Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I'm looking to buy a router so I don't always have to borrow my bosses and I'm just wondering what the uses for a 2 1/4 horsepower and 3 1/4 horsepower are. What's the difference aside from power? Can somebody explain the different uses? Thanks.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
The only reason you'd ever need a 3 1/4 hp router is if your turning big bits, like panel raising bits. They help if your working with alot of hard materials as well....but often its better to take multiple passes instead of trying to do it all in one pass anyhow.

You don't need to break the bank to get a good router.....here's one I have two of.....for 145 bucks you get a 2.5 hp with both a plunge and fixed base. Its 159 right now.....but every other week or so its on sale for 145......here's an example of a rock solid craftsman tool that still is a great quality piece....for a pretty good price.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-14-a...blockNo=2&blockType=G2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Interesting side note.......on rockler.com they published an article from woodworkers journal editor Rob Johnson praising this router....and they don't even sell it......got a good chuckle out of that one....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
More power equals heavier, so big routers are best suited for use in a router table where the weight isn't cumbersome to the user...they're particularly adept at spinning bigger bits with ease...excellent for raised panels, etc. Variable speed is a must when spinning big bits. Smaller routers are more conducive to hand use, but are also capable of some table use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
It has to take 1/4" and 1/2" shanks, It has to have variable speed, and must be a plunge router with the smoothest action possible. I am usually the first to suggest avoiding craftsman but they have a digital router with slow start and a digital selector for speed that can be set directly or will be set automatically judging by the bit size and material being cut. It was the first tool I bought and it has served me well although I haven`t used any raised panel bits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
The only reason you'd ever need a 3 1/4 hp router is if your turning big bits, like panel raising bits. They help if your working with alot of hard materials as well....but often its better to take multiple passes instead of trying to do it all in one pass anyhow.
I have the 2.25 hp bosch combo. Over the summer I bought a 1 3/4 inch amana flute bit for the purpose of surfacing a cedar slab. Does that router have enough power to effectively turn that bit or is 1 3/4 inch not considered a big bit. Obviously I have little router experience and don't know much about raised panel bits. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
The only reason you'd ever need a 3 1/4 hp router is if your turning big bits, like panel raising bits. They help if your working with alot of hard materials as well....but often its better to take multiple passes instead of trying to do it all in one pass anyhow.

You don't need to break the bank to get a good router.....here's one I have two of.....for 145 bucks you get a 2.5 hp with both a plunge and fixed base. Its 159 right now.....but every other week or so its on sale for 145......here's an example of a rock solid craftsman tool that still is a great quality piece....for a pretty good price.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-14-a...blockNo=2&blockType=G2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2
I also own a pair of these routers and find them to be more than adequate for anything I do including raised panels. I keep one mounter in a table and the other I use for hand routing and/or plunge cuts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
I have the 2.25 hp bosch combo. Over the summer I bought a 1 3/4 inch amana flute bit for the purpose of surfacing a cedar slab. Does that router have enough power to effectively turn that bit or is 1 3/4 inch not considered a big bit. Obviously I have little router experience and don't know much about raised panel bits. Thank you.
Yes. Many of the better "smaller" routers (10-12 amps) have enough power to spin even a 3-1/2" panel raising bit if you take small bites and don't run those bits on a daily basis for hours on end. The bigger motors will always have an easier time with the same bit, which is better for the longevity of the motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the replys guys. I think I'm gonna go with the craftsman ryan suggested. hopefully pick it up in 2 weeks when the paycheck arrives.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Just an FYI....most sears stores don't carry it in stock anymore so you have to order it....it's usually cheaper online than in store
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ryan50hrl said:
Just an FYI....most sears stores don't carry it in stock anymore so you have to order it....it's usually cheaper online than in store
My Peoria store stocks it. I had actually already seen it and really liked it
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Good to hear they still are. A number of stores stopped carrying it late last year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I use a PC 7518 with a 3.25 hp motor in my router table. I run a lot of hardwood thru it and generally don't take big bites with one pass, but the extra power gives me the confidence to know it wont bog down and ruin a piece I have spent hours on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I forgot to post this but I got a router. Was planning on the craftsman but manged to snag this bosch on eBay for $120. It's a beautiful machine.

Random orbital sander Machine Tool Angle grinder Sander
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top