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Still researching and getting things lined up for my table saw reburb and surround build over the winter. Trying to gather up all the verious parts and pieces Ill need. The far right end of the surround/workcenter will be a router table. Still havnt decided if Im going to build a seperate fence or use the TS fence but thats not of concern right now. The topic of the day is inserts! My plans call for a router insert plate and Im clueless!

Okay, Ive owned my router for a couple of years now. Its a POS that I absolutely hate and I hate the table its mounted on even more. I plan to make a huge upgrade and purchase a Triton that will be mounted in the table. I have no plans to add a lift as the Triton routers get excellent reviews for table mounting without a lift. My current table is a cheapy and dosnt have an insert. I have no experience with inserts nor do I have a clue what thier benefits are besides giving a thinner surface to mount the router. I also dont know what all the various rings that fit in the inserts are about. Please educate me on router inserts. Id also like to hear opinions on the best insert and why you thing it is the best. I know theres a ton of them out there.
 

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I recently redid my router extension in my table saw and got a rockler router plate. I'm in love with it so far compared to my previous plate which was just MDF. Get greater bit height being its thinner. As or the inserts that go in it, they're meant to keep the empty space around the bit to a minimum which keeps your work piece from possibly dropping down. Rockler screwed me and didn't include the free insert so for the time being I'm using it without one. I've also included a picture of my router table fence that plays off my saw fence to give you an idea. I love it and have had no problems so far with it. The picture doesn't show the new plate so don't think that's what rockler sells haha.
 

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I can't be of much help in answering your questions - I have no experience using a router table, and am currently in the process of building my first one.

However, this is what I ordered for a mounting plate/insert: http://www.grizzly.com/parts/PT10432047

I purchased it after having come across this thread while doing research on router tables: http://www.routerforums.com/table-mounted-routing/37331-13-mounting-plate.html

As far as I can tell, and from what others have said, it is the same plate as the All-In-One Router Plate Kit that MLCS sells for $35 here: http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...tacc1.html#All_In_One_router_plate_kit_anchor Includes everything the MLCS one does, but for a much lower price.

I don't have my router table completed yet, but I am pleased with the quality of the mounting plate I ordered from Grizzly, and for only $13, the price couldn't be beat. (I'm also doing this build on a budget, so the price appealed to me too. Even if I had more money to spend, I'd probably buy the same plate/insert again, even though I have yet to mount it in a table and use it.)
 

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I recently redid my router extension in my table saw and got a rockler router plate. I'm in love with it so far compared to my previous plate which was just MDF. Get greater bit height being its thinner. As or the inserts that go in it, they're meant to keep the empty space around the bit to a minimum which keeps your work piece from possibly dropping down. Rockler screwed me and didn't include the free insert so for the time being I'm using it without one. I've also included a picture of my router table fence that plays off my saw fence to give you an idea. I love it and have had no problems so far with it. The picture doesn't show the new plate so don't think that's what rockler sells haha.
Just had to say that I love what you did with the fence. Very nice!
 

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A big, heavy router like the Triton want's an aluminum or steel plate to keep from sagging under that weight. And Rockler sells plates that are already bored for some routers. BIG timesaver! And prevents some serious mis-drilling that may ruin your plate. I like MLCS plates too; always free shipping, even on sale items, and the round inserts are inter-changeable between the two.

BTW, sharing the TS and RT fence is a bad idea....cripples both devices. You WILL find yourself one day needing to either saw another piece OR rout another piece and to do so, you'll have to disrupt one of the setups. Which means...BOTH setups are now disturbed. 60 years of woodworking is suggesting it will happen....often is more likely!
 

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I recently redid my router extension in my table saw and got a rockler router plate. I'm in love with it so far compared to my previous plate which was just MDF. Get greater bit height being its thinner. As or the inserts that go in it, they're meant to keep the empty space around the bit to a minimum which keeps your work piece from possibly dropping down. Rockler screwed me and didn't include the free insert so for the time being I'm using it without one. I've also included a picture of my router table fence that plays off my saw fence to give you an idea. I love it and have had no problems so far with it. The picture doesn't show the new plate so don't think that's what rockler sells haha.
Not meaning to hijacking the thread but I notice that's the r4512 I have been wanting to put a router table in that spot on mine. Any tips. It's something I been wanting to do forever lol I just never have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies so far guys.

A big, heavy router like the Triton want's an aluminum or steel plate to keep from sagging under that weight. And Rockler sells plates that are already bored for some routers. BIG timesaver! And prevents some serious mis-drilling that may ruin your plate. I like MLCS plates too; always free shipping, even on sale items, and the round inserts are inter-changeable between the two.

BTW, sharing the TS and RT fence is a bad idea....cripples both devices. You WILL find yourself one day needing to either saw another piece OR rout another piece and to do so, you'll have to disrupt one of the setups. Which means...BOTH setups are now disturbed. 60 years of woodworking is suggesting it will happen....often is more likely!
Yeah, thats why I mentioned the router I plan to use. It looks bulky and I know some of the plates are made of a plastic material and some are aluminum. I didnt realize I could get steel but I havnt looked at all the options either.

The fence is something Ive thought about but havnt thought seriously about it. I know many people prefer to use the TS fence and many prefer a seperate fence for the the reasons you just mentioned. Im still not 100% positive what Im going to do yet in that regard but Im leaning strongly toward giving the router its own fence.

If anyone else has opinions, Ill gladly hear em. Like I said, I know little about routers and nothing about insert plates.
 

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John
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Thanks for the replies so far guys.



Yeah, thats why I mentioned the router I plan to use. It looks bulky and I know some of the plates are made of a plastic material and some are aluminum. I didnt realize I could get steel but I havnt looked at all the options either.

The fence is something Ive thought about but havnt thought seriously about it. I know many people prefer to use the TS fence and many prefer a seperate fence for the the reasons you just mentioned. Im still not 100% positive what Im going to do yet in that regard but Im leaning strongly toward giving the router its own fence.

If anyone else has opinions, Ill gladly hear em. Like I said, I know little about routers and nothing about insert plates.
What bladeburner said is right on. I don't know of any steel plates but that doesn't mean there aren't any out there. The two choices are generally phenolic or aluminum. The problem with the cheaper aluminum ones is that some aren't hard anodized. I wore through the anodizing on a MLCS plate in less than a year and the raw aluminum left black aluminum oxide marks on the work pieces. A real joy to try to sand off:thumbdown:
I ended up going with a INCRA, 3/8" thick aluminum plate and have been very satisfied, well, except for the price, they are spendy.
http://www.incrementaltools.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=MLPALUMINUM

Especially if you opt for the additional inserts. IMO, the inserts are an important safety device though. If you have the hole sized for a big 3"+ panel raiser and then stick a 1/4" straight bit in there, there is an awful lot of unsupported area around the bit. Much better to choke it down with an insert that has a 3/8" hole.
 

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In case you haven't noticed, there are two "standard" sizes for router table inserts. This almost bit me when I was ordering one for an existing table. Rockler and Bench Dog use 8 1/4" X 11 3/4". Incra, JessEm, Woodpekers, and Kreg use 9 1/4" X 11 3/4". Important info if you've got an existing table. Not so much if you build your table to match the plate.
 

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IMO one of the nicest features of the Triton is the ability to change bits from above the table so the only real benefit I see in using a plate is to be able to change inserts for different sized bits. On the other hand you could do as I did and mount the router directly to the top and make your own inserts...

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/router-table-build-pics-54980/

http://s29.photobucket.com/user/MrM...Build/PART_1378163565125_zps78e5fd6b.jpg.html



Also, I see it mentioned quite frequently that one benefit of a thinner plate is that you don't lose bit height ability however that would not be an issue even with a 3/4" thick top as the Triton collet extends well past the bottom of the router plus it has a shaft lock allowing 1 wrench bit changes (my top is 1" thick and even my Porter Cable router extends far enough to change bits from above)




In case you haven't noticed, there are two "standard" sizes for router table inserts. This almost bit me when I was ordering one for an existing table. Rockler and Bench Dog use 8 1/4" X 11 3/4". Incra, JessEm, Woodpekers, and Kreg use 9 1/4" X 11 3/4". Important info if you've got an existing table. Not so much if you build your table to match the plate.
You gotta watch the corner radius as well since all are not rounded the same (you can guess how I know!)
 

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Get an aluminum plate. They don't move.

When I made a router extension table, I used the ts fence for the router, with a fence clamped to it.
I soon needed to rip a piece, and had to upset the router set up.
A couple of dados and t track, and was using a separate fence.
 

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Someone gave me a cast iron tablesaw wing, with an aluminum plate, and the big Triton router. I use it sometimes, but haven't figured out a good dust collection system for it, and when I've had it set up, it got in the way of using the tablesaw more than a few times. I like the way the Triton lifts the collet above the table, but it's really not any easier, or takes fewer trial and error goes to get something set up just right.

On a recent project, I needed 5 router tops setup. I made the ones in the picture linked below. The top is synthetic bowling alley flooring. It's a little less than 3/8" thick. I plunged a 1/2" bit up through it. The cutter for the profile bits works above the table. No dust goes below the table.

The fence was run in the same planer run as the parts, so it's exactly the same thickness. No hold-down pressure fingers were needed. Around the cutter, the fence has a larger hole cut with a holesaw. The PVC riser covers an intake air hole, and makes it safer for fingers, as well as keeps dust and chunks from getting thrown out. Dust collection is absolutely 100% complete with only a ShopVac. The C-clamps are not much trouble and make it easy to adjust the fence a hair one way or the other.

The 7518 base takes no more time to fiddle with for fine tuning than the twist knobs on the Triton. It will be a rare time when I set up the router wing, instead of cobbling one of these together.

http://www.historic-house-restoration.com/images/windows3_0052.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I can see where your little contraption would come in handy on a jobsite. This will be a stationary tool in my shop. It wont in the table saw wing so to speak but rather a little further away. It would never be in the way unless I was making a full capacity rip at 30" which would be very rare for me. Ill just be sure the router isnt set up when/if I need to make a rip that wide.

Ive read sooooo many router reviews and they all lead me to the Triton router. The big 3 1/4 horse Triton is the same price on Amazon as the 2 1/4 horse PC thats on sale at Woodcraft right now. On top of the super easy height adjustment, I really like the abillity to change bits above the table without having to reach under the table to hold a lock.

Anyone have opinions on the Woodpecker router plate? It has the same specs as the Incra and its the same price. I like the silver and red one better than the gold one, lol.
 

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Anyone have opinions on the Woodpecker router plate? It has the same specs as the Incra and its the same price. I like the silver and red one better than the gold one, lol.
When I was shopping for them I compared the two. The primary difference I found was the mounting of the ring inserts. The Woodpecker has twist lock rings that require a tool to change. The Incra has magnetic inserts. I went with the Incra
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
When I was shopping for them I compared the two. The primary difference I found was the mounting of the ring inserts. The Woodpecker has twist lock rings that require a tool to change. The Incra has magnetic inserts. I went with the Incra
Yeah that was the biggest difference I saw. Just wondering if I missed something.
 

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John
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In case you haven't noticed, there are two "standard" sizes for router table inserts. This almost bit me when I was ordering one for an existing table. Rockler and Bench Dog use 8 1/4" X 11 3/4". Incra, JessEm, Woodpekers, and Kreg use 9 1/4" X 11 3/4". Important info if you've got an existing table. Not so much if you build your table to match the plate.
There are several more. Rouseau uses a 9x12 as did MLCS until recently. Peachtree also sells 9 x 12. For some unknown reason MLCS switched to 9-1/32 x 12-3/32" Hartville tool used to carry a real oddball size, I don't recollect exactly but I see now they have gone with 9x12.

Most of the major brands (INCRA, Woodpecker, KREG, Woodhaven) stay with 9-1/4 x 11-3/4 as that is what the more popular lifts are. Just be careful when ordering one.:smile:
As has also been mentioned, you need to pay attention to the corner radius too.
 

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Lilman, If you cut open the slots, where the t bolts, attach the fence, when you need to make a rip, without moving the router fence, you can, clamp down the router fence, then slide the ts fence over to use, without loosing the router setup.
 

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John
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Lilman, If you cut open the slots, where the t bolts, attach the fence, when you need to make a rip, without moving the router fence, you can, clamp down the router fence, then slide the ts fence over to use, without loosing the router setup.
Why not just put the t-bolts in a drawer and use clamps? Don't see a reason to destroy the t-slots, you may want to go back to them sometime.:blink:
 

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I went w/the Kreg plate. It is pretty standard plate.
Pre-drilled for my router...but had to countersink the holes
to fit the screws that mount my router...but no biggie.
Works well.
Table Furniture Wood
 
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