Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a Milwaukee 5625 router I'm going to be mounting into a table. I know that this specific router does not REQUIRE a lift to be put into a table but you can use it with a lift.

My question is, does anyone disagree that a router lift is nicer? I know if I don't buy the Woodpecker lift I'm looking at it will save me $300, but am I correct in assuming use of the router and table with be somewhat more tedious and difficult?

I don't want to waste money if the lift offers no benefit but at the same time, I'm happy to spend the $300 if it will make my life significantly easier.

Thanks!
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
I have a Milwaukee 5625 router I'm going to be mounting into a table. I know that this specific router does not REQUIRE a lift to be put into a table but you can use it with a lift.

My question is, does anyone disagree that a router lift is nicer? I know if I don't buy the Woodpecker lift I'm looking at it will save me $300, but am I correct in assuming use of the router and table with be somewhat more tedious and difficult?

I don't want to waste money if the lift offers no benefit but at the same time, I'm happy to spend the $300 if it will make my life significantly easier.

Thanks!
I use a Freud 3000 which has the built in lift and haven't found a need to install one. My recommendation would be to try it without, you can always drop $300 on a lift if you feel the need.
A lift may be slightly more precise. My 3000 will raise about .005" when I engage the plunge lock. Not typically an amount to be concerned about and much of time I just leave it unlocked as I didn't remove the springs. I wouldn't think a lift would do that but, again, .005 is hardly significant for most wood working.:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
Wood magazine recently rated the Milwaukee 5625-20 the top router for under-table use, with the Triton coming in right behind it. I would think that putting this router in a lift would be a waste of money, as it's designed to be used under the table without the need of a lift. It came with a crank, didn't it?

I have the big Triton under my table and have no need for a lift. John says his Freud moves .005" when he locks it down. I checked my Triton and it drops .002", not enough for me to worry about. I got the Triton rather than add a lift to my PC 7518, as the new router was less money than a lift for the big PC.

The only thing I think you gain by going to a lift is maybe not having to reach under the table to lock the height. But it's your money.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
Given the price of lifts, I personally would accept some minor inconvenience to save that cost. I have a 5625 in a lift, but in my case the lift came first. I bought it used and had a PC 7518 in it. Fortunately for me, that same lift will also work the 5625, and I switched the PC out for one (that lift did require a new "clamp", about $20). But had I started from scratch with the 5625, I would not have bought a lift. They're nice, but not worth the price if your router is already set to go in a table.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,567 Posts
I love my Jessem Mast R Lift II

Here's why. The built in height adjustment on the Milwaukee 5625-20 which I also have, is a bit sloppy and requires you adjust "up" to the desired height. That's not a huge deal, but you still have to get underneath, release the clamp, adjust the height, get back underneath and reclamp, then recheck the height. :boat:

With the lift, you just dial it in, and turn the lock to hold the setting. Done. The threads on the lifts are finely machined, not cast like on the routers. You can make it work, but you will enjoy the lift once you get one...or more... :eek::yes:

http://jessem.com/MAST-R-LIFT.html
 
  • Like
Reactions: mdntrdr

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
A lift is a real investment but the way I looked at it I wanted to build things with my limited shop not adjust things with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
I have a wing on a table saw, and a lift in a dedicated router table.

The only thing I use the one in the wing is for dados that I can use the regular fence for. It's too much trouble to set up a dedicated fence on it, and when I did it ended up getting in the way of using the table saw. It makes a mess with sawdust too.

The router table with lift is very handy for quick setups.

My absolute favorites are homemade rigs. I had five of them set up for a big sash job. Shown in the link below. The top is a piece of solid phenolic bowling alley flooring. I mounted it to a 7518, and plunged a 1/2 bit through it after it was mounted to the router. I routed out material around that hole to give some clearance for a router bit, but it left at least 1/8" thickness with only a 1/2 shank to come through, so that no sawdust goes down on the motor.

http://www.historic-house-restoration.com/images/windows3_004.JPG

The fence was run in the same planer run with the pieces to be profiled, so feather boards are not needed. The dust cap is also the holddown. The PVC riser is over an intake hole so the Shop Vac can get air, and not throw pieces out, as well as protection for fingers.

A Shop Vac is all that's needed to get absolutely every spec of dust and shavings. An added benefit that I didn't even think about is that the vacuum keeps the piece pulled up against the fence.

Just set the whole assembly on top of the table, and set the depth with a digital depth gauge.

I can set one of these up about as fast as I can set up the dedicated router table, dust collection is better than anything, and they moved the table saw wing to dadoes only. I keep the bowling alley bases on those routers, so it really doesn't take long to set one up.

http://www.historic-house-restoration.com/images/windows3_0052.JPG

With custom Whiteside bits, each profile was cut in one pass, and the finish was perfect.

The fence is easier to adjust than it looks like it would be. To move it one way or the other a couple of thousandths, put a sharp pencil mark on the table by one end of the fence, loosen that one clamp and tap the fence around relative to the pencil mark. Then retighten that clamp-really easier than anything else.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,933 Posts
I have a Milwaukee 5625 router I'm going to be mounting into a table. I know that this specific router does not REQUIRE a lift to be put into a table but you can use it with a lift.

My question is, does anyone disagree that a router lift is nicer? I know if I don't buy the Woodpecker lift I'm looking at it will save me $300, but am I correct in assuming use of the router and table with be somewhat more tedious and difficult?

I don't want to waste money if the lift offers no benefit but at the same time, I'm happy to spend the $300 if it will make my life significantly easier.

Thanks!
It all depends upon just how easy/hard it is to adjust the height of your router. With my Craftsman router the design is such that the ease of adjustment would make money for a lift to be wasted.

It is difficult to offer advise on a subject like this without experience on your router or an exact duplicate.

It also depends upon just how many times a day you are going to need to make an adjustment.

I could do a lot of manual adjustment for $300.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
All my router tables have been in TS wings so when I got a new TS I also got a new router.
First I had a small Bosch in cheap lift. Worked great but wanted more power.
Replaced it with a Freud 3000. Router was nice, but it was a pain to use compared to the old lift.
Now I have a 5625 in a nice lift. So so much nicer than the Freud. Yes, it would work without the lift, it surely wouldn't be the same.
If you use it a lot and can afford it, get lift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the advice and opinions. I think I am hearing what I was expecting to hear, which is the lift is by no means necessary, but it certainly is convenient! I think (correct me if not) that most everyone would agree that the lift is superior...the only arguement is whether or not with my router it is worth the money.

I never want to waste money (think fool and his money adage) but I can certainly afford the lift without much problem. It is almost hard to justify buying the lift because the router is "good enough" and you don't want to waste capabilities. I kind of think of this like you buy a house and want to renovate the kitchen...if the appliances are garbage you have no problem ripping them out but if they are acceptable, it is a lot harder to trash them and spend the money on what you really want.

I lean towards getting a lift but am still open to opinions. I know I have to do a lot of adjustments to pay for the $300, but otherwise I'm going to be perturbed every time I can't get it set correctly!
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Thanks for all the advice and opinions. I think I am hearing what I was expecting to hear, which is the lift is by no means necessary, but it certainly is convenient! I think (correct me if not) that most everyone would agree that the lift is superior...the only arguement is whether or not with my router it is worth the money.

I never want to waste money (think fool and his money adage) but I can certainly afford the lift without much problem. It is almost hard to justify buying the lift because the router is "good enough" and you don't want to waste capabilities. I kind of think of this like you buy a house and want to renovate the kitchen...if the appliances are garbage you have no problem ripping them out but if they are acceptable, it is a lot harder to trash them and spend the money on what you really want.

I lean towards getting a lift but am still open to opinions. I know I have to do a lot of adjustments to pay for the $300, but otherwise I'm going to be perturbed every time I can't get it set correctly!
I'll go back to my original suggestion. Try it without a lift and if you feel you need/want one, go ahead and get it. Everyone works a little different.:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
John's suggestion is good, if you don't have to buy a plate to try it out (that may be wasted money if you move to a lift). One point: you will be able to get it set correctly with out a lift, it will (maybe)just take a little more time/effort. But I think you've rationalized the points very well, and can only wish you luck with your decision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
If you are mounting into a table won't you always need a plate? I looked and nice plates are not cheap...that does push me toward buying the lift to start although I certainly think trying it out first without it is very reasonable.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,567 Posts
lifts come with plates

All you need for very basic table mounted router is a flat sheet of material, 3/4" thick, a hole large enough to have clearance around your largest cutter or the cutter you intend to use and a means to secure the router to the table from the top side....and accurate pattern from the base and countersunk screws.

You will have to get under the table and change the bit using 2 wrenches if necessary or 1 wrench with an shaft lock type router.

OR you can lift off the entire table which you have previously designed for that capability. Some foklks have made hinged top tables that swing back an allow access to the router chuck.
http://images.search.yahoo.com/sear...fr=ytff1-tyc-inbox&va=hinged+top+router+table

OR you can machine a depressed area for a commercial or home built router plate in the appropriate size and depth to fit that plate. Then you just lift out the plate with the router attached and change the bits.

You likin' a lift more better now...huh?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
<<You will have to get under the table and change the bit using 2 wrenches if necessary or 1 wrench with an shaft lock type router.

OR you can lift off the entire table which you have previously designed for that capability. Some foklks have made hinged top tables that swing back an allow access to the router chuck.
http://images.search.yahoo.com/searc...p+router+table

OR you can machine a depressed area for a commercial or home built router plate in the appropriate size and depth to fit that plate. Then you just lift out the plate with the router attached and change the bits.
>>


OR in the case of the Triton TRA001, raise the collet all the way up above the table at which point it automatically locks the shaft and you change the bit with one wrench - all above the table.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
If you are mounting into a table won't you always need a plate? I looked and nice plates are not cheap...that does push me toward buying the lift to start although I certainly think trying it out first without it is very reasonable.
Not necessarily, but it's another one of those debates like the one going on about the lift. The plate (yea, they are expensive) is something I wouldn't forgo, but a lot of folks have quite successfully. The cost of a plate doesn't come very close to a good lift, at least the last I looked...maybe it's changed. Whatever you do, you don't want the plate to be throwaway, they do cost to much for that. My very first router table was a Freud FT2000 plunger mounted to a Woodhaven plate. Everything was done under the table, including the tightening of the collet (it was a one wrench operation with this router. To raise it, you used the plunge mechanism, then you had to lock it in place. I "survived" with this setup for about 8 years before I bought a lift for that same router. I didn't know I was handicapped until I read it one one of these forums .It really didn't make any difference in the output of my work, just made it a little more convenient to do it.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
I don't know about the 5625 but my Freud has the collet lock as well as the flats on the collet nut accessible from above the table when it is fully raised. I don't need to go through any of the gyrations depicted here. I just wind it up to the top, I use a internal hex socket and automotive speed wrench, move the speed wrench to the collet lock and then remove and replace the bit. :smile:
 

·
Master firewood maker
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
I made my router table to accept plates made from 1/2" ply. The plates fit perfectly in the top because they are the same ply as the top layer of the table, which I made by laminating 1/2" ply onto 3/4" ply. So my plates are very cheap.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top