjer said:
I've been replacing the few Ryobi bits I have and then tossing them in the garbage. I've really liked Freud, white sides, and MLCS, never had a problem with any of them. I am also only buying 1/2" shank bits for greater strength and less deflection.
Yeah I think the 1/2 shank size just gives me extra peace of mind. After buying the wood river bit I can see the huge difference in cutting the specialty store bits have over big box store brands. I haven't actually used a whiteside or Freud bit but after reading some posts on here it seemed like a ton of guys love the whiteside bits. I've also been window shopping woodpeckers website and have seen all of these whiteside bits I just have to have once I have the extra cash of course. I mainly do small projects with the intention of selling them on my website and whiteside seems to have every bit I need. I do think I'll just upgrade my straight bits to the wood river brand to save a few bucks but my profile bits an specialty bits I plan to exclusively buy whiteside
 

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Good:
MLCS, Woodline, and Grizzly green are about the best of the value bits.

Better:
Price Cutter, CMT, and Katana

Best:
Whiteside, Eagle America (made by Whiteside), Infinity, Amana, and Freud

Definitely go with 1/2" shank whenever feasible.
 

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John
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I fully agree with knotscotts' quality assessment. You will, however encounter a corresponding increase in prices. I usually hold off on the Whiteside, Amana and other high end bits for the high volume uses; round overs, flush trims, straight, etc.. MLCS, and similar are usually more than adequate for the occasional project. I've found some decent bits from a couple of eBay vendors, specifically Super Carbide Tools and Yonico. Granted they are cheaper, Chinese made but surprisingly sharp and durable.

I have a little different approach to shank size, mostly dependent on cutting diameter, bit configuration and projected usage method. For example, the configuration of a smaller keyhole bit is such that a 1/2" shank makes no sense to me as the small cutting diameter is much less than the shank, even the 1/4" shank, so it would be evident that if it is going to break, it won't be at the shank. Also, those are typically used with a guide bushing, most commonly a 5/8" guide bushing, There is very little space for the swarf (wood chips) to escape so they build up in the bushing. This can quickly lead to overheating the bit and be conducive to it breaking.
Most of my bits, 3/8" and smaller are 1/4" shank..... 3/4" and larger are 1/2" shank and from 3/8 to 3/4 are either, depending on usage. I have several duplicate bits in that range that mainly differ in shank size. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the quality chart! Will definitely make sure to pay the extra cash for the bits that require a lot of precision to keep appearances up in my projects.

I did see an online chart that showed a diameter and shank size. It pretty much showed anything under 1" diameter could use a 1/4 shank anything larger should use 1/2 and had a chart to know what speed to turn the bits at. Unfortunately my router only has one speed which is 25,000rpm so in pretty much limited to bits under 1" in diameter. I do plan to move up to a porter cable router with variable speeds and a 1/2 collet eventually. I want to try to keep all of my bits at 1/2 shank so if I get a router with only a 1/2 collet I won't have to buy an adapter or whatever. Just makes things simpler for me and a lot of specialty bits and sets only are available in 1/2 so might as well get 1/2 everything and a 1/2 router. I don't mind the extra cost because I will be using the bits and router daily and if rather pay for quality and not have to replace anything for years than go cheap and have to replace every 6-12 months. When I first got into electrical work my dad who is a lineman always told me pay the extra money for Kline hand tools and dewalt cordless power tools. It was great advice because I never had to replace a tool due to breaking or underperforming while I saw some other guys replacing their stuff constantly because they bought ryobi or some of the cheaper tools. For me it just makes sense to pay the extra 5-10 bucks on a bit and not have to replace it than buy the same bit multiple times throughout my lifetime.

As always you guys give great advice and great information! One of my best and most reliable tools I have for woodworking is this app and being able to get all of your advice ;-)
 
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