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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do not own a table saw. I do have a 12” sliding compound miter saw, with an 18” capacity. From time to time I have jigged it to do rip cuts. Despite some boneheaded mistakes, I have all my fingers and I think I’m over the peak of the learning curve.

After this experiment, I purchased this 24-tooth, 12” rip blade. I noticed on the packaging that it states it’s for use in a table saw, and not in a miter saw.

Aside from the general risk of ripping on a miter saw, is there some additional incompatibility between this blade and my saw?

Am I being downright idiotic in trying this tomfoolery to begin with?
 

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where's my table saw?
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Scary indeeed, and unsafe as well.....

I have done it once, but strongly advise against it! :vs_OMG:
I will go into why or how I needed to do it, but years of experience was on my side.



That rip blade may just dig into the workpiece and run forward despite what control you think you may have over it. Don't try it.



:|
 

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I've done it on an old cheapie radial arm saw. It worked, but I was not thrilled to to it.
 

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where's my table saw?
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A radial arm saw in not a miter saw!

I've done it on an old cheapie radial arm saw. It worked, but I was not thrilled to to it.

A radial arm saw has a carriage that will rotate 90 degrees and turn the blade parallel with the fence so you can rip with it. The miter saw does not have such a carriage. It only slides or pivots with the blade at 90 degrees to the fence. I have ripped many lineal feet using a radial arm saw, including 14 ft long boards. A miter saw is limited to the sliding capacity on the rails, typically about 16" or so, no where near the same.


:vs_cool:
 
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Interested Observer
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Neither of the links worked for me. Anyway, what I believe to be true is for little more than the cost of even the most rudimentary 12" blade you can find something classed as a table saw on CL. I have seen good running saws for table saws sell for little as little as $50. I have seen them given away. Barring that I would rather see a table saw made from a circular saw and a straight edge than ever use a miter saw for ripping.



The energy and money used on this silly dangerous effort will be better spent on some project that when complete will actually allow you to rip against a fence.


Good luck whatever you decide.
 

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Freehand ripping is dangerous on a table saw where you only have to control the material, twice as dangerous on a miter saw when you are trying to control both material and blade.

A good hand rip saw will cut through the 12" capacity you have on a miter saw in a few seconds.
 

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I do not own a table saw. I do have a 12” sliding compound miter saw, with an 18” capacity. From time to time I have jigged it to do rip cuts.
i'd say your no more ripping with a miter saw than cutting a crotch, burl or knot would require multiple blade changes
i have a cross cut blade in my ras but have no qualms about mitering past 45° with it than i do ripping short, but wide stock
imo, ripping requires you to push the lumber past the blade

whether you are using the correct blade or not is up in the air
i'm not a fan of changing blades, nor does a little smoke bother me >:)
 

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If your blade is above your material you should have a negative hook blade for ripping.

A table saw blade is positive hook because it is moving down and cutting by pressing the wood against the table, the tip of the tooth contacts the wood first. If you put that blade on a Radial Arm Saw or a sliding Compound Miter saw the angle of the teeth is set to fire that wood straight back towards you, the tip of the tooth will contact the wood from the bottom and lift it up as it pushes through - very dangerous. A Negative hook blade on an overhead saw contacts the wood with the heel of the tooth on the top of the wood and then pushes down as the blade rotates making the cut much safer.

My negative hook blades from Freud were over $100 each so you may want to just use the blade you bought for cross cutting and build yourself a track saw for long cuts.

 

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where's my table saw?
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Lost fact about ripping on a RAS .....

When I studied the blade's tendency to lift the work off the table using a standard table saw blade, with a positive hook, I realized that the nose of the blade guard could be rotated to hold the work down in front. This should always be the case when ripping no matter what blade you are using.

For crosscutting, the blade guard can be in it's normal horizontal position for maximum depth of cut. When I first began using a RAS some 25 or 30 years ago there weren't any negative hook blades at Sears, just the standard table saw blades, so that's what most folks used. :vs_OMG:That's why there were so many close calls or amputations, from the work being grabbed or thrown back. People didn't always pull the saw into the work, another big mistake. Pushing the saw into the work makes it want to rise up as the teeth enter the wood from the direction of rotation, lifting it up. You needed a very firm grip on your workpiece, holding it down and pressing it inwards towards the fence. Pushing it into the workpiece was an accident waiting to happen. Always pull your saw from behind the fence across your workpiece. However, a negative hook blade makes it much safer.

A hand held circular saw has the blade entering from the top just like a radial arm saw, BUT a circ saw has a base plate unlike a RAS. The base plate presses down on the work from the weight of the saw keeping the workpiece in place. The table saw, the radial arm saw, the miter saw all have some things in common but they are distinctly different in their operating process.


:vs_cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Follow-up: the blade made a HUGE difference. I got clean, easy rip cuts. This was the same material and cut that was billowing steam and smoke and bogging down the blade with a 60t blade.

To prevent the saw from running along the workpiece, I cut a block to jam in the slide so it couldn’t move forward.

 

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your cut will be much safer with a negative hook blade (clamp the piece down and be completely prepared for a saw coming toward you), and a FULL fence across the back, so the work is supported on both sides of the cut - which if unsupported is where i think the danger falls on this procedure. btdt
 

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Man!!! That blade is just sitting there waiting to chew something! Give it up, please. Where do you live? I'll rip it for you. I worked for a wood products manufacturer for over 10 years and I've seen some crazy **** but your operation there is semi-life threatening.
 

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At the end of the day, I don't really care what the OP does. If he wants to do a cutting operation with his tools that others find dangerous, all the power in the world to him. The OP can surely evaluate his own shop practice and shop safety.

That said, an anecdote on the power of a miter saw. A couple/few years back I had cut some oak strips 3/4X1-1/2" for banding on a 1-1/2 plywood router table top glue-up. I was cutting some 45 degree ends on those strips and fitting them. I cut one of them and the end piece wedged itself into the insert and then shot out of the saw. The piece ejected with so much power it went through a panel in the garage door. Even after it "holed" the door it ended up halfway down the driveway. I have a lot of respect for the power of a 12" miter saw.

As it relates to safe work habits we all have a line and they are all different. While none of us is perfect to be sure as that example clearly demonstrates, I surely don't invite obvious breaches of safety into my shop.

To the OP, good luck with your set-up.
 

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OK...I apologize for the alarmist post. I don't know what experience you have or your skill level, and I also, sometimes, use equipment for something it wasn't designed to do. I have learned to work with what I have. Good luck and be safe.


Charlie
 

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I have ripped on a radial arm saw and realized you have to be half out of your mind. It is an accident waiting to happen. My grandfather always stressed "right tool for the right job". I am sure you have a circular saw. You would be far better served making a sled for your circular saw long enough to do your rips. It will be far more accurate and you will live to talk about it.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I will not quote a previous post here .......

I also have ripped on a RAS, maybe about 1,000 lineal feet, each side of a 14 ft long 1" Cypress board, maybe 30 or so boards. There was NOT a single issue other than I used an extension cord of the wrong gauge, so the motor was overheating. It can be done safely and NO you don't have to be "out of your mind". If you do NOT know how the process can be done safely then by all means don't do it, BUT don't argue against it either. Here the thread showing my 28 ft long straight line rip using a 10" Craftsman RAS:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/evil-machine-28461/





 

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Dylan, the best way to get even cheeks and shoulders is to lay it out with a marking knife.

It’s a well thought out jig, but sometimes it is quicker (and safer!) to do certain tasks by hand. The time it takes to design and make a jig, do test cuts, dial it in, etc. you very well may have them all cut with a handsaw. Plus, if it’s a one off jig, you have all that time invested and never use it again.

My point is hand tool work can be just as accurate, in some cases more accurate, than a machine.

Either way you go, don’t try to cut the tenons perfect off the saw it’s too stressful and very difficult to do. Cut them big and use a chisel, rasp, and/or block plane to tune them up.

Cut the mortises first and fit the tenons to the mortises.
 
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