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1948
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I have never been hurt by kick-back, but I have been hurt by "kick up". I like to fashion some sort of hold-down when ripping short pieces between the fence and the blade.
 

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I have never been hurt by kick-back, but I have been hurt by "kick up". I like to fashion some sort of hold-down when ripping short pieces between the fence and the blade.
that's the basic definition of kickback, the back of the blade catches the material and kicks the material up and back. weather it hits you in the face or the nuts, it's kickback
 

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1948
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I was making that distinction because I had supported it from behind to prevent kick "back". At which time it kicked Up. The point I was making was that on shorter pieces you have to control both the rearward movement and the upward movement. The image in the video at the beginning of this thread shows what I would consider risky practice if used for short lenghts and all these jigs are basicall designed for shorter lenghts. So kick up is the risk here whether you call it kick-back or kick-up. I would use a sacrificial pusher that rides behind and above the material to control in both directions.
 

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I wanting to also make the point. The first thing to make or purchase is a zero clearance insert for the table saw. That may have been mentioned before, but I didn’t see it.

Roger
 

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1948
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I find a zero clearance insert is useful for cross cuts, cuts on plywood, particleboard, etc, but of little value for ripping. And I’ve never heard it mitigates the risk of kickback. How would it be helpful for this operation?
 

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I find a zero clearance insert is useful for cross cuts, cuts on plywood, particleboard, etc, but of little value for ripping. And I’ve never heard it mitigates the risk of kickback. How would it be helpful for this operation?
Better support for the workpiece as the blade cuts it. For a very thin cut, less chance for the front of the blade to pull down on the workpiece and pinch it between the blade and the insert.

Besides, what harm does it do?
 

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where's my table saw?
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I find a zero clearance insert is useful for cross cuts, cuts on plywood, particleboard, etc, but of little value for ripping. And I’ve never heard it mitigates the risk of kickback. How would it be helpful for this operation?
It's always better than a larger gap around the blade! It will make cleaner cuts even with the grain, and especially will prevent thin strips from getting wedged down in between the blade. There is a natural tendency for the operator to reach for it before the blades comes to a complete stop! DAMHIKT! It does no harm and much good.
 
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1948
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I use zero clearance except for angle cuts. I simply did not understand the safety aspect. From a safety point of view the blade height shown in the video seems excessive. I think a blade height that goes beyond the gullets between the teeth is excessive.
 

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Egg Spurt
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Really simple jig dug up from the above link posted by ducbsa..
Basically uses a roller skate bearing on the edge of what amounts to a feather board..
 
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