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Discussion Starter #1
So I bought an old craftsman table saw for dirt cheap, it is from the 60's. It worked very well for about two months then It started shocking the hell out of me every time I touched it. I still used it because I needed it. Then one day the switch started smoking so I turned it off and haven't used it since. I got all the wiring and a new switch and rewired it I turned it on and the motor sounds funny and it throws a breaker within two minutes of turning it on.... Soooo any ideas? I think I may have shorted the motor out.
 

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Tommie,

The motor may not be shorted, but there was a short before you changed the switch.

It sounds like the motor start capacitor is not engaging. This is resulting in a large current draw on start-up, causing the breaker to trip.

Hard to help without seeing the wiring diagram. I hope the inside of the motor terminal box has one. Otherwise you may need to post the specific model of the saw for others who have the same to advise.

Also a picture of the switch wiring and motor terminal box wiring may help.
 

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What do you mean the motor sound funny? Does it rotate at all or just hum? Is the saw belt driven or direct drive?
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm not sure how to describe the sound , it just didn't sound right and it is belt driven and the diagram as far as what I did was simple. There are two prongs on the motor the white goes on top the black on bottom and then ground the ground wire. then to wire the switch I just ran the wires into the switch box and broke the black wire and wired it up to the two screws so the switch could break the circuit when it was turned off. I again grounded the ground wire to the ground screw. I ran the white wire all the way through the switch box with out breaking it then wired up the plug white wire to silver screw black to bronze colored screw ground to green screw
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Tommie,

The motor may not be shorted, but there was a short before you changed the switch.

It sounds like the motor start capacitor is not engaging. This is resulting in a large current draw on start-up, causing the breaker to trip.

Hard to help without seeing the wiring diagram. I hope the inside of the motor terminal box has one. Otherwise you may need to post the specific model of the saw for others who have the same to advise.

Also a picture of the switch wiring and motor terminal box wiring may help.
Where would I find the start capacitor. What is the start capacitor? How do I fix it lol
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the model number is 113-12070 and the manufacturing number is ks55cp-204

Thanks for any advise given
 

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Where would I find the start capacitor. What is the start capacitor? How do I fix it lol
A recent thread of a Public Service Announcement to provide information on the different types of motors.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/psa-information-ac-motors-48497/

If you have one "bump" on the side of the motor you have a start capacitor. This is to help reduce the inrush current.

If you have two "bumps" on the side of the motor you have a start and a separate run capacitor. The start is to lower inrush current the run is for efficiency.
 

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Be careful when removing the capacitor. If it is good it can deliver a shock to you even with power removed. To remove it disconnect power and take a screw driver and short out the two terminals. This will discharge the capacitor.
Tom
 

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Where would I find the start capacitor. What is the start capacitor? How do I fix it lol
There was a recent thread on motors. If I recall the capacitor was not broken but was not engaging.

I have to see if I can find it.

Do not remove the capacitor until you have eliminated other potential root causes.

Chaincarver Steve did an excellent thread on troubleshooting motors. Please look at this while I try and find another thread on motor problems.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/repair-your-bandsaw-other-motor-crash-course-46405/
 

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Dave Paine said:
There was a recent thread on motors. If I recall the capacitor was not broken but was not engaging.

I have to see if I can find it.

Do not remove the capacitor until you have eliminated other potential root causes.

Chaincarver Steve did an excellent thread on troubleshooting motors. Please look at this while I try and find another thread on motor problems.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/repair-your-bandsaw-other-motor-crash-course-46405/
Dave I remember seeing that thread. If I remember right the switch that is closed on starting and opens when the motor reaches a certain speed had dirty contacts.
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #11
wow guys thanks for all the help I don't think it is the connectors but I will try that and here are some pics of the motor. Also I looked for a bump on the motor and couldn't find one... Am I overlooking it? Or am I just blind
 

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wow guys thanks for all the help I don't think it is the connectors but I will try that and here are some pics of the motor. Also I looked for a bump on the motor and couldn't find one... Am I overlooking it? Or am I just blind
The capacitor can be found inside where you see the red outline. The housing unscrews from the motor case.
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motor.jpg





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call these guys

http://local.yahoo.com/details?id=18907136&stx=electric+motor+repair&csz=Gainesville+TX

Ask them what they would charge to "check out" a motor that has stopped working. Don't say anything about "smoke". Make an accurate diagram of the wires, their color and which terminal they are on. Then bring it over to them... you may have to leave it if they are busy, otherwise most shops will wire it up on the counter to test it.

THAT motor has suffered a lot already. It hasn't been cleaned out, is probably full of sawdust, and has been in a high moisture environment. So, they should also clean and inspect it. You got it for dirt, so don't expect it to run like diamonds.... just sayin". You may have to put $25.00 into it. There are moving contactor inside the round end plates and unless you know what you are doing you can muck them up.
 
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http://local.yahoo.com/details?id=18907136&stx=electric+motor+repair&csz=Gainesville+TX

Ask them what they would charge to "check out" a motor that has stopped working. Don't say anything about "smoke". Make an accurate diagram of the wires, their color and which terminal they are on. Then bring it over to them... you may have to leave it if they are busy, otherwise most shops will wire it up on the counter to test it.

THAT motor has suffered a lot already. It hasn't been cleaned out, is probably full of sawdust, and has been in a high moisture environment. So, they should also clean and inspect it. You got it for dirt, so don't expect it to run like diamonds.... just sayin". You may have to put $25.00 into it. There are moving contactor inside the round end plates and unless you know what you are doing you can muck them up.

And that tag shows it can be wired for 110 or 220 volt which would be a different switch you would need a DPDT switch to wire 220.
 

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And that tag shows it can be wired for 110 or 220 volt which would be a different switch you would need a DPDT switch to wire 220.
that may not be true. many dual voltage tools use switches that function in both 110 and 220 configurations. only the motor connections and plug need to be changed. i believe c-mans used such switches. the OM would confirm it.

BTW, tommie hockett, nice key way (nail) on that motor pulley. must make for some interesting rotational dynamics when the motor is activated.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The capacitor can be found inside where you see the red outline. The housing unscrews from the motor case.






.
Well I feel stupid. I know nothing about motors I thought that that was just so you could see the name. I should stop typing now before I make myself sound even more ignorant. Thanks Cabbie.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
that may not be true. many dual voltage tools use switches that function in both 110 and 220 configurations. only the motor connections and plug need to be changed. i believe c-mans used such switches. the OM would confirm it.

BTW, tommie hockett, nice key way (nail) on that motor pulley. must make for some interesting rotational dynamics when the motor is activated.

Well That is what we call southern ingenuity lol. So I'm not really understanding about the switch this is all Greek to me. Did I do something wrong with it?
 

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So I'm not really understanding about the switch this is all Greek to me. Did I do something wrong with it?
Some basic questions.

a) Does the motor turn freely? If not remove the belt and try again. I am seeing some rust and it is possible something is seized.
b) With the belt removed try starting the motor. If it does not immediately turn it off, no sense in waiting for the breaker to trip.
c) Can you try connecting to another circuit. Just trying to eliminate easy variables.
d) If the motor turns freely, how about a picture of the switch as it is presently wired.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
A) Well I normally have to pull the belt to get it started
B) I will go try that as soon as I finish typing
C) again Greek ???
D) I will post a pic later

Thanks Dave for all your help and for the two threads I do appreciate it
 
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