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oregoncarver
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Discussion Starter #1
Just purchased the Rockler Carbide tip turning tool, cuts very fast, almost to fast, any suggestions on how to use it?

Arthur
 

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I was looking at this tool too, please let us know if you give it a yea or nay. It seems reasonably priced compared to the competition, but that's not always a good thing. Do you present it level or shear cut with it?
 

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I personally had some problems with it at first because it was just taking off too much at one time, but then played with it a little more and it worked out really great. Just make sure that you are not holding the tool flat to the wood, make sure it is at least 45 or more. The greater the angle I held the tool to the wood the less it would take off. Otherwise it worked out really great. Turned many bowls now and can almost finish the entire bowl without switching tools and then having limited sanding afterwards.
 

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Which Rockler model # did you buy?
What kind of wood are you turning?

Glad you like it
Pictures...pictures?????
 

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oregoncarver
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Discussion Starter #7
I got the replaceable tip one, extra tip came free with it for 59.99. I was using it level, I guess I'll try and hold it at an angle. thanks for all the input.

Arthur
 

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oregoncarver
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Discussion Starter #8
Tried the tool again yesterday and again today, still couldn't get the hang of it so went back to Rockler to see them about it. Sales person said to return it, they are having problems with it all over the place. So back to good old HSS tools.

Arthur
 

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That is weird why he told you to return it. I wonder why the Rockler tool does not work well, while you can get any other carbide replaceable tip tool and they will work fine. As I mentioned before it's working fine for myself, maybe mine is good?? But looked up some youtube videos and the link below shows the tool at work, so if you still have it then give this a try. Sorry to hear about your faulty purchase because it is a really good buy.

 

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Hey John
Do you like using these kind of tools better than HSS and a sharpening system?
I'm that Newbie that keeps lurking around here getting all different opinions before I dive into my investment of HSS gouges vs carbide.

Thanks
Tom
 

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Yea i got wood
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John your videos were a great help i hope
i bought my pool from harrison specialities and was really having trouble with the round one but after watching your video i think i might just have it now
Thanks again for all you help:thumbsup:
 

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The answer to your question is yes and no. I prefer HSS cutting tools for 90 percent of my work. I use the carbide tools for special purposes. I use the Hunter tools for finish work or when I can't get a clean enough cut with another tool i will try the Hunter. The reason is that I can cut out the waste and shape the bowl better with a regular gouge. I'll make the last pass with the Hunter tool if necessary.
The same is true with boxes. I will do 90 percent of the hollowing with bowl gouge or spindle gouge and then do the final pass or two with the Hunter tool.
Hollowing ornaments I do with the Hunter tool. It 's just faster.
Because of the steep bevel angle on the Hunter tool I will often use them to clean up the bottom of deep closed in bowls, or the bottom of vases. There isn't any tool better for that.
I'm not yet a fan of the flat carbide tools. I know people are using them but I can control the shape of the vessel so much better with a gouge and I can get cuts with no tearout. Scrapers, even carbide scrapers will not cut as clean a cutting tool.
 

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oregoncarver
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Discussion Starter #15
the sales person said he even got one and returned it and I have watched him do demos before so I know he knows what he is talking about. He things there is a design flaw in the tool cutter it self.
I returned it this afternoon.
Arthur
 

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I just watched the video up above. I find it interesting that he says the cut is almost perfect and yet there is a fair amount of tearout and fibers sticking up. That's not even close to what I would call perfect.
He is also using the tools as a scraper. By orienting the tool so the face of the tool is facing the wood you get a scraper action. Some times this is good. If you orient it correctly the front edge of the tool is acting like a shear scraper. The way he has the tool the bottom edge is doing the scraping so you will naturally get more tearout.
I prefer the round bar cutters like the Hunter tools because you can then rotate the tool to the best position for the kind of cut you want. It does have a learning curve to be able to find the optimum cutting angle but it's well worth it.
 

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Hi Oregoncarver,

Just read your post about a Rockler Carbide Tip tool.
Checking their web site and latest catalog.......can't find it listed.
Where did you find it ?
Any suggestions ?

Thanks,

Ang
 

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I can't believe Rockler used the photo showing the tool cutting with it flat. That's by far the best way to get a catch and the worst way to use that tool. I have helped in the design of a carbide tool that might be used somewhat like that. I have to keep mum on the true shape of it for now. It might change before it hits the market.
 

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I agree John
after watching your videos i realized what i was doing wrong
tilting the tool and following the bevel i did really great turning the inside of the spalted maple bowl i posted yesterday
 
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