Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am making a few cabinet doors for my shop storage I am using 3/4 ply I used a 1/2 roundover bit however am not happy with the look. My router will only take a 1/4 shank , is the 1/2" the biggest bit I can get for my router ? or do I have to get a router with a 1/2 shank that is even if they make a bigger rounder bit sorry for the stupid question just need help.

Thanks Bruce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
I am making a few cabinet doors for my shop storage I am using 3/4 ply I used a 1/2 roundover bit however am not happy with the look. My router will only take a 1/4 shank , is the 1/2" the biggest bit I can get for my router ? or do I have to get a router with a 1/2 shank that is even if they make a bigger rounder bit sorry for the stupid question just need help.

Thanks Bruce.
Bruce, you're using a roundover bit on plywood? I don't think you will ever be happy with it unless you glue a solid wood edging around the ply, then roundover the solid wood.

A 1/4" shank 1/2" roundover will work just fine... you can even get a 3/4" roundover with a 1/4" shank that should work pretty good.

Of course, a 1/2" shank will give you better performance on the larger diameter bits... but, I think you can do it with a 1/4" shank bit.

Check Rockler, Woodcraft, & MLSC for Sales.

Just IMHO...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Bruce, you're using a roundover bit on plywood? I don't think you will ever be happy with it unless you glue a solid wood edging around the ply, then roundover the solid wood.

A 1/4" shank 1/2" roundover will work just fine... you can even get a 3/4" roundover with a 1/4" shank that should work pretty good.

Of course, a 1/2" shank will give you better performance on the larger diameter bits... but, I think you can do it with a 1/4" shank bit.

Check Rockler, Woodcraft, & MLSC for Sales.

Just IMHO...
Joe.
Thanks for you reply I will try that.
Bruce.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,027 Posts
Bruce

I doubt that you will find a roundover bit with a bearing that is larger than 1/2" that would have a 1/4" shank. If you do, I wouldn't recommend using it. That's a lot of twisting steel and carbide.

With a 1/2" bit you will have about 1/4" or less of flat left under the profile. You may need that to have the bearing something to run on. If you choose to use a 3/4" bit, there will be no flat. The radius will taper right to a feathered edge on a full 3/4" piece. If you do want that look, clamp a straight edge under the stock (for hand routing) to give the bearing a guiding edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
As you get into using your router, you will discover why 1/2 inch shank bits came along. They are of course, less prone to flex under pressure, and produce a better finish....since they don't tend to "vibrate" at the super high speeds of a router, where a 1/4 inch shank bit can leave the slightest "chatter" marks on a piece. This can be caused by other things, especially technique, but the 1/2 shank bits help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
As you get into using your router, you will discover why 1/2 inch shank bits came along. They are of course, less prone to flex under pressure, and produce a better finish....since they don't tend to "vibrate" at the super high speeds of a router, where a 1/4 inch shank bit can leave the slightest "chatter" marks on a piece. This can be caused by other things, especially technique, but the 1/2 shank bits help.
Your right 1/2'' and alot safer to thanks.

Bruce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Bruce

I doubt that you will find a roundover bit with a bearing that is larger than 1/2" that would have a 1/4" shank. If you do, I wouldn't recommend using it. That's a lot of twisting steel and carbide.

With a 1/2" bit you will have about 1/4" or less of flat left under the profile. You may need that to have the bearing something to run on. If you choose to use a 3/4" bit, there will be no flat. The radius will taper right to a feathered edge on a full 3/4" piece. If you do want that look, clamp a straight edge under the stock (for hand routing) to give the bearing a guiding edge.
Your right got the Ryobi 1/4'' on sale I will get the 1/2'' thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
Your right got the Ryobi 1/4'' on sale I will get the 1/2'' thanks
Ryobi offers a fixed-base and plunge router in a package, and the swapable motor assembly handles 1/2 inch bits. They also have a dedicated plunge router that handles bits with that collet diameter.

Note that some Sears Craftsman units appear to be similar to those Ryobi models, with the advantage of having the on/off switch in the handle instead of on the motor body. This is a convenience advantage.

There are no doubt better routers than those Ryobi units, but the differences are probably minor. Bit quality is more important, I should think.

Howard Ferstler
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Ryobi offers a fixed-base and plunge router in a package, and the swapable motor assembly handles 1/2 inch bits. They also have a dedicated plunge router that handles bits with that collet diameter.

Note that some Sears Craftsman units appear to be similar to those Ryobi models, with the advantage of having the on/off switch in the handle instead of on the motor body. This is a convenience advantage.

There are no doubt better routers than those Ryobi units, but the differences are probably minor. Bit quality is more important, I should think.

Howard Ferstler
Howard.
Thanks for the info.

Bruce.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top