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Which is best for dadoes? I currently have a PC 7518 fixed base router, but want to know if a table saw with dadoes is better for whatever reason.
:shifty:
 

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It maybe a preference issue for thru dados. For stopped dados, there's no choice but a plunge router or use a router table.

For thru dados, I like using the table saw with the dado set. It's easier IMO to control the stock and I get a clean cut end to end.

Tom
 

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It depends on what I am doing...but if I can, I always use a router for 3/4 dados....so much cleaner then a stacked head and no one likes a wobble head.
Really? The router gives a cleaner cut, even in plywood? I've never tried using the router for dados, just figured the dado blade would be cleaner. Guess what I'm trying tomorrow.

--Darrell
 

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If I am making anything with a thin wood bottom, like a plywood bottom in a drawer, I use a wobble dado blade...quick to set, and the convex cut doesn't matter....rabbits, I use the table saw, blade height and fence to cut, and dado cuts, I use a clamp on fence and run the router...easy to control, and I can plane wood to fit precisely....at least, that is how I like to do it.
 

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I'll use both, just depends on how many I have to do and the size of the work piece, but mostly use the router. Most of the time when building cabinets I don't have any help, so the router is much lighter than strugling to keep a sheet straight. If I've only got a couple to do, it's easy to slap on my guide jig and knock them out with the router also.
 

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95% of the time I use my tablesaw with a stacked dado. My dado will cut very clean dado's with zero chipout. It's a Freud dado with a 12 tooth blade 2 tooth chippers and a 5º negative rake.
 

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If I'm using American plywood (read: cheap and full of voids), I will use the router as I have 1/2" and 3/4" bits designed for the "less than advertised thickness". If I'm using Baltic Birch, which I use as often as possible, I will use the stacked dado as I can put in the exact amount of chippers and the fit is perfect. Ain't it weird that metric ply is closer to our own thickness than American is?
 

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.........I will use the router as I have 1/2" and 3/4" bits designed for the "less than advertised thickness". If I'm using Baltic Birch, which I use as often as possible, I will use the stacked dado as I can put in the exact amount of chippers and the fit is perfect.
For cabinet carcasses and the like I use two routers. One set up with a bearing to cut a rabbet in the ends of the bottoms, tops or whatever that leaves 1/2" of stock sticking out 1/4 or 5/16ths. The dadoes in the sides I cut 1/2"wide by 1/4 or 5/16ths strong deep.

The shoulder of the rabbet on the shelves goes towards the visable side. This gives the best looking joint, and it doesn't matter what the thickness the plywood is.

If a shelf is a little too tight in a dado done conventionally, it will cause a kink in the side. If you make it loose, you either get a lousy fit or else have to shim it tight to the visible side before gluing up.

With a rabbet, you can make the buried section loose so it doesn't kink the sides, and get an even better looking joint that with a full width dado.

Regards,
jimc
 

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Cutting Dados

Hi All;
I may as well put in my two cents. We us a Forrest stacked dado set, and metal shims.

We have a stack of "templates" made from MDF with dados cut in them.
Since we buy different brands of plywood, and they all vary in thickness, we put the template on the edge of the plywood, (or hardwood), to see which one fits properly. Each template lists which stacked chippers to use, with which metal shims. It took longer to write this than it does to actually do it.

A hold down is required, as the plywood may have some warp to it. We also use the table saw for stopped dados, by putting a pencil mark on the fence, marking where to start, and where to stop. We prefer the table saw mainly due to the dust collection system.
As far as getting a straight cut over an eight foot length, we use the ezee-feed device, so that is not an issue. Not meant to be a plug for ezee-feed, but it does make it easy.
 
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