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6-8' strips The person I have seen doing this and commented that it was not very safe (no push blocks etc.) told me he knew what he was doing and mind my own business.
Maybe he does. I have seen a lot of people do things 'the wrong way' but it works for them and they do know how to do it. Telling someone they are doing it wrong is a good way to told off too.
 

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YUP, for $180.00 and shipping you can get yours. You do get a free "ultra" thin kerf splitter worth $20.00 however.

OR, you can spend $20.00 more on Amazon, for $200.00:
Not gone do dat!!

8 1/4 won’t work with Saw Stop. Brake has to sense a blade or machine won’t run. Supposedly can be tricked with 8” blade and dado cartridge.

I also like the "cut 1/2 way and flip" method, particularly on a short table job site saw. Inboard or outboard makes little difference just a matter of preference if using the proper technique.
You don’t get kerf marks where they overlap? I can’t achieve that even on a cabinet saw. I suppose the right featherboard configuration might prevent it.

IMO you should always have an outfeed table. It makes any table saw much safer - keep you from leaning over the blade.
 

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Using a bandsaw is also an option. I normally do that and run them through the planer to get them really exact.
 

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The "workpiece" is the entire piece and has two parts, the "cutoff or waste" and the "final dimension or saved" part, at least that's how I've always referred to it.
I am sorry I confused you. The "work piece" is the piece of lumber, being used in the project. At least that's how I've always referred to it.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Me too, but if I needed 1/16" thick or even 1/8" thick strips, I think I would use a "thin rip jig". Pushing a really thin strip with anything other than a wide push block wouldn't work.
You might be able to use the workpiece as a "pusher" which would start the following strip in the procession.... I donno?
 

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Termite
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Me too, but if I needed 1/16" thick or even 1/8" thick strips, I think I would use a "thin rip jig". Pushing a really thin strip with anything other than a wide push block wouldn't work.
You might be able to use the workpiece as a "pusher" which would start the following strip in the procession.... I donno?
We eliminate the push stick with flipping..
 

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"I won't work around drugs, alcoholics or people who can't get along..."

You got that right. After I quit drinking I decided never again. I will not work with anyone who doesn't have their mind where it needs to be and won't work with or for jerks who make the day just drag along..

Back to strips. Inboard is easier to get the right thickness repeatedly, but also easier for things to jam up and cause issues where you have to turn the saw off in the middle of the cut.
As far as quality of cut I find it easier on the outside, but harder to gauge thickness..
Half dozen of one or six of the other..take your pick..
 

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I have ripped literally hundreds of 5/16 wide strips off a 60"long x 8/4 thick quarter sawn red oak blank.
always thin strip between blade and fence
always using a pusher block - hooked end, it drives right thru the entire cut.
yes, the pusher block gets cut up. it's scrap wood, make another.

using a thin push stick is imho very dangerous
the block keeps down pressure on the stock for the entire cut, sticks cannot replicate that.
I do have a number of pusher sticks for other circumstances.

after my first 'ah sh*t' moment with a plastic pusher stick, I threw them all away.
if a pusher block / stick inadvertently comes in contact with the blade, you want the saw blade to cleanly/easily slice through the block/stick - and not get gummed into plastic and throw the block/stick back at you at 100+/- mph.
 

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where's my table saw?
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BTDT myself. Never use plastic as a pusher or push stick because if it contacts the blade it turns to shrapnel. Those slender notched end push sticks are dangerous because they don't allow any down force on the workpiece except at the very beginning or starting end which is not enough.
 
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Have you tried it on a jobsite saw? The miter slots are farther from the blade than on other saws, too far for that thin rip jig to reach the blade and cut thin strips. The best you can do is ~1/2 inch "thin."
I use it on a 40 year old Craftsman table saw in the left miter slot, I can adjust the fixture to touch the blade. Once you set the fixture you need to readjust the fence for each cut.
 

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Pivoting back to blade guards (was that this thread?), I've been using my dust hood/blade guard a little. I can't rip anything less than 1" as there is no room between the guard and fence for that. So I was ripping 1" wide -- I can't use a push block (my preference), and was forced to use a push stick, and it was awkward at that, and I don't like the off cut not going all the way through, as it usually leaves a tab of wood.

Not meaning to start a debate, but someone made a comment on why you rarely ever see many seasoned people and pros use them. Perhaps its as simple as they make using the table saw more difficult?
 

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I was the one who asked about why it is rare to see blade guards used on table saws, especially seasoned people and pros (and on PBS and YouTube).

One difference is that as an unpaid amateur woodworker, I can trade time for safety. The seasoned pros have to make a living, so they must find a reasonable balance where cost considerations come into play.
 

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If I remember correctly my first table saw did not come with a guard, a tilting table model, later models I owned came with poorly designed guards so were soon discarded. I was very fortunate to never have had an accident considering there was the additional problem of very poor fences on many of those saws.

Today I use a guard as I am older and not as alert coupled with the fact that I am now more of an occasional user.

Several years ago I passed a Craftsman Contractor saw along to a young family friend, it did not come to me with a guard but I purchased one on Ebay and installed it before he picked it up.

Like most things in life we develop habits, looking back the habit of using a guard would have been a good thing, I was just lucky.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Pivoting back to blade guards (was that this thread?), I've been using my dust hood/blade guard a little. I can't rip anything less than 1" as there is no room between the guard and fence for that. So I was ripping 1" wide -- I can't use a push block (my preference), and was forced to use a push stick, and it was awkward at that, and I don't like the off cut not going all the way through, as it usually leaves a tab of wood.

Not meaning to start a debate, but someone made a comment on why you rarely ever see many seasoned people and pros use them. Perhaps its as simple as they make using the table saw more difficult?
If you follow my "rules" you can "get away" without a guard. But, not a splitter because serves a very important function, that is to maintain the slightest, lightest contact of the workpiece against the fence to prevent it from rotating away and causing a kickback. My old Craftsman splitters originally had those annoying plastic blade guards and anti-kickback pawls riveted on them, BUT I drilled out the rivets and removed that stuff and never looked back.

My rules:
Keep your hands and fingers out of the "red zone" of the throat plate insert.
Never place your hands in direct line with the blade's cutting path. ( This may not seem all that important when working with large panels, but get in the habit anyway)
Never reach around or behind a spinning blade, even one that's coasting to a stop. WHY? If you drop or loose your grip on the piece your natural inclination is to "catch" it, thereby putting your hands into the blade. Leave it on the outfeed table until you can safely retrieve it.
Do make an outfeed table for supporting long pieces and the shorter ones also. It is one of the most important safety accessories you can have for the table saw.
Make an extended fence for your miter gauge because it will push the cutoff and the workpiece past the blade simultaneously and safely.
Do not reach for small pieces in the "red zone" with your fingers. Use a pencil with a rubber eraser to "flick" them toward you where you can safely grab them.
Some production shops use a high pressure air nozzle to blast small parts into a safe zone.
The use of a splitter or riving knife will prevent 99% of all kickbacks and pinched blades from internal wood tensions.
Use a Safety Paddle switch mounted where you can bump the saw OFF with your hip/knee/leg in case of a bind where you ned both hands and both eyes on the blade and workpiece. Paddle Switch 120/230V at Grizzly.com
Do NOT use the slender, notched end push sticks which only allow forward pressure and a minimum of downward pressure.
Use a push block that's wider than your "saved" piece in between the blade and fence and cut right into it OR a push shoe that's long enough to also provide downward pressure will pushing the workpiece forward.
For some ripping operations, you should use an "L" fence attachment clamped to the OEM fence where you need or want a low profile fence. Unifences allow this feature.
Use a fence that locks securely at the front rail rather than a two point locking system, (both front and rear) that typically is not secure. (based on my experience)
I prefer and always have used a long, full length fence for the amount of registration it gives on long stock and panels. I would not use a "short fence".
60 + years of safe table saw operation gives me some "street creds" doncha think? o_O
 

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Termite
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I was the one who asked about why it is rare to see blade guards used on table saws, especially seasoned people and pros (and on PBS and YouTube).

One difference is that as an unpaid amateur woodworker, I can trade time for safety. The seasoned pros have to make a living, so they must find a reasonable balance where cost considerations come into play.
There removed for certain operations and just never put back on. Most shops couldnt tell you were they are. Most likely thrown away.

We had a Powermatic slider at the furniture company. Because of a few near misses we put the guard on. The operator didnt like it and removed it. It was put back on and then it all the sudden disappeared. Most likely trash.

Most professional are trained with the equipment available. If there use to it not being there, they will prefer to keep it that way.

You can lead a horse to water, but you cant make him/her drink.

If safety is a companies rule or policy, you'll have to adjust.
 

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There removed for certain operations and just never put back on. Most shops couldnt tell you were they are. Most likely thrown away.
Yeah. The lesson learned is to save your blade guard and remember where you put it. In the future after the part has been discontinued, it may be worth a lot to the few who want them and can't find them. ... Or it may separate your table saw from all the others when you get old and want to sell it.
 

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Yeah. The lesson learned is to save your blade guard and remember where you put it. In the future after the part has been discontinued, it may be worth a lot to the few who want them and can't find them. ... Or it may separate your table saw from all the others when you get old and want to sell it.
Who are the few? Are you talking about professionals?

Save your blade guard? Many shops in my era had tablesaws so old they disappeared.if it's not put in the office it wont exist in the shop.
 
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