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I have a house that was built in the 1960s with log cabin siding. This siding was bought at a lumber yard, not custom made. I even went to the yard that sold it to my Grandfather who built the place. Now some of the pieces are rotted and it turns out NO ONE can get the exact siding I have, even yards that claim they can "Custom mill". I'm not opposed to buying a planer, but how do I get a knife to match my siding? I should think in the era of 3D printing this should be easier than it has been! Any Ideas?
 

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I saw Tommy Silva grind his own knives for a custom molding on an episode of This Old House.
if you have the proper shaper/molder, you can make your own knives - or have them made by a blade maker and have them case hardened, you "could" to the job yourself. The only profile you need is the round-over. The square end cuts can be either on the table saw or router.

what kind of woodworking experience do you have ??
 

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Welcome to the forum.

You might try a company that specializes in millwork. Many can grind knives to match a customer provided profile. In your case you can provide a slice of the siding for them to match. Once the knives are created they can mill the quantity of siding you need in the wood of your choice. They typically will charge by the linear foot in addition to the up front charge for grinding the knives.
 

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i agree you need to find a Mill Works shop, not a lumber yard. Places like that do custom work all the time and would have a set of knives made to match that profile.

You could do it yourself BUT you going to need something bigger than the average planner.
 

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That siding is too wide to make on a shaper, it would need to be done in a molder. There are custom mills around that could make custom knives for their molders but unless you need a ton of the siding it would be frightfully expensive. I think the first piece of siding would cost over a thousand dollars by the time they make the knives and set the machine up. The siding is pretty simple, the cheapest solution would be to make five sets of knives for a molding cutter made for a table saw. Now the knives are only an inch wide, it would leave a certain amount of unevenness between one cut and the next but that could be sanded out with an orbital sander. Corob Cutters You would get the cutter head and five sets of knives that don't have a profile ground in them, they are made for running a rabbet.

I had to make some custom crown molding for a customer that was 6" wide once. Since I only have a shaper I made two sets of 3" knives to make the cut. The steel alone ran $33.00 and inch twenty years ago and had to use 5" of steel for each set. I had to charge them five hundred dollars just for the tooling and set up to run it. It did leave a small groove where the two knives cut but I was able to sand it out with an orbital
 

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If you own a molding planner you can get blades from Bell Saw--http://www.belsaw.com/ . If you don't they will sell you one.:).
If you go this route I sugest using 3 blades not 1 with counter balances
 

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I'm not opposed to buying a planer, but how do I get a knife to match my siding?
Finding someone with the right equipment to mill the siding should not be an issue.


I have a Woodmaster planer/molder and that would be a very easy profile to run. A custom made knife made to match an existing profile costs about $125 give or take. Set up about 30 minutes.
Yep, don't overthink it. Simple process with a simple solution.

(14) Making log siding with a Woodmaster 718 and three sided molding attachment - YouTube
 

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First question is, where are you located?
My cousins run a milling shop in SE Michigan that can handle that size in their molding machine. If they don’t have that specific profile it runs about $40 per inch x2 to have blades made. Message me if you want more information.


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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I saw Tommy Silva grind his own knives for a custom molding on an episode of This Old House.
if you have the proper shaper/molder, you can make your own knives - or have them made by a blade maker and have them case hardened, you "could" to the job yourself. The only profile you need is the round-over. The square end cuts can be either on the table saw or router.

what kind of woodworking experience do you have ??
well, I know wood comes from trees...... basic homeowner repair carpentry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
First question is, where are you located?
My cousins run a milling shop in SE Michigan that can handle that size in their molding machine. If they don’t have that specific profile it runs about $40 per inch x2 to have blades made. Message me if you want more information.


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New Hampshire
 

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Sugestion
You could always remove a portion on one side and salvage the current siding and reside with new and probably never notice the difference since any new patch anywhere will sure to be noticed. Just use a small punch nd drive the fastener through rather than trying to pull it.
I used SS screws to eliminate staining and 2 coats of Sickens Log Stain on both t&g and face and Borax on back all B-4 install then caulked any knot openings while installing, eliminating insects and woodpeckers. That was seven yrs ago and it still looks like new.
There is a place in MI called Woodhaven Log in Mio MI, 231-938-2200 theirs is very similar to yours plus it's T & G on all 4 sides to help eliminate waste.
Not sure in your case, but it's recommended to keep the siding/logs 18-24" above grade to keep ground moisture & splashing away eliminating rot, I secured 1/2" Hardi Backer over 1" Blue board then thinset thin cut fieldstone 30" up with a limestone sill atop giving it the depth look of 4+" full cut split fieldstone.
At the base of the stonework I mixed Portland cement with a small portion of mortar to taper 3-4" up from foundation block to keep frost from lifting/loosening the stone.
It was a lot of work but as time has proven was wellworth it.
Good luck

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where's my table saw?
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I have a Woodmaster planer/molder and that would be a very easy profile to run. A custom made knife made to match an existing profile costs about $125 give or take. Set up about 30 minutes.

This was my very first thought on reading the thread. You Tube has several Woodmaster demo videos where molding are easily made using their "planer/molder"
The suggestion of using Foley Belsaw is also good, I own a Belsaw molder planer, but I've never used the molder function.
Steves estimate of $1,000 is not realistic if you can find a Woodmaster owner. Woodmaster's site may have a list of owners who will do moldings.
 

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Now that you mentioned it, yes to the knots, I suppose Goo Gone or maybe turpentine but I didn't want to chance removing the Sikkens nd creating a bigger non natural blemish issue. After awhile they seem to disappear .

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Now that you mentioned it, yes to the knots & fresh cut pine, I suppose Goo Gone or maybe turpentine but I didn't want to chance removing the Sikkens nd creating a bigger non natural blemish issue. After awhile they seem to disappear .

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where's my table saw?
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When I owned a Belsaw planer-molder, you could send off a shape on a piece of paper and have a set of blades ground.

How much of a problem you have depends on how much wood you need to replace.

You could rough in pieces, then build a router jig to knock off the flat lines so they become part of the radius. That would be fine for a few pieces.

A few years back, I was quite proud of myself. I hadn't been able to match siding on a Street of Dreams home from any products on the market. It was an OSB type siding designed to look like cedar. Each panel was three rows of 6" siding. I bought some cedar fencing from a big box and was able to make it look like the fake stuff. :ROFLMAO:

To get there, I bought the biggest bit I could, took off the guide bearing, ground off the mount for the bearing, and was able to use it in my router table by sliding the table fence over farther and farther until I ended up with the product I wanted. I primed and painted the ends and both sides, installed it, threw a fresh coat over everything and even I couldn't tell where the fake and real started and stopped. At least in the first year or two.
 
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