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I really appreciate all of the answers I get from all of you guys to my questions. Well here is another query of mine. The question I have is about the router round over bit. How do you know which one to use on X size stock. The smallest stuff I work with is 1/4" and the largest being 3/4" thickness that is. I may be able to answer my own question but read on. I'm looking in the Rockler catalog at the round over bits and they have several different Radius Height Shank. I get the shank part thats what goes inside of the router but the height and Radius kinda have me a little confused. Say I want to put a round over edge on a 3/4" piece of Red Oak. Should I go with the 3/8" height bit or the 3/4" one? I've never really used a router before but like once or twice to mortise for a hinge or two. I've always used my belt sander to put a round edge on my stuff. Sorry for the long read.
 

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If your routing a round over in say 3/4" stock you want a 3/8" if you want the radius to stop half way thru the 3/4" thickness.
If you want the radius to end at the bottom edge of the stock you want a 3/4" bit. But just a word of caution, you may not want to hog that much stock in one pass. Adjust your bit so you take it in two or more passes. Some of the larger diameter bits should only be used in a router table and not in a hand held router.
 

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1/8" roundovers will just "ease" the edge... it'll get rid of the sharp edge of the board and save you a bit of sanding, no matter what the stock's thickness is. As you go larger, more wood is removed and the side profile of the board becomes, obviously, more rounded over.

Depth of cut also influences what the finished product looks like.

IMO, It's something you really have to experiment with in order to fully see what they do. Go to town on some scrap wood to discover each bit's abilities... then you'll be able to easily decide which bit to use for the job at hand.
 
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