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Say I want to rip 1/4" strips from stock, I always do a outboard cut for safefty reasons and change the fence for the next cut, others swear by a inboard cut for a constant cut, which do you prefer?
 

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depending on the length of the cuts, I have used 1/4" thick PVC lattice strips as a "filler".
make a cut, put in a strip, make a cut, put in a strip, etc etc etc.
(I too am not fond of the inboard cuts).
 

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I do an inboard for consistency. I have several thin push sticks for these cuts.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
6-8' strips The person I have seen doing this and commented that it was not very safe (no push blocks etc.) told me he knew what he was doing and mind my own business.
 

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We make a lot of scribe in the ship for cabinets. It's usually 3/16-1/4 when finished . We will cut it 1/16 larger than finished. We will rip half way, lift, flip and runt he other half. When it reaches the middle where it needs to fish, we lift it out.

I went to work at a commercial shop in Grain Valley, Mis sour one time. Worked about a week. The CNC operator missed a lot and we were out of parts. Another cabinet guy cut parts. I went to use the slider and it wouldn't workI asked the guy who usedan it last. He said he didnt want to turn it off and kicked the emergency. .I said okay and walked away. As I walked away he asked if I had a problem with that. I said no, just wanted to know why. When I went back to the bach the girl who had been there awhile said he was a jerk and you couldn't talk to him..

I quit that day. I won't work around drugs, alcoholics or people who can't get along...
 

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Some use an aluminum angle clamped to a skill saw to cut 1/4" strips for canoe making. They claim it's fast and pretty accurate.
 

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I had to do 1/4" cuts from a 19' board (5 boards 1x6 ) and did it inboard.
Feather boards on the fence before and after the blade.
Magnetic feathers on the table (before the blade).
Pulled the strip the last bit of it through the blade.
That's an extreme length though .
Push block sounds like a great idea for shorter lengths.
 

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I prefer inboard for consistency, it's easier and faster, no setup, no jigs.
I use a wider push block and cut into it OR for some narrow strips a narrow push "shoe".

I also use the "cut 1/2 way and flip" method, it all depends. On longer stock this works best because you don't have 6 ft of stock hanging over the back of the saw and flexing around which often will break a thin strip at a weak point. Been There Done That.

I also have the Rockler "Thin Rip Jig" because I thought it was a good idea. Haven't used it yet.

If I needed more than 10, I would use the inboard method and a pusher that rides on top of the fence. This will keep the pusher a constant distance from the fence and it will not get all chewed up as well as being safer.

When watching someone else work, see if they are receptive to suggestions by simply asking.
If they say "Sure, go ahead." then "fire away". OR put it in the form of a question... Why are you using a push block? What keeps the strip from shooting backwards? Why only cut part way and then flip it?
 

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For me, it would depend how accurate you want the 1/4” piece to be and length of cut. I alway try to put the work piece between the blade and fence.
 

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For me, it would depend how accurate you want the 1/4” piece to be and length of cut. I alway try to put the work piece between the blade and fence.
The "workpiece" is the entire piece and has two parts, the "cutoff or waste" and the "final dimension or saved" part, at least that's how I've always referred to it.
 
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You asked specifically about 1/4 inch width strips, but my answer here addresses the more general question of cutting thin strips.

My answer is: It depends on the width of the strip, and sometimes whether I am making many or just one.

If the strip is 1/4 inch or wider, I will cut it between the blade and the fence. I would use one of the following:
  • GRR-Ripper(s) with a 1/8 inch leg - I swapped the regular 1/4 inch legs with 1/8 inch legs for those narrow cuts. I leave the 1/8 inch leg "permanently" attached and the 1/4 inch leg goes unused. Using a GRR-Ripper means removing the splitter/blade guard and replacing it with the riving knife, but GRR-Rippers are very safe to use.
    https://www.microjig.com/products/grr-ripper
    https://www.microjig.com/products/grr-ripper-18-leg
  • Rockler Bench Dog Push-Loc push block - It is 3/8 inch wide, so obviously the strip must be wider than that. I like that the push handle is offset, keeping your hand farther away from the blade. I like that it holds the wood down (not just a push stick), too. With a cut like that, I may use one or two featherboards. The one on the table is in front of the blade, of course. Sometimes I clamp a featherboard or plain board to the fence.
    https://www.rockler.com/bench-dog-push-loc
  • Homemade sacrificial push block - Sometimes it is the best solution.
If the strip is 1/4 inch or less, then I will use one of:
  • Rockler thin rip jig - I don't recommend this specific product, but it works fine if it fits your saw. It does not fit jobsite saws. I like thin rip jigs, just not the Rockler one. There are so many homemade solutions that are just as good or better. Note: With thin rip jigs, the strip is on the outside of the blade, the side opposite the fence. Here it is, in case you're interested:
    https://www.rockler.com/thin-rip-tablesaw-jig
  • Homemade sacrificial push block, especially if I am making multiples of the same width. I clamp an auxiliary fence because I don't like the blade being so close to the "real" fence.
 

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We don't use push sticks in the shop.flipping long pices is easy unless you have restricted room. Usually low man on the totem pole gets this job..No reason to get anywhere near that blade. It also will tell you if the blade is square or not...

Now we are usually taking this rip leftovers no good for face frames, etc. But it will work the same you just might not have the clearance to flip over and may have to spin around..

Mike Nethrton use to save them. When he had enough he glued into 3/4×6" pieces about 7' long. Sanded and glued enough to have a 6x6×7' column. Then he hooked it up to his Legacy and made fireplace columns. Looked a bit funny, but that's woodworking...
 

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I prefer to use a push block made from 3/4” plywood on thinner cuts.

Zero clearance throat plate a must.

There is a point as which the bandsaw is a consideration. I‘ve been ripping a lot of thin strips (1/8”) for kumiko grids. I’ve been doing them on the bandsaw and drum sanding to final thickness (it has to be very exact). This issue is cut quality. Unless you’re using a carbide bandsaw blade you just can’t really come close,

I would like to do them on the table saw, but even a thin kerf 3/32” blade is too thick for me - too much waste.

@Tool Agnostic I did some further checking re:SawStop and I was told you can trick the saw using an 8” blade and a dado cartridge. But, the thinnest 8” blade I have found is the same as a 10” thin kerf.
 

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I would like to do them on the table saw, but even a thin kerf 3/32” blade is too thick for me - too much waste.

@Tool Agnostic I did some further checking re:SawStop and I was told you can trick the saw using an 8” blade and a dado cartridge. But, the thinnest 8” blade I have found is the same as a 10” thin kerf.
For the thinnest 8" blade look at circular saw blades. Their "thin kerf" blade are even thinner than table saw TK blades. At least the 7 1/4" blades are that way. There may be an 8 1/4" Skil saw blade like mine, I donno?

Like this:
 

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There are 1/16" (0.0625) 10" thin kerf blades so why go to a thicker 0.079 blade?

YUP, for $180.00 and shipping you can get yours. You do get a free "ultra" thin kerf splitter worth $20.00 however.

OR, you can spend $20.00 more on Amazon, for $200.00:
 
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