Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
novice wood hacker
Joined
·
514 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have Ridgid R4512 Table saw, about a year old. The 2 times I have really worked it, after it gets good and warm suddenly the motor loses power, won't come up to speed, and vibrates a lot. If I try to run it even with no load it will only run for a few seconds and then trip the ckt. breaker. Once it cools down, it works fine again.

The first time it happened I was ripping down 8' 2x4's with a Freud diablo thin kerf combination blade for about 20 min straight before it acted up. Today I was using the same blade to cut 1/2" and 3/4" plywood parts down to size for about a half hour before it started acting up.

Anyone know what would cause this? I e-mailed ridged about it and they said I'd have to send the whole saw in, but I'm afraid they wouldn't be able to duplicate the problem or would tell me there's nothing wrong with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,769 Posts
The problem with the circuit breaker is probably do to the saw drawing more power than your wiring can handle. You may need to upgrade the wiring for the saw. There are a lot of things that might cause the vibration and one would have to be there to really tell. I would guess the thin kerf blade warped from cutting the 2x4's. It would be better if you used a standard thickness blade with fewer teeth for 2x4's. You might get a different blade and see if that solves the problem. It doesn't take very much heat to warp a saw blade and sometimes if you let them cool while running they will straighten themselves out.
 

·
novice wood hacker
Joined
·
514 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The problem is definitely something electrical within the saw itself. I built my workshop myself, and I dedicated a 20A circuit for each wall of receptacles. When it happened the first time, I immediately checked that I could turn the blade by hand and the blade itself wasn't hot at all, or bent/warped. I tried plugging it into a receptacle on another circuit and checked that everything was in order up to the saw. I pulled off the back cover and started to try to troubleshoot, but everything I know how to check seemed fine. I am an industrial maintenance tech, and have done my share of electrical work on industrial equipment, but it was all 3 phase, so I have very little experience with single phase electric motors.

Edit: I did buy a thin kerf 24 tooth rip blade for these operations after it acted up the first time. But now it did it just cutting plywood, so there has to be something wrong with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,769 Posts
If you have had it running at all then you must have it wired alright. According to Ridgid's website it is 13amp 110v single phase. It wouldn't be wired any different than an electric drill. As far as the blade I've seen people get a blade so hot it changed color and by the time the saw stopped it was cool to touch. You really can't go by temperature to determine if the blade is warped. You would need to put something like a screwdriver up against the blade and turn the blade by hand and see if it turns out of round.
 

·
novice wood hacker
Joined
·
514 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You would need to put something like a screwdriver up against the blade and turn the blade by hand and see if it turns out of round.
Are you thinking radial warpage (you would see the blade wobble from looking down at it) or eccentrical warpage (you would see it from looking at it from the side, like the arbor hole isn't centered)?

When it acted up today I was using my crosscut sled, and that would have shown any radial warpage.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
I would first start with an electrical problem. Is any other item on the same circuit? Are you using an extension cord? If so, what's the length and gauge? Is it in good shape? Does the cord, plug, or outlet get warm or hot?

You might also just use compressed air and blow out the motor and the switch. Could be sawdust blocking the airways. Check to see if there are any chips or debris that bear on running parts that could offer resistance.






.
 

·
novice wood hacker
Joined
·
514 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I run my benchtop jointer on the same circuit (not at the same time), but it never has any issues. I wasn't using an extension cord either time it acted up. Nothing gets hot outside of the saw. I know when I opened up the back panel the first time it acted up, the motor was warm, but not too warm to touch so I wouldn't consider it overheated. I wonder if the start cap. is weak, and bogging down the motor slightly is overworking it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
Can you convert it to 220V? It could just be you're reaching the boundaries of what it was meant to do. Switching to 220V will help it not work as hard and should push the boundaries out further.

I assume you don't have anything else running on your current 110 circuit it's on. If the 4512 is being starved for amperage, that will cause the overheating/circuit tripping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I have the same saw and i immediately switched to 220. Makes a world of difference. 110 just makes that saw completely underpowered. Have your service man take a look at it. I know the motor is enclosed fan cooled, however, dust could possibly enter through the arbor. Do a complete blow down and use lubricant. Also, is your dust collection strong enough?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17 Posts
Do you have a good multimeter? I'd start testing your circuits to start eliminating potential issues with the shop's wiring. Regardless of you trusting your work, the breakers could be faulty, cords could be faulty, there's a bunch of things that can be going wrong. But, a good multimeter troubleshooting process should help you start checking things off the possible defect list.

I just purchased this saw and had to abandon plans to use the 70 gallon DC system from Harbor Freight because I have a detached garage with only (2) 20A breakers, and I wouldn't be able to turn on my lights and run the saw and DC motor at the same time. I use 4 sets of old flourescent tube lighting systems which are very inefficient lights, so I'm drawing 8 Amps just for lighting. Your power consumption may be more than what you think, but obviously I have no clue about your particular setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
if problem exists in a "no load" condition, that is blade is on but no cutting action, as you mentioned, and on a dedicated 20a circuit (verify all of this), the problem is likely the motor/power transmission system. direct drive? belts/pulleys/bearings ok? has it had any harsh environment? check out the run capacitor/centrifugal switch if there is one.

electrical circuit of saw is definitely in question if it is tripping a 20a ckt bkr
 

·
novice wood hacker
Joined
·
514 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have narrowed it down to something electrical in the saw. I talked to one of the electricians at work and he explained how to proceed troubleshooting. I''ll let you guys know what I find. It could be awhile because I need to get it to act up before I can test it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
I am register for the LSA, but if I can fix it myself I will, since it's not worth the hassle of breaking down my saw and hauling it in for something that is not a major fix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I have Ridgid R4512 Table saw, about a year old. The 2 times I have really worked it, after it gets good and warm suddenly the motor loses power, won't come up to speed, and vibrates a lot. If I try to run it even with no load it will only run for a few seconds and then trip the ckt. breaker. Once it cools down, it works fine again.

The first time it happened I was ripping down 8' 2x4's with a Freud diablo thin kerf combination blade for about 20 min straight before it acted up. Today I was using the same blade to cut 1/2" and 3/4" plywood parts down to size for about a half hour before it started acting up.

Anyone know what would cause this? I e-mailed ridged about it and they said I'd have to send the whole saw in, but I'm afraid they wouldn't be able to duplicate the problem or would tell me there's nothing wrong with it.
Did you ever find a solution to your R4512 problem? I just got one and having similar problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I actually got it to work tonight. After checking the wiring from the power cord to the motor (to ensure it was wired right) I simply took the blade off and hand spun the arbor about 10 times. I started it the motor up and it trudged along for 5 seconds or so then got into normal RPMs. Turned it off, waiting 30 seconds then fired it up again with no issues. I think the problem might have been that the saw was sitting in storage at Home Depot so long the internal lube thickened to the point the motor couldn't start up. Just needed to be broken free.

Thanks for the advice. I hope to be making saw dust this weekend.

JDM
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top