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Discussion Starter #1
I recently acquired this old wooden beer keg that I want to clean up and build a base to display the keg in my home. The keg spent most of it's "retired' life in and old barn or other dusty environment. I known I should balance between making it clean and not destroying the value. I think this keg has lots of dirt that needs to be remove. It appears to be unfinished oak.

Any recommendations on how to clean this would be appreciated!


 

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Sawdust Creator
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I'd use a scrub brush and an air line and see how much of the dirt you can get off manually. Maybe a mild soap and water.. That's a cool piece and I'd hate to see it ruined by to aggressive of cleaning.
 

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I like the idea of just cleaning it using a scrub brush, soap and water. If you have to finish it at all I think I would use a natural Danish oil finish or tung oil. For what you are doing Bri-wax would also make a good finish.
 

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As was suggested, nylon scrub brush with mild soap and water and see how it turns out. I always start with the least aggressive procedure first. That is a really neat piece of history, I hope you show us how it turns out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Per your request, here is the result!

I used warm water with dish washing liquid and a brush and was able to wash away decades of dirt successfully. I modified a couple nails to attach one of the loose bands. The nails were modified to match the originals.

I used 6" pine to make the base and I used some things around the shop to 'distress' the wood. I think I may try to make the base a bit darker. I'm working on buying a 'Country Club' tap handle. Country Club was a Goetz beer. If I can buy it, I'll rig up a simple looking tap to attach to the keg. I know that's not authentic but I haven't found much info on the keg anyway other than it is a 7 3/4 gallon keg and figured the tap handle will add to my display. I talked to the author of a book on Kansas City/St Joseph area beers and he had little additional information other than the size. What you can't see on the other end of the keg is that it has a hole drilled in it for a tap.

I'm not really a breweriana collector but I thought this old beer keg makes a nice additional to my man cave!

 
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