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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Want to wire a reverse switch (drum type) for my lathe. The electrical wiring is beyond me. I know that old craftsman shapers have a reversible motor. Any body know of a source for one? Can't get one from sears parts
 

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I am with George. If the lathe motor were reversible, the wiring diagram inside would show this.

I would be surprised if a manufacturer added a reversible motor but did not add a switch to enable.

The rewiring is not complicated, the the consequences of doing so could be dire.

In theory the present hot wire needs to become neutral, and the neutral wire needs to become hot. However, unless the motor has been designed for this, just rewiring could be very unsafe.
 

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my older 1 HP Craftsman motor is reversible

I got a reversing drum switch from Grainger like this:
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/SQUARE-D-Reversing-Drum-Switch-2BW44?Pid=search

I spent a few hours with a continuity meter and figured out which contacts did what. It works great. I may have made some notes...I'll look.

YOUR MOTOR MUST BE REVERSIBLE! according to the wiring diagram! :yes:

I think I found some helpful diagrams here:
http://www.armurerieduroi.com/pages/lathe/lathe_switch.html


Skip to 3:11 sec.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-WRbx2szLU
 
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I am with George. If the lathe motor were reversible, the wiring diagram inside would show this.

I would be surprised if a manufacturer added a reversible motor but did not add a switch to enable.

The rewiring is not complicated, the the consequences of doing so could be dire.

In theory the present hot wire needs to become neutral, and the neutral wire needs to become hot. However, unless the motor has been designed for this, just rewiring could be very unsafe.
+3.:yes: The motor has to be reversible.





.
 

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I am with George. If the lathe motor were reversible, the wiring diagram inside would show this.

I would be surprised if a manufacturer added a reversible motor but did not add a switch to enable.

The rewiring is not complicated, the the consequences of doing so could be dire.

In theory the present hot wire needs to become neutral, and the neutral wire needs to become hot. However, unless the motor has been designed for this, just rewiring could be very unsafe.
Not quite. Reversing hot and neutral does nothing (except perhaps in some instances creating an unsafe condition). Reversible motors have two separate windings and the reversing switch swaps one winding causing a phase inversion which causes the motor to run in the opposite direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks guys. i looked and i don't think the motor is reversible. under the cover there are no diagrams, just 2 unlabeled terminals plus ground. I can see there is lots of controversy about wiring. i think i'll have to go for a new motor if i want to reverse. Not sure that would be worth it. Anyway, thanks for your advice
 

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thanks guys. i looked and i don't think the motor is reversible. under the cover there are no diagrams, just 2 unlabeled terminals plus ground. I can see there is lots of controversy about wiring. i think i'll have to go for a new motor if i want to reverse. Not sure that would be worth it. Anyway, thanks for your advice
If all else were equal, I'd go for reversible...just for the sanding option.
 

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Perhaps it would be easier to pull the lathe out from the wall and work from the back side. When I was in high school they had all of the lathes sitting on about a 30 degree angle from the wall to give access to the back side. It also makes it easier to clean behind.
 

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Perhaps it would be easier to pull the lathe out from the wall and work from the back side. When I was in high school they had all of the lathes sitting on about a 30 degree angle from the wall to give access to the back side. It also makes it easier to clean behind.
That certainly does not rotate the wood the other way!
Reversing the rotation allows the wood fibers to be sanded with very fine paper the other way, resulting in a nicer job.

If your centers are perfect, and your head- and tail-stocks don't make too different o' indents, you can just ene-for-end the spindle and it will then be rotating the other way, but faceplate-turning won't allow that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Interesting ideas. The reason I am having second thoughts about reversing is i do mostly bowls and vases and Im concerned about keeping the chuck from loosening if run in reverse. Between centers of course doesn't have this problem. Have you guys with reversible motors had a problem with chucks spinning off and if so, how did you overcome it?
 

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I have Oneway Talon chucks. They have threaded holes for set screws which the instructions emphasize must be used when reversing the lathe. Same emphasis in the lathe manual.

The lathe spindle has a machined grove for the set screw. I purchased a couple of set screws, but do not normally use them. I will use if I try reversing the lathe.

My vacuum chuck does not have this provision so I expect HoldFast do not expect I will use this chuck in reverse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thanks Dave. i wondered about set screws. unfortunately my old lathe doesn't have a groove or flat for a set screw and i would be hesitant to run it in reverse without something like that.

This may be old news to all you turners, but in sanding a segmented bowl i used a ROS instead of just a rotary one, with very good results.
 
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