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I am building bunk beds for my two sons out of 2x6 and 2x4 pine. I want to use a roundover (is that right?) bit so the wood doesn't have a sharp edge. What size bit would be appropriate for the 2" (1.5") boards?

Thanks
 

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Wow, that was fast. My grandmother gave me the router when my grandfather passed away. Looks to be about 20 years old (Craftsman) and hardly used. I found a 3/8" roundover bit in the case. Thanks for the help.
 

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John
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Wow, that was fast. My grandmother gave me the router when my grandfather passed away. Looks to be about 20 years old (Craftsman) and hardly used. I found a 3/8" roundover bit in the case. Thanks for the help.
Hi - 3/8 should be fine. As a point of reference, most all pine 2x stock I've seen already has the edges eased with a 1/4" roundover:smile:.
 

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Old School
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You didn't describe which type of round over bit you have. It could be an all steel bit with no bearing but with just a stub guide.
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It could be a round over bit with no guide designed to be used with a fence.
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Or it could be a carbide tipped bit with a bearing. The bearing size should be a diameter that when used it sets the cutting edge flush with the edge of the wood to be profiled. IOW, looking at the bottom of the bit the flutes width on the bit should be the width of the bearing.
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The carbide tipped bit with a bearing would be your best cutting easiest to use bit. If you have it with a ½" shank all the better. With care, a ¼" shank will work fine. You will get a cleaner smoother profile by making several depth passes. One or two for most of the profile, and the last pass just a skim pass.

The direction on the wood can make a difference on which way the grain direction lays. Your cuts will be smoother by cutting along the grain. Some grain direction is more directional where you would be plowing into it which can cause splintering and tear out. You will get a feeling for that with a little experience.

If the bearing is smaller, the cutting edge will rout into the edge leaving a step instead of a smooth transition of the curve. If the bearing is too large, it will only round a small portion of the top of the wood being profiled.

You can use the round over bit to create a stepped profile by dropping the bearing lower on the edge, which allows the top of the flute to make a step.
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This diagram will help you to have a quick reference to routing feed direction, whether you use the router handheld, or table mounted.
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