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Discussion Starter #1

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The Triton routers are designed to be used as a lift themselves. I dont believe they can be disassembled and mounted in an aftermarket lift.

I just went through this and did a tons of reading and decision making. My orginal plan was to go with the big Triton TRA 001 mounted to a Woodpeckers plate. I think that would be a great combo but your still at the mercy of a built in lift in the router base. That may be fine untill you do the math on the other combo. I wound up going with the JessEm Rout R Lift and the Craftsman Pro router that Ryan mentioned, I believe the numbers are 27680. Anyhow, its a well regarded router with 2.5HP and it will be in a real lift! The Triton package I mentioned is just shy of $400. The JessEm/Craftsman combo is about $20 less. This includes the optional set of insert rings for the lift.

I havnt actually used this combo as my table isnt built and UPS just delivered my lift about 5 minutes ago but I think it will be a great combo that should satisfy my routing needs for many years to come!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
You didn't want to use the Triton, because you didn't feel comfortable relying on the built-in lift mechanism. Do I understand your post correctly?
You prefer a "real" lift, because it's more reliable?

Thanks.


The Triton routers are designed to be used as a lift themselves. I dont believe they can be disassembled and mounted in an aftermarket lift.

I just went through this and did a tons of reading and decision making. My orginal plan was to go with the big Triton TRA 001 mounted to a Woodpeckers plate. I think that would be a great combo but you're still at the mercy of a built in lift in the router base. That may be fine untill you do the math on the other combo. I wound up going with the JessEm Rout R Lift and the Craftsman Pro router that Ryan mentioned, I believe the numbers are 27680. Anyhow, its a well regarded router with 2.5HP and it will be in a real lift! The Triton package I mentioned is just shy of $400. The JessEm/Craftsman combo is about $20 less. This includes the optional set of insert rings for the lift.

I havnt actually used this combo as my table isnt built and UPS just delivered my lift about 5 minutes ago but I think it will be a great combo that should satisfy my routing needs for many years to come!
 

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I didnt go with the Triton because after much thought it just didnt make since. Yeah it has a lift built in but can a router with a base designed for above table adjustments be as good as a lift designed for this purpose? That and your still forced to go under the table for several things. The Triton is designed to lock the collet itself when the router is cranked all the way up but it has a safety mechanism built in that wont let it lock if the switch is turned on. Typically when a router is mounted in a table, you plug it in to an auxillary switch and leave the router switched on. The idea behind a lift is that everything is done without going under the table and its all done very precisely. You definately cant use the Triton without going under the table and I highly doubt it can make adjustments as precise as a purpose built lift. Then you still need to either make or buy a plate. The Triton router is a beast and is very heavy so it requires an aluminum plate. The best I can tell, Incra and Woodpeckers are the only ones making an aluminum plate drilled to fit the big Triton. Both of those plates are 100 bucks. Now your router is up to 350 and you still need inserts for the plate. Add another $40. Im not trying to steer you away from the Triton. As I said, I think it would be a great router. It just didnt add up for me.

Heres the math...

Triton TRA 001 $249.00
Woodpecker Plate $99.99
Woodpecker Inserts $39.99
Total $389.97


JessEm Rout R Lift $179.99
Craftsman Pro 27680 $149.99
JessEm Inserts $34.99
Total $364.97

The difference is $25 and 3/4HP

The Craftsman Pro comes with both bases so you have fixed and plunge capabilities out of the table just like the Triton.
 

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John
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Which router should I get, for use in a lift? I was considering the Triton (TRA001), but I read that a lift for this router uses the fine adjustment; they said it's bad to use this excessively.

http://forums.finewoodworking.com/fine-woodworking-knots/ask-john-white/router-lift-needed-triton



I don't like the PC 7518, because it requires two wrenches to change the bit.

Any suggestions? Thanks.
Hi - Not sure how you can get around the two wrench system with a lift. Somehow you need to activate a spindle lock of some sort to change bits.
The Triton automatically locks the spindle when raised to the highest position. However, it is also mechanically locked out of reaching that position if the power switch is in the on position. I also don't know why it was reported that using the fine adjustment is bad for the router unless it is an old report. The early Tritons used a plastic follower which had a tendency to break but that particular flaw was corrected with a steel follower some years ago.
Bosch 1617 and MR23's both have fixed bases adaptable to above table adjustments but I don't know that they can lock the spindle from above the table. I know the MRP 23 doesn't because I do have that router.
I use the Freud 3000 in my table and I can do bit height adjustments and spindle lock from topside. I do need to go under the table to adjust speed and lock the height. I left the springs in the plunge base so I seldom bother to lock the height in. :smile:
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all of the info, mate.

Hi - Not sure how you can get around the two wrench system with a lift. Somehow you need to activate a spindle lock of some sort to change bits.
The Triton automatically locks the spindle when raised to the highest position. However, it is also mechanically locked out of reaching that position if the power switch is in the on position. I also don't know why it was reported that using the fine adjustment is bad for the router unless it is an old report. The early Tritons used a plastic follower which had a tendency to break but that particular flaw was corrected with a steel follower some years ago.
Bosch 1617 and MR23's both have fixed bases adaptable to above table adjustments but I don't know that they can lock the spindle from above the table. I know the MRP 23 doesn't because I do have that router.
I use the Freud 3000 in my table and I can do bit height adjustments and spindle lock from topside. I do need to go under the table to adjust speed and lock the height. I left the springs in the plunge base so I seldom bother to lock the height in. :smile:
Good Luck
 

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where's my table saw?
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I use 2 offset wrenches

http://www.ptreeusa.com/routerAcc.htm#2887

This site has a number of very handy accessories for your router table and router. I bought 2 of the offset wrenches and they make changing bit a snap. I use a Jessem Mart R Lift II with a Porter Cable 7518 route in a Bench Dog Pro cast iron table saw extension with great precision and power. It's rather pricey for the whole package but I love it. That router stays in the table, it's large and heavy, so I mostly use a PC 690 for hand held operations. Routers are a lot like hammers... there is one for every situation. :yes:
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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I have two router tables, both with lifts and both with the PC 7518 router motor installed.

The PC 7518 is the workhorse of the industry. The motor is used in many CNC applications and a good solid performer. A lot of the one/two wrench issues can be solved with the appropriate router lift.

The lifts are the old Woodpecker PRL-1 and the new version of the Woodpecker PRL-2. (I think that PRL means Precision Router Lift. Maybe it should be Perfect Router Lift? ;))

The router in the PRL-1 uses an "Eliminator" instead of chuck. (Single 5/32" Allen wrench to change bits. About $70, I think.) Very convenient but still a lot of cranking to raise and lower. Ten or twelve years ago this was the only way to go. (I think that this model is no longer available. )

The Eliminator.
The Eliminator RC Quick Change Chuck - Amazon.com


The router in the PRL-2 lift (It has a quick raise and lower mechanism with a fine adjustment.) uses the normal two wrench system. The quick raise and lower system brings the collet nuts up to table height and the two wrench system is more convenient even than the Eliminator system.

Bits can be changed without lifting the router out of the table with either system.

In operational preference, I'll use the two wrench system rather than the Eliminator. (There is no cranking involved.) Also I'm not reaching around trying to find the locking wrench or holding the locking button. IMHO there is not a better router lift on the market than the Woodpecker PRL-2. And I have no financial interest in Woodpeckers. It's just that once you use the Woodpecker router lift, it is a WOW.

Precision Router Lift
http://www.woodpeck.com/prlv2.html
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Very nice, rrich - thanks.
Is there a table that you suggest to go with that? Woodnthings suggested one, but it won't work well for my table saw.
 

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John
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I have this stupid table, so I guess I'd have to get a new one; the insert size doesn't match.
The Triton should work on this table(?), but I agree with you that reaching under the table to hit the power switch is a pain.

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/tabletop.html
I've got that table, only mine has the fold up legs so it gets the portable duty. I run a Freud 1700 in it but haven't used the above table functions on it. When it's on a bench or table, the router is hanging right out there and it's easier to do from the bottom.:smile:
 

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I don't like the PC 7518, because it requires two wrenches to change the bit.

Any suggestions? Thanks.
I preferred the spindle lock on my old Freud to the two wrenches on my new Milwaukee, but the new lift works so much better that it is well worth it.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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Very nice, rrich - thanks.
Is there a table that you suggest to go with that? Woodnthings suggested one, but it won't work well for my table saw.
I think that the lift is 9-1/4 by 11-3/4. So any side wing for your table saw with a hole that size will work. IIRC, the router plates are available in a large size (above) and a smaller one. The smaller ones are intended for the lower HP routers. (PC 690 ? ? ? )

There is no reason that you can't build yourself a router table.
 

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I have the Triton MOF001 router and tried to use it in a table as it's own lift. It just proved to be too much of a pain for me and I got the Incra Mast-R-Lift II and a PC 7518 setup. I absolutely love this combination and I highly recommend it. As far as using 2 wrenches for bit changes, I don't understand your objection, it's no big deal and is easy to do. The Triton is a good router and I now use it for hand work, where it does a great job.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I think that the lift is 9-1/4 by 11-3/4. So any side wing for your table saw with a hole that size will work. IIRC, the router plates are available in a large size (above) and a smaller one. The smaller ones are intended for the lower HP routers. (PC 690 ? ? ? )

There is no reason that you can't build yourself a router table.

The table I have now is that MLCS, and it has a nice white finish on it that seems to slide well. I think it's phenolic?
How do I make a table, and then finish it the way they did? :yes:

I didn't find a good answer with my google search.



And as mentioned earlier, I can't attach it to my table saw.
 

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The table I have now is that MLCS, and it has a nice white finish on it that seems to slide well. I think it's phenolic?
How do I make a table, and then finish it the way they did? :yes:

I didn't find a good answer with my google search.



And as mentioned earlier, I can't attach it to my table saw.
You just glue a piece of plastic laminate to the top or you make your top with melamine. Im making mine with laminate. Probably gonna go with a white Formica unless I can find something a little cheaper local.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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I made my table top with two pieces of 3/4" Baltic Birch glued together with TiteBond II. I put a lot of screws through the top to hold the two pieces together while the glue dried. Then I removed the screws after the glue dried.

I think the brand of HPL (High Pressure Laminate, a.k.a. Formica) that I used was Nevamar. It's been a few years and I got it from HD but that is another story. If people ask for it, I will post it here.

Any HPL can be used and attached with contact cement. Then a router with a trim bit to trim the edges to the plywood.

To cut the hole for the lift, first make a frame that fits around the plate of the lift. Make the frame with 1/32" clearance. Put this on your HPL table top with double side tape. Mark with a pencil around the inside using a 3/4" spacer to drawer the line. The result is a line smaller than the frame by 3/4" on all sides.

With a router and template bit, route a dado / rabbet / groove against the frame. Use a scrap from the frame material with double side tape attached to the router as a stabilizing foot on the router. Make this dado about 1/32" deeper than the thickness of your lift plate.

The result is a groove that the lift would fit into, if the center was removed. Use a sabre saw to cut out the center piece from the table top.

Fit the perimeter of the lift plate to the hole. Don't worry about the depth right now.

You'll need 8 to 12 #6 x 1" BRASS flat head screws with slotted drive to fit the plate to depth. First extend all the set screws in the plate so that they are beyond the bottom of the plate. Put the lift into the hole and press firmly over each set screw. This should make some dimples where the set screws are.

In each dimple drill a pilot hole and counter sink each hole. Install the brass screws in each hole just barely below the surface. Put the lift plate in the hole and level it using the set screws. The brass screws provide a softer than steel but firm surface to adjust the plate height. The slotted screw is less likely to try to "move" the plate like a Philips might do.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
You just glue a piece of plastic laminate to the top or you make your top with melamine. Im making mine with laminate. Probably gonna go with a white Formica unless I can find something a little cheaper local.
Ah, that doesn't sound too hard. Thanks!
 
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