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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am fairly new to wood turning and wondered if anyone has used a rust inhibitor on their lathe or if this is not done?

It seems like this would be great at preventing issues that may happen due to wet wood or other wet items such as finish hitting the lathe.

If you do what are the best products to get for this?

Thanks,
Michael
 

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I jst use a paste wax on the bed, same as I do all cast iron tools.:thumbsup:
 

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Turning wet wood will create a lot of free water.

Do not leave wet wood shavings on the lathe bed, even for a short time. You will return to find superficial rust. Easy to remove but will be a reminder that wet wood needs to be cleaned up ASAP.

The cheapest and simplest method to prevent rust is to use WD-40 before and after turning the wet wood. Other methods work, such as Johnsons Paste Wax, Boeshield T9, but most people have WD-40 on hand.

If you are using dry wood, then use WD-40 ever now and again, more for lubrication than rust prevention.
 

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Not an inhibitor but I use a rust converter when I clean any of my tools (TS tops, lathe, jointer, etc). It converts rust from iron oxide to iron phosphate. When dry I go over with steel wool and then use wax, WD40, or other products.
It is available at any automotive store as Osphos, RustMort, or other names; it is also available at HD in a spray just called Rust Converter. It will turn the rust black as it converts it so any pits or crevices are rust free.
 

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I use Boeshield T-90. Doesn't need to be applied often (or thick), just a quick spritz and rub down.

Prior to getting this I used MinWax paste wax -- it worked well, but took a little more rubbing to get it spread evenly across the length of the ways.

Side note: there is a school of thought (I heard Kurt Hertzog attribute it to David Ellsworth) saying "a little rust is a good thing -- it prevents the tailstock from slipping when you crank the ram tight, when you get a new lathe sprinkle a little water on it."

Maybe if you're a professional turner and the cost of a new lathe isn't huge in the scheme of things ... but not me!
 

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I use Boeshield T-90. Doesn't need to be applied often (or thick), just a quick spritz and rub down.

Prior to getting this I used MinWax paste wax -- it worked well, but took a little more rubbing to get it spread evenly across the length of the ways.

Side note: there is a school of thought (I heard Kurt Hertzog attribute it to David Ellsworth) saying "a little rust is a good thing -- it prevents the tailstock from slipping when you crank the ram tight, when you get a new lathe sprinkle a little water on it."

Maybe if you're a professional turner and the cost of a new lathe isn't huge in the scheme of things ... but not me!
I can see that. My tailstock slips a little after being freshly waxed. I cant stand rust on my tools though!
 

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I also use WD-40 it is a water displacer. You could also use mineral oil, and I've also heard of others using boiled linseed oil.

@ NCPaladin; Would the rust converter work on a vehicle? I've heard of it before but never used it.
 

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Would the rust converter work on a vehicle? I've heard of it before but never used it.
Yep, that is why almost any automotive store will have it for restoration projects (AutoZone, Pep Boys, Advanced, etc). Some hardware store will also have it.
On heavy rusted items I use a cup brush in my angle grinder to get rid of the worst as it need to penetrate the rust as well as it can.
 
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WD-40 works fine. Most professional turners I know use it also. Just spray a little on and wipe it off. I also use the same rag to wipe down the tool rest and underside of the banjo to make everything slide well.
If you are turning woods with a lot of tanin in them like Oak or Ash, expecially green wood I spray the lathe before I start and then wipe it down and coat it again afterwords or anytime I have to leave the lathe for a while such as lunch or overnight. Those woods will really rust a lathe or any other metal surface they touch.
 

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Johnson floor/paste wax on my stuff, wd40 on tools. Dunno why, it's just what granddad taught me.

20/20...rust converter is prefect for vehicles. And anything rusty...stops the oxidation process.
 

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Thanks NCPaladin and Priusjames; didn't mean to switch topics, I have a 99npr truck that I really like and am trying to keep it running as long as possible. The winter roads up here can really tear a vehicle apart.
 
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