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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys.....

So I recently picked up a dewalt radial arm saw....one of the old cast iron arm ones. Anyhow....So I was going to fire it up and try it out before I went through rewiring it.....but decided to pull it apart and take a look first. Glad I did...as the wiring is in TERRIBLE condition. Anyhow.....I'm pretty comfortable with wiring....but do have a few general questions....

1. The radial arm saw is one with the goofy key switch on the side of the arm......anyone ever move the switch to a paddle switch on the front? Seems it might be easier to use.....Thoughts???

2. Any particular type of wiring I should be using? The motor is a 14 amp motor......as my subpanel is just about full.....its going to have to run on 110.
 

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Hey Guys.....

So I recently picked up a dewalt radial arm saw....one of the old cast iron arm ones. Anyhow....So I was going to fire it up and try it out before I went through rewiring it.....but decided to pull it apart and take a look first. Glad I did...as the wiring is in TERRIBLE condition. Anyhow.....I'm pretty comfortable with wiring....but do have a few general questions....

1. The radial arm saw is one with the goofy key switch on the side of the arm......anyone ever move the switch to a paddle switch on the front? Seems it might be easier to use.....Thoughts???

2. Any particular type of wiring I should be using? The motor is a 14 amp motor......as my subpanel is just about full.....its going to have to run on 110.
I'm not familar with the wiring on your Dewalt saw. There is no reason though you can't relocate the switch somewhere else with a different type switch. I have a Craftsman saw the switch wore out an I mounted a toggle switch under the saw to replace it. I just had to re-route the wires off the arm. With 14 amps I would use 12 gauge stranned wire to wire it.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #3
I know I can make it work, just not sure if there's any reason I don't want to move the switch there

Here was the condition of the wire in it....
 

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Assuming you are referring solely to the wiring from the motor to the switch, 3 strand 14 ga or 12 ga would be fine.

It appears it's just the jacket on that middle strand of yours that is bad. I assume everything inside the main jacket is fine so you could just address the exposed jacket issue and continue to use that same wire.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #5
The wire from the wall to the motor is what I'm replacing. It's cracked in a few other places as we'll and is close to 50 years old.....I think the saw deserves some new copper...
 

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I've done several, it's not hard. It sound like you are replacing all of it. Without knowing what model that is: for the smaller motors (925, MBF, etc., the ones generally rated at 10 amps or less) I use 14 gauge wire. For the larger ones (1030, 1030K, etc.) I use 12 guage, although I'm sure 14 would be OK for those. The hard part is getting the cable clamp on the motor to accept it, that's why I prefer the 14. As for the switch, I'd suggest you try it where it is for a while before moving anything. I really don't see it as being that inconvenient, or unsafe (just my personal opinion). But I've seen several attempts at changing it, from putting a toggle switch on the top of the yoke handle to placing an entire handy box on the top end of the arm. They all look like chit and have wires stretching all over the place. I would suggest something about that keyed switch you have. I have one on one saw and reallt don't like the way it works. I intend (and suggest to you) that you replace it with a double pole, single throw (DPST) toggle switch. Have it break both lines in case you ever will be on 240V service. The GB switch I linked will fit right in exactly in place of the key switch (which may have some aftermarket value).

Edit to ad: you may want to go ahead and replace the bearings while it's dis assembled. It'a an easy job. The bearings will run about $20, you probably will need to have a way to pull them and put them back on. If that's a 925 or 1030K, they have a centrifugal brake that can be a little tedious when doing this, but still an easy job. BTW, if you want a coupe of PDF files to help with that saw, I can e-mail them.
 

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E mail sent, let me know if it gets lost, I'll keep trying.
 

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The wire from the wall to the motor is what I'm replacing. It's cracked in a few other places as we'll and is close to 50 years old.....I think the saw deserves some new copper...
Then 12ga (20a) to be safe; 14ga (15a) would probably be fine but the cost difference is negligible.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #10
Fred....message received. Thanks.

I was planning on 12 gauge, but I am concerned a bit about getting it through the clamp on the motor housing. The way that's designed it's a 90 degree angle in.

Guess I'll see what Home Depot has by the foot.....maybe the outer diameter is a bit smaller than it was 50 years ago.
 

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where's my table saw?
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ON 110 Volts

http://www.stayonline.com/reference-circuit-ampacity.aspx

This chart shows No. 14 Ga wire with a capacity of 15 Amps.
If you were to change over to 220V you'll only need half that or 8 Amps.
20 Amp switches are usually not that small, but they are available in double pole at the Home depot. I have used them for motors myself.
The other 110 or 220 V switches from Grizzly will also fit in a small outlet box, but probably not with 12 Ga.
 

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I just did my 1030K (square arm version of the 1030) and I used #12. I can tell you it was a battle getting that clamp on, but not impossible. I also just redid a Frame 236 for a 925. That's an 11 amp motor, and I used #14, still a battle, but the clamp on that one is smaller than the one on the 1030. To get around that 90° corner, I bend the wire and then squeeze it in my wood vice. That way it holds it's shape for about 2 minutes while I try to get everything back into the hole on the motor.

BTW, should have mentioned this earlier, just thought of it. I have seen those saws fitted with a switch on the frame, then the wire from the switch just runs to the arm, inside the arm, and then to the motor. No switch at all on the arm. I still didn't like it but it was a lot cleaner than the other attempts I've seen.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #13
I guess for now I'll keep the key switch and see how it is. If I was to do the switch, it wouldn't be mounted on the arm. That would look like junk.
 

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Fred....message received. Thanks.

I was planning on 12 gauge, but I am concerned a bit about getting it through the clamp on the motor housing. The way that's designed it's a 90 degree angle in.

Guess I'll see what Home Depot has by the foot.....maybe the outer diameter is a bit smaller than it was 50 years ago.
I just rewired my table saw for 240v and used 12 gauge that I got at HD. It was $1.10 a foot and I got 10 feet of it.

Also, I refurbished a 1950 Delta RAS some time ago and used 12 gauge as well. It worked well, even when I had to bend it 90 degrees in the back. If I were you, like someone else already said, I'd replace all the wiring.:thumbsup:
 

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where's my table saw?
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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #16
Ok, so I just picked up 15 feet of 14 gauge soow....the saw has had 14 gauge it's entire 55 year life....I decided it will likely be fine for another 50....

Also, there isn't much room in the motor cover, so the added flex of 14 gauge will likely be useful.

After standing there thinking for a few minutes, I did opt for a switch....I think it will be more useable than the key. Here's the switch I opted for...any issue using ring terminals on a switch like this??
 

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Shouldn't be. I used the ones with the open ends (shaped like a "U"), and it worked fine.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #18
Alright....all rewired. Saw fires right up....probably should have put new bearings in it.....but I guess that's getting saved for a later date.


Next I need to get a new table built for it. The plan is 48 inches wide....

As for depth....where do you all set the fence....I'm thinking of setting it to get 1.5 inches of depth at the fence....thoughts?
 

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The Dewalts factory fences were movable, adjusting them to the column allowed a wider ripping cut when needed. To do that the back section was 2 pieces, and could be switched around. One of those back pieces also had a large cutout in it, that was to allow clearance for molding head cutters/guards etc, when the motor was rotated 90º. Personally, I do do any of that (including ripping). Anyway, I gave it about 2 3/4" of clearance at the fence (that, BTW, is about 1/4" short of the maximum cutting depth), but you can make it anything you want. The fence needs to be of a softer wood which allows it to be squeezed flat against the table, which is perfectly squared to the arm and has a perfectly straight edge. If you want to go with the multiple back pieces I can probably find the factory dimensions somewhere, or come up with what you want. In my case that piece wound up being 6 3/4" wide. My arrangement gives me about 13" of 90º cross cut capacity. I made the fence so it's 1" above the table. While my fence is 48" wide, my table is only 40". I had a 48" years ago on a craftsman and found it to take up a lot of room. Did that #14 wire fit the cable clamp? I was wondering if it may have been a little loose.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #20
I don't plan on ripping anything on it...ever...as I have the table saw five feet away, so I had planned on setting it up for crosscut only. I think ill set my fence back a bit further as I would prefer max crosscut capability over depth.


The 14 gauge wire was a tight fit, after some careful measuring that's exactly what came out of there and I don't see how 12 would have fit....


Thanks to all....I'll update as I get further.
 
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