Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Ridgid TS3660 Table saw used. It looks brand new. It looks like its hardly been used a all. I went through it and made all the alignment adjustments using the user manual. I have ben using it a lot with 90 degree cuts. When I went to check the 45 degree stop point, it starts to bind at about 20 degrees. I tried cleaning the screw turn that adjust the angle without improvement. Next I want to lubricate the screw. Not sure if I should use WD-40 or something else. What do you guys think? Any input or other ideas will be much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
I recently purchased a Ridgid TS3660 Table saw used. It looks brand new. It looks like its hardly been used a all. I went through it and made all the alignment adjustments using the user manual. I have ben using it a lot with 90 degree cuts. When I went to check the 45 degree stop point, it starts to bind at about 20 degrees. I tried cleaning the screw turn that adjust the angle without improvement. Next I want to lubricate the screw. Not sure if I should use WD-40 or something else. What do you guys think?

a spray on dry lube is preferred to prevent accumulations of sawdust around grease/oil based lubricants.

Any input or other ideas will be much appreciated.
try this: there's a plate on the inside of the cabinet where the bevel adjustment rod comes through the cabinet. it's secured to the cabinet with screws. check to see that it is't too tight. the bevel rod has to pivot off the rotating ball fitting on the bevel rod that the inside plate secures to the saw cabinet so the mechanism can bevel easily.

http://www.ridgid.com/ASSETS/FD9D936024C445A4B2DC94BB61DB3794/TS3650_402_r.pdf

(figure f, part 5)

also, make sure that the bevel angle set screws (figure G, part 19 (2 pieces)) aren't screwed too deeply into the table top. their purpose is to "stop" the saw bevel at 90° and 45°. i back mine out all the way out so they are useless. i've found that accumulations of sawdust on the parts of the trunions the set screws register against can easily throw off the settings. i use either a drafting square or a wixey digital angle cube to set all angles.

BTW, if you're willing to relegate the tape measure on the front rail to uselessness, the front and rear rails on that saw can be slid to the right about another 12" providing for 48" of rip capacity. ripping left of the blade is not possible in this configuration, but in a pinch, it can be quite useful.

hope this helps. that's a really good saw and some pics of your acquisition would be much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
Be sure that the slots inside the trunnion brackets aren't gauled, and give them a good lubing.



Get it aligned, and put a good blade on it....you'll be all set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have loosened the screws for both the stops and the cabinet screws already. I guess I'll have to pull apart the trunnion brackets and make sure they're not packed full of sawdust. What kind of lube is recommended?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
I have loosened the screws for both the stops and the cabinet screws already. I guess I'll have to pull apart the trunnion brackets and make sure they're not packed full of sawdust. What kind of lube is recommended?
remove the fence rails and extension wings in anticipation of flipping the saw on it's table. it's very simple linkage that bevels and elevates. should be easy to see where it's binding, once it's inverted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys. I love this saw. It replaced a smaller craftsman P.O.S.. Its like going from an old Fiat to a new Porsche. I'm sure some of you have much better saws but its perfect for what I do.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top