Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up this jointer today.

I bought it from a guy I occasionally work with.

He purchased it under the spell of woodworking but decided he was more into metal work and needed it out of his shop.

$100 including help loading.

I need to find an optimal location in my 2 car (0 car) shop but for $100. I think I can find a suitable spot.

For the time being I'll keep my Delta 6" bench top.

It has served me well and will still come in handy for field use.

I didn't do any research on the Ridgid. I snapped it up when I heard the price.

Do any of you guys have knowledge of this unit?

I'm looking for opinions and advice, the good, bad and the ugly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,389 Posts
I used to own this unit and for $100 you got a steal. It's a good 6" jointer in my opinion when properly tuned. There are aftermarket blades available for it too, since the Ridgid blades are hard to find. I actually regret selling mine. One of the dumber moves I've made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, figured I couldn't go wrong.

I downloaded the manual and need to go through setup procedure's and test it.

You'll notice the photo is framed pretty tight.

The shop is a mess and has to be dealt with before I even plug this thing in again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
I picked up this jointer today.

I bought it from a guy I occasionally work with.

He purchased it under the spell of woodworking but decided he was more into metal work and needed it out of his shop.

$100 including help loading.

I need to find an optimal location in my 2 car (0 car) shop but for $100. I think I can find a suitable spot.

For the time being I'll keep my Delta 6" bench top.

It has served me well and will still come in handy for field use.

I didn't do any research on the Ridgid. I snapped it up when I heard the price.

Do any of you guys have knowledge of this unit?

I'm looking for opinions and advice, the good, bad and the ugly.
I owned both the Delta and Ridgid at one time. I obtained the Delta first (on a budget), and ended up modifying it considerably, including adding another table clamp knob on the opposite side. This took some drilling work and a bit of finesse, but the single knob on the front just did not hold the in-feed table steady enough. I also did quite a bit to true up the fence.

After a while, I purchased the Ridgid (new, and not at the steal price you paid), and, well, it certainly is superior to the little Delta, if only because the larger tables allow for longer boards to be cut truer. Actually, I really like the top-blade cylinder lock on the Delta, which makes it easier to adjust blade cutting depth than with the Ridgid.

I have a small shop and the Delta was using up counter space, and since I could do everything the Delta could do with the Ridgid (and more), I sold the Delta to a lucky buyer. Hopefully he is getting solid use out of it.

As for the Ridgid, I love it. I did a review of it here some time back, and about the only thing I did to it was install a solid base with soft-tread casters under it so that I could easily move it out of my small shop onto an adjacent work deck. Oh, I also replaced the plastic tips on the various knobs and handles with ones made of wood. I like wooden knobs and have done this with a lot of my tools.

Howard Ferstler
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great to hear from you Howard,

I did read your very thorough and concise write up and referenced it in one of my previous posts.

It was exactly what I was looking for and included a lot of info not included in the OM.

I copied and pasted your review to a word doc, printed it and tucked it into the OM for future reference.

The first thing I'm going to do is build a rolling base with locking castors as you described.

This will allow me to move the unit around in my small shop and elevate it to a more comfortable working height (I'm 6'-2").

Once I place the jointer on a platform a five gallon bucket will fit nicely under the chute to catch shavings.

Thanks again Howard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
Great to hear from you Howard,

I did read your very thorough and concise write up and referenced it in one of my previous posts.

It was exactly what I was looking for and included a lot of info not included in the OM.

I copied and pasted your review to a word doc, printed it and tucked it into the OM for future reference.

The first thing I'm going to do is build a rolling base with locking castors as you described.

This will allow me to move the unit around in my small shop and elevate it to a more comfortable working height (I'm 6'-2").

Once I place the jointer on a platform a five gallon bucket will fit nicely under the chute to catch shavings.

Thanks again Howard
Yeah, the bucket is a good idea. I had mine hooked up to my dust collector for a while, and it basically blew the chips out into my "natural" back yard. This has resulted in a buildup of wood shavings (from other tools, too) that I will skim off in a month and replace with leaves moved from other parts of the yard.

However, why use the collector when gravity will do the job just fine, with less wood materials to skim off periodically. The chute angle is steep enough that the stuff just slides out onto the floor, and all I now do is put down a sheet of newspaper and roll it up into a ball after doing the work and discard it. I blow out the interior of the jointer, too, but that is no big deal and I was doing it when I was using the collector.

Glad you can use the rolling-base idea. I actually do not use locking casters, but the thing seems to stay pretty stable without them. The casters I use now have 4-inch wheels with soft tires. Make sure the base is wide enough so that the caster contact points on the floor are at least as wide all the time as the edges of the stand. Otherwise, the thing might be too tippy.

Howard
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top