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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This coming summer, I will make many shaker-style kitchen cabinets doors using maple wood (I am going to reface my kitchen). Will Ryobi 10" table saw (15 AMP) do the job?

The kitchen cabinet doors - the smallest is approx 17" x 10" and the largest is approx 61" x 26".

-madmax
 

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Hi Madmax,

I will be curious to see what others say about your query...

From my perspective, tool selection and use, is on a spectrum understanding and skill set...solely dependant on the person using the tool...whether it is a power or hand tool.

As such (using your example of table saw) I have seen folks spend fortunes on really super expensive table saw setups ($20K range) and other build there own (Some of the Amish I have worked with over the years) and the tool had little impact on the quality of work they produced...Big and expensive does not equal efficient excellence of work (relatively)...that is achieved out of the skills of the operator...An expensive saw might make things easier, yet by comparison (big picture) I have found it seldom makes that big a difference overall, and I have used both expensive and homemade table saws...

With that said, I think your Ryobi should be more than efficient and adequate enough to achieve your goals. Put a good thin kerf blade on it, true up the fence, and make some test cuts...that will tell you the most of what you want to know. As I often remind students...Humans have been making beautiful things from wood for millenia before power tools came along. I still only use (when I use a table saw) a simple contractors 10" Table Saw from Rigid.

I still prefer the more traditional methods of woodworking of..."Tool through material"...whether that tool is electric or muscle powered...and not pushing material through a tool...

Hope that helps...

j
 

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RAM Man
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The Ryobi would probably do the job however I'm not sure how happy you would be with it. I recently had to go half way across the country and help my son get his house ready to sell. We had to do some remodeling and as he didn't have a table saw I purchased that Ryobi saw for the project. This saw only has a 12" rip capacity on the right side of the blade which is very limiting to say the least. While I was able to square the fence up fairly easily it did require hand measuring to double check every time I had to move the fence. Also, be prepared for a sawdust bath every time you make a cut. I would also suggest that the expense of a good to high quality general purpose or combination saw blade is a must for using the Ryobi or the Craftsman.
 

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Those are exactly the type of saws most people gravitate to because they're inexpensive, readily available, and don't know any better. You were smart enough to ask, so I won't sugar coat the truth. Those saws are too small, too light, too loud, too flimsy, too inaccurate, too unreliable, too expensive to fix, too hard to resell for a decent price, too limited, nearly impossible to upgrade or grow with, and to top it off they're less safe to use. They'll cut, but are just not overly pleasant or accurate to use.

If price is the driving factor toward those cheap plastic wonders, buy a good full size used contractor saw with a belt drive induction motor and a decent fence (or at least a chance of upgrading to a decent fence).

Check out the difference in the size of the "landing zone" in front of the blade, which is the space that you have to get a board flush, settled, and square to the fence before the wood contacts the blade. (BTW, the DW saw shown is built a little better than the Ryobi and Craftsman you showed, but is still small, light, and loud)

 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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Which model of Ryobi are you referring to?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Those are exactly the type of saws most people gravitate to because they're inexpensive, readily available, and don't know any better. You were smart enough to ask, so I won't sugar coat the truth. Those saws are too small, too light, too loud, too flimsy, too inaccurate, too unreliable, too expensive to fix, too hard to resell for a decent price, too limited, nearly impossible to upgrade or grow with, and to top it off they're less safe to use. They'll cut, but are just not overly pleasant or accurate to use.

If price is the driving factor toward those cheap plastic wonders, buy a good full size used contractor saw with a belt drive induction motor and a decent fence (or at least a chance of upgrading to a decent fence).

Check out the difference in the size of the "landing zone" in front of the blade, which is the space that you have to get a board flush, settled, and square to the fence before the wood contacts the blade. (BTW, the DW saw shown is built a little better than the Ryobi and Craftsman you showed, but is still small, light, and loud)

Is the one you're talking about? (see photograph)
 

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I don't think you would be happy with using the Ryobi, really limiting. The really short distance in front of the blade will be a source of frustration and a hazard. The 24 tooth blade provided might be good for rough cutting 2x4s, not for cabinet work. With either of the two saws you should break down sheet goods into smaller pieces using a straight edge and a circle saw. Build an out-feed table. Add weight to any light saw to make it more stable, bucket of sand? A passable combination blade will cost $30-50.

If you are going to cut miters make yourself a sled. Make interchangeable stops for left & right 45s and 90*.
 

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i have a 10" 15 amp Ryobi contractors saw, factory re-comditioned, $125 delivered. Is it the best? i doubt it. Is it a foot in the door and an upgrade from using a skilsaw or a jig saw? you bet. I upgraded the rip fence with 1/2" x 4" aluminum plate, bought a good thin kerf rip blade, and always double check that the rip fence is square. i bought a compound sliding miter saw that can do 12" crosscuts, so I mainly use the Ryobi to rip.
 
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