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Do I really need one?

The top piece of my (lets still say experimental) torsion box router table top is too thin for a conventional mitre track (they all seem to require a 1/2" deep channel). So, I'm thinking I could:
Leave the mitre slot out entirely
Rout a mitre slot (1" x 3/8") directly in the table top (no track)
Install a "T" track where the mitre slot would normally go

Thinking back, I can't recall that I've ever used the mitre track in my little bench-top router table.

Any advice?

Is a "T" track in the mitre slot position of any actual use?

Somewhere on here I've read of some sort of a sacrificial sled, riding against the fence, that some have used to substitute for a mitre slot/guide. Anybody have any info on that arrangement?
 

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We've got three table mounted routers in the shop I teach in (and for the last 30 years) , and I've never wished any of them had a miter or t-slot track. You'll be fine without one. Just make sure you have a good fence (or a couple) and a way to clamp it in (any) place and in any direction on the top.
 

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John
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Almost everything on a router table is optional except maybe the fence and that isn't really needed if all you use are bearinged bits. I have a dual miter/t-track running the length of the table and two t-tracks to clamp the fence with but that is exactly what they are used for, clamps. I could do without either but they are handy places to position featherboards, jigs and other gadgets used to do the job.
 
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I do not use the miter track very often, but when I do it is essential. Think about small items mounted on and clamped to a sled. Or like Jschaben has stated.

George
 

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Two of my tables have tracks just for the box joint & dovetail jigs I made. So very rarely do I use feather boards (only for long pieces) I could otherwise do without.
 

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Master firewood maker
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if i were in your position, i would probably wait until i thought i really needed it (or have convinced myself it would help alot) before i put one in.

it's a whole lot easier to put one later than it is to take it out later if you decide you'd rather not have it.
 

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John
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Somewhere on here I've read of some sort of a sacrificial sled, riding against the fence, that some have used to substitute for a mitre slot/guide. Anybody have any info on that arrangement?
Maybe you were thinking of something like this. It's what I use for cope cuts instead of a coping sled. About a foot per leg with sacrificial faces.:smile:
The thing just slides along the fence, doesn't engage the miter slot at all.
 

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it's too late for your table top

Since your top is so thin, and a routed slot would weaken it, I'd forget it. What most router tables have is a means to pivot the fence at one or both ends. My tops, the Bench Dog Pros have slots milled at 90 degrees to the front edge: Bench Dog Tools 40-102 ProMax Cast Iron Router Table Extension - Amazon.com


There is only one reason for a miter slot parallel to the front edge which would be for the use of a coping sled: Woodpeckers Coping Sled - Amazon.com


Your issue will be where to put any holes for pivoting bolts OR how to make your fence to be easily clamped without holes. One way is to make a long fence from 2 -1" X 3" pieces joined at 90 degrees so that it will stand vertically, like an "L". You can then clamp it anyplace on the table and at any angle. Fences need not be parallel to the front edge! Like this: 32" L Table Fence Pre-drilled By Peachtree Woodworking - PW1098 - Amazon.com
 

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jschaben said:
Almost everything on a router table is optional except maybe the fence and that isn't really needed if all you use are bearinged bits. I have a dual miter/t-track running the length of the table and two t-tracks to clamp the fence with but that is exactly what they are used for, clamps. I could do without either but they are handy places to position featherboards, jigs and other gadgets used to do the job.
I agree. The combination track is the way to go.

Versatility, Versatility, Versatility!!!

I don't use the miter slot portion often but when I do I'm glad I sprang for the little extra expense.

I bought one of these kits and use it for a positive stop jig when I need a stop on my RT among other things.
 
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