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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I've never used router bushings but it seems like they'd be very helpful so I started looking into it and I believe I need a base with a threaded center hole and that center hole will accept bushings (with matching size/threads). Can anyone confirm that this is correct and that's all I need? Also, does anyone know of a base for the dewalt dcw600b that they could reference? I believe the one I've listed below (and a couple others I've found) will fit but my model/series isn't listed as being compatible so I thought I'd check with you all.


Thanks,
 

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I've never used router bushings but it seems like they'd be very helpful so I started looking into it and I believe I need a base with a threaded center hole and that center hole will accept bushings (with matching size/threads). Can anyone confirm that this is correct and that's all I need? Also, does anyone know of a base for the dewalt dcw600b that they could reference?
The versatility and adaptability of routers can make them confusing, and in a case like this there are 2 or 3 manufactures involved.

First the bushings. I highly recommend going with the Porter Cable standard bushings, they don't need to be made by PC, just compatible with. The bushing has a flange, it fits into a hole in the router base, the base has a rabbit for the flange to fit into. Then a threaded ring that comes with the bushings screws onto the top of the bushing. The router base is not threaded. I have and like this set of bushings:

My routers are mid size DeWalts, they come with bases ready for PC bushings. It is unclear to me if your compact dcw600b comes with a compatible base. I think the base you linked to is for midsize routers, it lists DeWALT (DW621, DW616 series, DW625, DW618), I think that means your router isn't included. This base should work, and to me the handles would be a big plus for stability and ease of handling:

But do you have a plunge base for your router? Most of the time that I use bushings it is with a plunge base, maybe other forum members can say what they think of using bushings with a fixed base. DeWalt does make a plunge base for their compact routers, selling for about $75 to $120, but seems it is out of stock most places now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Bob,

Thank you very much for the info, this cleared up a lot for me. I've been wanting to get a plunge base for my router, but like you said, they're hard to come by. I think there are a few places where I can still get one but I haven't had a good excuse to spend that much money. I didn't think a plunge base would be necessary until you mentioned asking others though.

Does anyone know if there's a reason bushings wouldn't work with a fixed base?
 

· where's my table saw?
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Hello all,

I've never used router bushings but it seems like they'd be very helpful so I started looking into it and I believe I need a base with a threaded center hole and that center hole will accept bushings (with matching size/threads). Can anyone confirm that this is correct and that's all I need? Also, does anyone know of a base for the dewalt dcw600b that they could reference? I believe the one I've listed below (and a couple others I've found) will fit but my model/series isn't listed as being compatible so I thought I'd check with you all.

Thanks,
No need for a threaded hole!
The hole must have a recess for the end of the bushing which is "T" shaped so it can pull out.
Like these:
The bushings have a center "T" shaped profile that has their own threads which get tightened down from above the base with a knurled ring.
The main issue with bushing is the must be larger than the bit itself with some clearance around the bit.
This means there will be "MATH" needed to compensate in the template for that dimension!
Flush trim router bits have taken over for the bushings to a large degree, because there is no MATH required!
 

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Flush trim router bits have taken over for the bushings to a large degree, because there is no MATH required!
Good point, guide bushings and bearing bits overlap each other in what they can do, sometimes you have to use one or the other, sometimes it is a matter of what you have and personal preference. I like and use both methods.

Josh, please tell us what kind of router projects you like to do and hope to do in the next few years. Hard to recommend router stuff without knowing the goal.
 

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I've been wanting to get a plunge base for my router, but like you said, they're hard to come by. I think there are a few places where I can still get one but I haven't had a good excuse to spend that much money.
Maybe this isn't right for you, but I'll throw it out there. Instead of spending around $100 on a plunge base for your compact DeWalt get a midsize router kit that has both fixed and plunge bases.

Advantages:
With 2 routers one can be set up for one thing, the other router for another, really nice for some projects.
Mid size routers can use both 1/4" and 1/2" shank bits, some bits are only 1/2", when both are available I get the 1/2".
I'm biased to midsize, to me they feel more stable and the handles safer. Lots of experienced people love compacts, just not my preference.
Mid size is what is commonly used in router tables, if you get one of those.
Get a corded one, safe the expense and hassle of batteries.

Cons:
It is a big price jump from where you started the thread. It goes back to what projects you want to do, what tools you need to get there.
 

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The DEWALT DNP613 Round Sub Base is clear for better visibility to the work area. It is made from durable lexan. The round base accepts template guides and allows user to get into tight areas. This "may" fit
Good find, it says it fits the DCW600, best price so far, and is in stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Good point, guide bushings and bearing bits overlap each other in what they can do, sometimes you have to use one or the other, sometimes it is a matter of what you have and personal preference. I like and use both methods.

Josh, please tell us what kind of router projects you like to do and hope to do in the next few years. Hard to recommend router stuff without knowing the goal.
What I'm wanting to use this for is making nice round flat bottomed holes (without a hole in the center from a forstner bit) and bowtie inlays. I hadn't even thought about bearing bits for some reason. However, a bearing bit would require a lot of extra setup with the template to get the appropriate depth so I think the bushing route is still the better route.

Thanks to all who responded for your input and suggestions. Unless a plunge router is needed for the bushing/template setup then I think I'm all set at this point. I'll definitely get a plunge base or a plunge router at some point though!
 

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What I'm wanting to use this for is making nice round flat bottomed holes (without a hole in the center from a forstner bit) and bowtie inlays.
Yep, for inlays bushings are the way to go. You've seen the inlay-specific bushing kits? The bushing kit I linked to is a general purpose one.

For the holes you are talking about I'd go with a plunge base. What diameters are you thinking of?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yep, for inlays bushings are the way to go. You've seen the inlay-specific bushing kits? The bushing kit I linked to is a general purpose one.

For the holes you are talking about I'd go with a plunge base. What diameters are you thinking of?
One of the flat bottomed holes I’ll be making will be 1 3/4 in diameter, another will be around 3, and who knows what else in the future. I would want a plunge base as well but I figure I’ll just use a drill bit to get close to the right depth and remove the material at that depth the slowly go in at an angle with the router to get the last little bit. Typing that out does sound a lot more stupid than it’s felt when I’ve done it in the past haha. I guess that’s a good enough excuse to go splurge on the plunge base.
 

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Hi Bob,

Thank you very much for the info, this cleared up a lot for me. I've been wanting to get a plunge base for my router, but like you said, they're hard to come by. I think there are a few places where I can still get one but I haven't had a good excuse to spend that much money. I didn't think a plunge base would be necessary until you mentioned asking others though.

Does anyone know if there's a reason bushings wouldn't work with a fixed base?
Yes on the PC bushings. I use them with both a plunge base and standard base, depends on the operation. Anytime I am using the router hand held and the bit I am using does not have a bearing, I use a bushing. I also use fixed bases and bushings for operations such as cutting dovetails. On thing I have started doing is I picked up a bunch of thin rubber rings that I put over the bushing before screwing the washer ring down. With the vibration in routers it is not uncommon for the bushing to loosen up. I small rubber ring prevents that.
 

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I just bought a set of router bushings from Rockler and I'll point out one great benefit of their set. It comes with centering bits that go in the router collette and help you to set up and center the base/bushing. Then you remove the centering bit and insert your router bit an you know it's centered and correct.

None of the el-cheapo sets on Amazon or eBay had these extra two tools so I spent a few extra $$ and got the Rockler set.

 

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I just bought a set of router bushings from Rockler and I'll point out one great benefit of their set. It comes with centering bits that go in the router collette and help you to set up and center the base/bushing. Then you remove the centering bit and insert your router bit an you know it's centered and correct.

None of the el-cheapo sets on Amazon or eBay had these extra two tools so I spent a few extra $$ and got the Rockler set.

Some router plates are not adjustable and a centering pin will not help. In this case if the plate isn't correctly centered you have to buy a new plate. At the time I purchased one from Pat Warner.
 

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I just bought a set of router bushings from Rockler and I'll point out one great benefit of their set. It comes with centering bits that go in the router collette and help you to set up and center the base/bushing. Then you remove the centering bit and insert your router bit an you know it's centered and correct.
The general use bushing sets (not an inlay kit) come with a 1/4" inside diameter bushing and one that's 1/2" ID. With a spiral bit that size you can center your base plate, it works for me. I give the bit a few turns by finger on the collet.

Also some routers like the midsize DeWalts come with a centering cone. Bushings aren't the only time to center your base, you can use the outer edge of your base along a straight edge etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I just bought a set of router bushings from Rockler and I'll point out one great benefit of their set. It comes with centering bits that go in the router collette and help you to set up and center the base/bushing. Then you remove the centering bit and insert your router bit an you know it's centered and correct.

None of the el-cheapo sets on Amazon or eBay had these extra two tools so I spent a few extra $$ and got the Rockler set.

I did not know this before ordering the bushing set so of course I got a cheap-o one from amazon without a centering bit/cone. I'm thinking I can just turn a centering bit/cone out of a hardwood. Any reason this is a bad idea?
 

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I did not know this before ordering the bushing set so of course I got a cheap-o one from amazon without a centering bit/cone. I'm thinking I can just turn a centering bit/cone out of a hardwood. Any reason this is a bad idea?
Jay is talking about a general use bushing set. You are getting an inlay bushing kit? Please post the make and model of your kit. Do you have it yet? The instructions might recommend a centering method.

I'm not a turner. Seems like the tricky part of making a centering cone from wood is that the shank needs to be precise. Maybe: take an ordinary 1/4" drill bit, double check that it fits your collet well, epoxy it into the end of a piece of wood, then turn it into a cone. But that means holding a piece of metal 1/4" by an inch or 2 long in your lathe chuck and turning the cone; the cutting tool would be hitting the chuck? Get a 1/4" rod long enough to go all the way though the wood so you can turn the cone away from the chuck?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Jay is talking about a general use bushing set. You are getting an inlay bushing kit? Please post the make and model of your kit. Do you have it yet? The instructions might recommend a centering method.

I'm not a turner. Seems like the tricky part of making a centering cone from wood is that the shank needs to be precise. Maybe: take an ordinary 1/4" drill bit, double check that it fits your collet well, epoxy it into the end of a piece of wood, then turn it into a cone. But that means holding a piece of metal 1/4" by an inch or 2 long in your lathe chuck and turning the cone; the cutting tool would be hitting the chuck? Get a 1/4" rod long enough to go all the way though the wood so you can turn the cone away from the chuck?
Hi Bob, the link below is what I ordered (and received). It's a general bushing set and it did not come with any instructions. As far as being precise is concerned, I can usually get a diameter to within .05 mm of my goal dimensions which I would expect to be good enough for the router collet to hold it but if it really needs to be perfect, I'm sure I could get it just right with a few attempts.

 
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