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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There seems to be a lot of talk on here and elsewhere about variable speed routers and their advantage. It started me to wonder what settings are appropriate for various materials. Are there any tables showing this? I did a couple of searches on here but didn't find a lot.

Charlie
 

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With larger bits they are really handy, but with smaller bits not so much. Most of the speed charts I've seen were more related to bit size than the material being worked. I do sometimes adjust speed for certain woods, or some combination of circumstances that causes burning. Cherry is a great example, made worse by using bits that aren't factory sharp. If you search you'll find several. I tried to link the Freud chart, but I can never get a pdf file link correctly for some reason.
 

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I tend to set my router to a lower speed and leave it. My Bosch router has speed setting 1 - 5. I forget what each speed for a given setting.

Single speed routers run too fast for my liking.

Freud Canada has a PDF chart. Not worth linking. Easy to just re-type

Up to 1in dia - 24,000 rpm max
1 1/4in - 2in dia - 18,000 rpm max
2 1/4in - 2 1/2in - 16,000 rpm max
3 in - 3 1/2in - 12,000 rpm max
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I tend to set my router to a lower speed and leave it. My Bosch router has speed setting 1 - 5. I forget what each speed for a given setting.

Single speed routers run too fast for my liking.

Freud Canada has a PDF chart. Not worth linking. Easy to just re-type

Up to 1in dia - 24,000 rpm max
1 1/4in - 2in dia - 18,000 rpm max

Thanks Dave. Would the above apply equally to say poplar and hard maple?

Charlie
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
With larger bits they are really handy, but with smaller bits not so much. Most of the speed charts I've seen were more related to bit size than the material being worked. I do sometimes adjust speed for certain woods, or some combination of circumstances that causes burning. Cherry is a great example, made worse by using bits that aren't factory sharp. If you search you'll find several. I tried to link the Freud chart, but I can never get a pdf file link correctly for some reason.
After I posted this thread I did Google and saw the same information. Some of it is more confusing then helpful.

Charlie
 

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After I posted this thread I did Google and saw the same information. Some of it is more confusing then helpful.

Charlie
Hi Charlie - What the speed control actually is doing is controlling the tip speed. for example, the cutter on a 3" dia bit is traveling roughly 3 times faster than the cutter on a 1" dia bit at any given rpm. :smile:
 

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With any rotary cutting tool there is an ideal speed, both for efficiency and safety, measured in feet per minute (FPM), that the tips of the cutters must rotate at. As this is a constant the revolutions per minute (RPM) the tool turns at must be adjusted accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
With any rotary cutting tool there is an ideal speed, both for efficiency and safety, measured in feet per minute (FPM), that the tips of the cutters must rotate at. As this is a constant the revolutions per minute (RPM) the tool turns at must be adjusted accordingly.
That is what I was looking for.:yes: Thanks.:thumbsup:
 
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