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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #81 · (Edited)
At $13 on clearance, I figured that it'd be worth it to pick up, even if I don't use it as my main box in the shop.


You're right that a panel in the detached garage requires a it's own main breaker. I wasn't thinking about that when I bought it. I guess I could put a main cut-off outside and then run it into the interior box... but that does seem to be a lot more complicated and doesn't give me a whole lot for the effort. plus, I'd have to run outside to kill the power in case of an emergency...



I'll keep looking for something with a dedicated main and/or 8-10 breaker slots.
 

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lots of small panels out there. main, 2- 240 circuits, 2- 20 amp outlet circuits and a 15 amp lighting circuits; add up to 9 breaker spaces. you can use the mini breakers and have plenty of expansion space in a ten breaker panel.

home depot has this ten breaker panel for $50 with the main breaker, ground and neutral buss. technically every outlet in a garage needs to be gfic protected. i doubt anyone here with a garage shop follows that rule. only gfic outlets in my shop are outside

 

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I am in a similar situation right now actually. In the previous house, I had my shop right in the basement, just like yours. However, now I need to make it in the garage, and I have to be honest, it has been a while since I have last seen such a bad garage.
That DIY forum has a sub-forum just for electrical and is owned by the same people as this one. When asking an electrical question it is important to say where you are, codes, voltages etc vary.
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
It's been about 3 years since this was an active topic, but I should probably say what I ended up doing.

First off, I gave up on the Garage. I don't like the options in the structure. It's in a poor location (too close to the house, but too far away for 50' wires). It just was not suitable for my dual-purpose needs (single door width is too small to split into a two separate doors), the wring conduit diameter and existing wiring is/was inadequate. It just wasn't worth my time. If we remain here long-term, I'm going to want a different structure in a different location with better service options, anyway.

So I set up in my basement, where climate control and wiring made everything much easier. I only have a little over 7' of headroom, but I was able to enclose a 13'x30' area. I still need an exterior door, and the basement still leaks in places, but it allowed me to get going on work again.
 

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I had about 50' of run on my garage. First I ran a quick 10 guage wire and realized it wasn't enough for what I was intending to do, and ran a 100 amp service. Now I'm covered. If I put a new furnace in this next spring I intend to have the old furnace put in the garage. It has one vent from the regular furnace and a heating/cooling room unit in it . But the old furnace would be quicker to run it up to the temperature I like....

Great to be acclimated.....You can walk away at anytime...
 

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This was talked about a lot earlier, and didn't have time to read every post, but saw a lot of varying affirmations. My understanding is that with most if not all residential syst, the earth and neutral are ONLY bonded at the point of the first cutoff inwards from the service entrance, and NOWHERE downstream. At this point, there should be bonded two acceptable and certain grouns. There are a lot of words that define that in greater depth, but AFAIK, this info rules
 
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