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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Used to being an expert hanging around AV forums, pretty handy around the house replacing drywall, framing and installing a new corner fireplace and so forth. Fixing up my front porch, going to frame a bump out wall for a 2nd flr return duct, and might take a stab at building a dining room table. Figure it was time to not use my circular saw to rip some boards and get the right tool for the job, well, as right as it gets under $300. Space is a premium, and I like the idea of the folding stand types. Missed picking up the Dewalt for $275 from Amazon the other week which I think would've done the trick.

Poking around I found the Craftsman 21828 Jobsite one for $240 and decided to pick it up as it was literally the last one in the tri state area. Doing more research I started looking at used Ridgids and have a guy selling the TS2410LS that I think I can get for $250. I also have no real storage so I'll be hauling it up from the basement to the driveway for use. So I pretty much said no to the more full size ones.

So I thought I'd sign up and hopefully get some opinions after poking around a few threads. Would the Craftsman be a decent starter one or are they pretty much junk now? Worth it to spend the extra money on the DEWALT DW745 or would I be better served with the used Ridgid? Thanks in advance. The plan is to finish the porch over the holiday weekend. Don't get that kind of time too often, and I'm hoping the rain finally passes.
 

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Some Craftsman is junk, some not.... the 21828 is pretty much identical to the Ridgid R4516, both made by TTI/Ryobi. No idea how good either one is. I don't have much experience with portables, but I do know that the Bosch 4100, DW744, and Ridgid R4510 are typically the most highly regarded. The DW745 is smaller than the 744. I also know that setup and blade selection are huge factors in the end performance of any saw. Good luck, I'm sure someone with more insights will be along soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Didn't realize Ridgid had that model. Doesn't seem like a bad little saw.

Here it is on Home Depot Canada. $379 and good reviews.

Here's a quick Tool Hound review.

I think I might have a keeper at that price. Quite a few positive reviews, one I quoted below. I have till tomorrow to decide so any other opinions are welcome. Also, I think the Craftsman includes the outfeed support where it is/was an option on the Ridgid.

Let me start by saying that I am not a table saw aficionado. I much prefer a radial arm saw for its versatility. But, there are times when a small table saw fills the bill, especially when you are lugging it around to job sites. That's exactly what this saw is made for and does well. Most job site saws are larger and have attached stands. This is fine if all your jobs are accessible by flat smooth surfaces, but they seldom are. The added weight of an attached stand requires two people to carry up stairs or across a field. This saw can be carried or wheeled. It would be nice if a separate folding stand were available for this, but there doesn't seem to be. It does work fairly well to just bolt it to a pair of saw horses.
This saw begs comparison to the similar DeWalt mini job site saw also sold by Sears. The Craftsman saw has many advantages: lower price, greater rip capacity, a real metal miter gauge, a side and outfeed extension, wheels, and a telescoping handle. The DeWalt has a rack and pinion fence mechanism that insures a parallel fence and is a little lighter. It also has a full thickness blade insert and available stand. It was an easy choice for me. I refuse to pay Dewalt prices for a saw with a plastic miter gauge. And besides, I'm still mad at Dewalt for not making there excellent radial arm saws anymore.
This saw is made in Taiwan by a company that also makes saws for Ridgid whose jobsite saw is top rated by a leading consumer magazine. Ridgid actually sold a cosmetically altered version of this saw as a special edition of a while. My saw came pretty well set up right out of the box. I made slight adjustments to the blade heeling, the rip fence, and the riving knife. These adjustments are all easily accessible. The heeling adjustment is particularly easy because of a eccentric bolt which allow precision changes. The guard is the best I have ever experience on a table saw. The splitter is hefty and easily adjustable in three different dimensions. In the past I've never been able to get a good adjustment on cheap splitters so I didn't use them. I may actually use this one. It has toolless, modular kickback pawls and guard. Much heftier than what I am used to on inexpensive saws. One complaint is that the blade insert is not thick enough to allow replacement by zero clearance inserts. Also, it only takes a 1/2" dado. You need 3/4" for shelf inlets. It has a dust collection shroud around the blade an outlet tube. Oddly enough it doesn't come with a bag. I bought a Bosch bag and it works fine. Most of the dust--not all--goes in the bag. I would collect more with a vacuum, but who wants to hassle with that. The fence works well. The miter gauge is sturdy metal but a little loose in the slot. The table extension lock was a little weak when I got it, but was easily adjusted with a turnbuckle under the table. The table is almost perfectly flat with a very slight roll-off at the rear. I don't care so much for the painted table, but I suppose machining it would add a lot to the price.
I bought this to replace another Craftsman saw in this price range. The other was much flimsier, made by another supplier, and not up to professional standards at all, but then it wasn't marketed as such. I think this saw pretty well lives up the "Professional" designation. I used to repair typewriters, so I know machines pretty well. I think this is quite well made compared to much of the junk that is on the market today. I've been a professional builder for several years, and I like this saw. I'd give it a 4.5 if I could. Not quite 5 because of the drawbacks I have mentioned.
 

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Don't know if Ebates.com works in Canada, but they're currently offering 6% Cashback for online purchases made at Sears (5% through HD). Enter their websites through Ebates.com, order online, pickup at the store with full return privileges, and the cashback will occur automatically in 60 days. Any other discount codes are still applicable too. :thumbsup:

You can pick up a decent $30-$40 blade from the Freud Diablo line, some Freud Industrial, Irwin Marples, DeWalt Precision Trim series, CMT ITK Plus at places like Lowes or HD....maybe even Amazon. Looks like Sears.CA doesn't offer much in suitable saw blades. A good 3/32" thin kerf will be easier for that saw to spin than a 1/8" full kerf.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not in Canada. That was the only HD site that still had it listed. I picked up the Craftsman version for $239. It was the last one in the DE store or in the midatlantic area. No sales tax either. And the Craftsman version includes the out feed support which you have to buy separately if you buy the Ridgid version.

Will start off with the included blade for some basic board rips on the porch and check out the ones you mentioned for down the road.
 

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Congrats on the new purchase. One thing I found is to make sure you use the right blade for the job with these jobsite table saws. It makes a huge difference. Get a 24-30 tooth thin kerf blade to rip and then something around 60 tooth for crosscutting. I don't like the "combination blades" that claim to be useful for ripping and crosscut on these smaller saws. They work fine for cross cuts but can really bog down a saw on the rips. I used an older Hitachi for a few houses and also ran the Ridgid model from about 5 years ago during a renovation. I found a huge gain in performance when using the right blade.

That looks like a great saw for $240! Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Congrats on the new purchase. One thing I found is to make sure you use the right blade for the job with these jobsite table saws. It makes a huge difference. Get a 24-30 tooth thin kerf blade to rip and then something around 60 tooth for crosscutting. I don't like the "combination blades" that claim to be useful for ripping and crosscut on these smaller saws. They work fine for cross cuts but can really bog down a saw on the rips. I used an older Hitachi for a few houses and also ran the Ridgid model from about 5 years ago during a renovation. I found a huge gain in performance when using the right blade.

That looks like a great saw for $240! Enjoy.
I would imagine the different blades create different amounts of resistance on specific jobs and thus stress the motor differently so that makes sense in my book. Thanks for the advice. I've got Lowes and HD in the vicinity and both accept my military id for an extra 10% off so we'll see who's cheaper.
 
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