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I'm making a round table top, which is easy enough with a bandsaw. However, I want to make an outer, decorative 3" border made out of a different wood. What is the best way to do this? I've looked online and can't find anything beyond making the basic round table.

My current thinking is to build an octagonal frame and cut the circular border with a router. The measurement will have to be very precise to fit perfectly around the outer curve of the table, though.

Is there a better way - maybe fitting the border piece by piece instead of as an intact circle?
 

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Keep in mind that if you plan to use solid wood, you must design and build your table in a manner that will allow the wood to freely expand and contract with changes in it's moisture content. A solid panel is fine but an outer rim would end up being a cross grain situation in some places. When the center moves, the rim will be trying to restrict it. Something will have to give.

Tables with rims should be built using composition materials like MDF or plywood. These materials will not expand and contract. Then apply a veneer. Then create your rim with another veneer. As long as the veneer is less than an 1/8th" there will be no problems.
 

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Wow - I hadn't even thought of that. Thanks. I'm a bit of a novice - most of my experience comes from woodturning, and haven't done a project like this before.

Thanks, again.
 

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Old School
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I'm making a round table top, which is easy enough with a bandsaw. However, I want to make an outer, decorative 3" border made out of a different wood. What is the best way to do this? I've looked online and can't find anything beyond making the basic round table.

My current thinking is to build an octagonal frame and cut the circular border with a router. The measurement will have to be very precise to fit perfectly around the outer curve of the table, though.

Is there a better way - maybe fitting the border piece by piece instead of as an intact circle?
You can cut your stock from solid wood if your stock is wide enough. Or better yet do glued up laminations. I've not had a problem with expansion and contraction.
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bzguy
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:smile: Nice work Cabinetman, really top shelf.
I also had a shop in south Florida for 15 years.
I would agree with having no problems with expansion if in south Florida.
Everyone, from trailer parks to people who would order cabinetry of this quality have air conditioning there, keeping the environment dry and stable.
However if you were to put this same unit in say New England it may not fair so well.
People there welcome the moist spring and summer with open windows.
Then they heat with wood and oil, drying everything out again for 8-9 months a year.
So depending on where this table winds up, it could be an issue.
If i were to "wrap" this with a 3" edge, I would do it with thin laminated strips which would be much less likely to separate since there is continuous tensile strength and only one joint.
It can be profiled all at once to any shape desired.
 
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