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Discussion Starter #1
what is your opinion on rip sleds? someone said they would not be safe and your better off using a rip fence. I have a crosscut sled that works great and thought a rip sled would be a good jig to use also. Seems a lot safer than a fence
 

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where's my table saw?
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why?

The table saw comes with a rip fence and is primarily designed to rip wood rather than cross cut it...hence the large number of "cross cut sleds" that have been designed and invented for them.

A sled makes no sense. :no: The longer the fence the more accurate and better will be the end result since there is more length to register against.

For ripping small pieces, just use your crosscut sled, and make a stop or support to register the small piece against.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Why

I had a large round tabletop that I needed to cut to a rectangle shape for a workbench I was building. I do not have a circular saw at this time and found it very difficult to cut freehand on tablesaw. I thought it would be more accurate if I had a sled to guide it
 

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where's my table saw?
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a saber saw

That's what I would use.
Or you "could" tack some plywood on the round pieces to act as guides/spacers for the table saw fence.
 

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It depends on the rip sled.By definition,"slider" tablesaws are a rip sleds.And can be a lot safer than not.

But some cobbled together affair,using questionable wood/engineering....then yes,there are safer alternatives.
 

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The table saw comes with a rip fence and is primarily designed to rip wood rather than cross cut it...hence the large number of "cross cut sleds" that have been designed and invented for them.

A sled makes no sense. :no: The longer the fence the more accurate and better will be the end result since there is more length to register against.

For ripping small pieces, just use your crosscut sled, and make a stop or support to register the small piece against.
Agree totally. When I read this "why" was also the first word that entered my mind.

George
 

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I had a large round tabletop that I needed to cut to a rectangle shape for a workbench I was building. I do not have a circular saw at this time and found it very difficult to cut freehand on tablesaw. I thought it would be more accurate if I had a sled to guide it
This is a special case, not a standard rip.

George
 

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I had a large round tabletop that I needed to cut to a rectangle shape for a workbench I was building. I do not have a circular saw at this time and found it very difficult to cut freehand on tablesaw. I thought it would be more accurate if I had a sled to guide it
NEVER try to free hand cut anything on a table saw! Agree with what has been said about attaching a straight edge to it to cut it on a TS.
Tom
 

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If you attach a straightedge, you may want to attach it on the bottom, and you would need to apply one at the other side to keep it level. I see a bit of difficulty if the round top is fairly large, like 6'. It could be cumbersome to handle.

It also depends on where the cut is made. If your fence is to the right of the blade, and you attach the straightedge to the right side to get a straight cut on the opposite side, you'll need enough right table and fence to accommodate that cut.

Or, if the straightedge is attached to the right side, and set to just take off enough of the curve to give a straight line, the mass of the table becomes the "waste" piece. If this is the case the section against the fence would have to have sufficient support to stay flat to the table throughout the cut, and this goes for the "waste" piece as well.






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